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188 Ingrid Marcum: Find Your Passion and Move Towards A Better You

In this episode of the Super Strength Show, Ingrid Marcum takes us on her journey to becoming a world-class elite athlete, strength & conditioning coach, weightlifting champ, speaker, educator, and Founder of BGB Fitness. During this interview, Ingrid inspires you to find a better version of yourself. 

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[INTRODUCTION]

 

[0:00:18.8] RT: What’s up Strength Maniacs? And thanks for tuning in. I’m pleased to welcome today’s guest Ingrid Marcum. Ingrid is a world-class elite athlete with a great passion for teaching and coaching. Accomplished in multiple sports, Ingrid started in gymnastics before she was two years old and later competed for the college of William and Mary.

 

A 2009 US National Champion in weightlifting and a two time American open champion, Ingrid also lifted in the 2004 and 2008 USA weightlifting Olympic trials. She was a US Bobsled World Team member between 2003  and 2013 and was an alternate to the 2006 and 2010 Olympic bobsled teams. Ingrid also successfully competes in the Highland Games.

 

Since 1997, Ingrid has also been helping others reach their own fitness and athletic goals as a speaker, educator, strength and conditioning coach and movement specialist. She has trained athletes from various sports both individuals and teams including her time as a strength coach at the college of William and Mary, and for the women’s US national field hockey team.

 

She also recently worked with the US women’s national soccer team on battling ropes — absolutely love battling ropes. We’re going to get to talk about that, if you haven’t heard about it guys, you’re in for a treat when you do finally try it. She stars in three fitness DVD’s with John Brookfield, by the way, an absolute legend especially in the grip field but he’s done a lot of amazing things. It’s in his book, it’s called — sorry, his video, it’s called Hurricane Ingrid. That’s actually the first time that I got to know her.

 

Partner and team training and mastery of physical prowess and is a lead instructor for the cross fit weightlifting specialty course. She often travels internationally throughout north and south America and Europe to speak at conferences and to teach a variety of specialty certifications, courses and workshops including the battling ropes, weight lifting, stability, mobility, gymnastics, hand balancing and bodyweight training and I’m pretty sure somewhere there’s a kitchen sinkbecause I think that pretty much covers it all doesn’t it? You can connect with her by visiting ingridmarcum.com.

 

[INTERVIEW]

 

Ingrid, welcome to the show, it’s an absolute pleasure to have you here. Your resume is awesome, I can’t wait to get into this.

 

[0:02:33.6] IM: Oh, well thank you so much and thanks for having me.

 

[0:02:35.1] RT: No problem at all, the pleasure is all ours. So how about we kick it off by having you just tell us a little bit about yourself? I mean you personify physical culture and you are into it completely. So tell me, how did you get into it? You started at a very young age, do you remember when you were a year and nine months when you started gymnastics? Tell me, what were you thinking when you started?

 

[0:02:56.1] IM: Well I don’t know that I was thinking anything other than I just need to go be upside down most of the time. I couldn’t cross a room without doing a summersault or a cartwheel and our local YMCA had a gym and swim program and all of my siblings, I have four siblings and all of us went through that program and I just took to the gymnastics immediately and just never looked back.

 

I have great genetics, all of my siblings were athletes as well and so I was very, very blessed and it’s just ingrained in who I am. I’m built to move, I’m built to challenge my body and see what it’s capable of and it’s just who I am. So yeah, I got started very early but absolutely loved it, I was a gymnast through and through, I’m taller now, now I’m five six and I even finished — I think I grew a couple of inches after I finished high school.

 

But when I started high school, I was four 10, a lot of people meet me now and I’m this five six, 75 kilo weightlifter and people are like, “Wait? You were a gymnast?” But I was. I was four ten and 80 pounds when I started high school. I was actually very, very tiny and very strong. Strength has been something that’s been sort of something I’ve been proud of I guess my whole life and just naturally was part of again who I am and part of who I am and part of my makeup.

 

I was certainly a strong gymnast, I competed in high school, I was on a private club team so I trained 35 hours a week, I competed for IGI which is a local gym here.

 

We’ve had a few famous athletes come out of there, Olympian and some other people. So it was certainly a different high school experience than most people have. I went to school and I went to gymnastics and that was pretty much my life. But it was always my choice and it was, even still looking back I would still make the same choice. Gymnastics is actually probably still my favorite thing that I’ve done. I went on to compete at the college of William and Mary, did division one gymnastics.

 

And at 21 you’re pretty ancient so when I finished college — I mean it sounds so silly but look at all the gymnast in the Olympics, although I will say, I just have to mention this because there is Oksana Chusovitina who, she was a gymnast at the time I was a gymnast and she is just I think a year older than I am, not even and she just qualified for her seventh Olympic games as a gymnast. She’ll be competing this summer in Rio at 41 as a gymnast. That’s amazing.

 

[0:05:18.9] RT: Yeah, I’ve seen her in the Olympics, I remember they’re making a big deal about it.

 

[0:05:21.8] IM: Yeah, she’s amazing.

 

[0:05:23.0] RT: 41.

 

[0:05:24.3] IM: So anyway, I had to mention that because I keep saying, “You’re ancient at 21 in gymnastics,” and she’s just this sort of an anomaly that’s just been able to keep going. I did, I felt ancient at 21 and I got in to strength and conditioning, that was something that spoke to me and over the course of becoming a strength coach, I got exposed to Olympic weightlifting.

 

I was just taking the course as a coach, but was recruited by the guy who was teaching the course and said, “Hey, you should be a lifter.” That’s actually how I got started in weightlifting, believe it or not. Went on to a lot of great things with weight lifting. I became a national champion in ’09 and did a few world trials and Olympic trials and again, just absolutely loved it, I dove in head first. It was, for me to be able to start something in my 20’s and have a shot at Olympic games was just totally beyond what my comprehension.

 

Out of weightlifting, two of the coaches for the US bobsled team actually happen to catch me lifting, just in training, at the NSEA convention in 2002 and invited me to come out to try out for bobsled and because I’m open to opportunity and I’m always interested in what other challenges there are for me, I absolutely jumped in headfirst again and I went out and I won my first combine and one of my first push championship and went on and competed for the US for over the course of 10 years.

 

I would go back and forth between weightlifting and bobsled, the one I focused on depended on whether it was a summer Olympic quad or a winter Olympic quad. But I basically competed in both through the time I finally decided to retire from bobsled, which was just two and a half years ago so 2013. Long career, to feel ancient at 21 and then compete for another 17 years is pretty amazing.

 

[0:07:14.8] RT: That is incredible. I got to tell you, that quick couple of minutes there, if that isn’t enough to tell you, “you should probably leave the house every now and then because you’ll never know who you’re going to bump in to and where it will lead you,” I don’t know what is. That’s tremendous. Just being out there and doing your thing and doing what you love, look where it’s lead you.

 

[0:07:32.6] IM: That’s for sure. I actually got involved in Highland Games much the same way, there was a guy who happened to be just helping out at the nationals because they were here in Chicago in ’09 and I got to talk to him and know him a little bit and I found out that he threw Highland Games. I was taking a little break from bobsled in 2010 and just kind of wanted to do something different, something fun. So I called them up and got to do Highland Games.

 

So I had a lot of fun doing that, I had never thrown anything in my life. Having an athletic background and an understanding of just bio mechanics and technique, I was able to — I was invited to an amateur world championship at my second season and ended up three to eight months which was pretty cool. It’s actually one of the things I haven’t thrown since then. I’m actually planning on getting back to that a little bit, hopefully soon.

 

[0:08:21.2] RT: Yes throwing stuff feels good doesn’t it? Seriously.

 

[0:08:23.3] IM: Oh it feels so good. It’s so funny because coming from weightlifting, when you hit the snatch just right, there’s just nothing else like it.

 

[0:08:32.2] RT: No, no. That’s just perfect.

 

[0:08:34.3] IM: Yeah, and even though I had never thrown anything before, I could feel it in my body without having done it just watching people and watching that release and I just, I had always wanted to experience that and try it. So then when I got the chance to actually do some throwing it was just like, “Ah, this is great,” it’s the same thing, when you just hit that just right and the timing and the speed and the technique is just right, it’s the same thing, it just feels so good.

 

[0:09:03.5] RT: When a snatch, when you get — the form is just dead on, it almost feels like weightless, it’s so hard to explain how, everything just works perfectly and just the movement is extremely, it’s almost like a hydraulic almost. That smooth. Throwing, there’s something about that. I think there is obviously a bit of a close relation with the Olympic lifts, you got that explosion and then throwing has that explosion but with the throwing, it’s a little obviously different because you’re actually releasing the object that you’re holding on to.

 

I remember being at a track meet in high school and seeing one of my friends Trevor and he was throwing javelin and he’d let out a bit of a yell when he threw it and to me that was the first time I kind of saw that stuff and seeing somebody do that because a few people who threw before, I think they were like in grade 10, he was in grade 12 at the time. I was in grade 10 also. We didn’t know what the heck we were doing, right? For the most part unfortunately.

 

A lot of us we just started at that point in time, it wasn’t like we were practicing track leading up to that point. Not a lot of experience. Him on the other hand, he had a few years so seeing that and just, I don’t know the satisfaction and obviously the discus as well. I was like, yeah, I think I’m going to do that, I think I’m going to try that out and it was a lot of fun definitely.

 

[0:10:19.4] IM: It’s just so cool. I’ll tell you, I think the change for me for moving from, not moving because I was still weightlifting obviously but the difference that I find as a weightlifter, my strength funny enough was not in my strength, I was not strong for a weightlifter. I was a strong girl obviously but I was not strong for a weightlifter. I was fast, powerful and efficient.

 

So my pull was everything, but I would get pinned under cleans all the time. Like I could jerk, I could snatch, great. I could pull a clean to my chin but I would get pinned at the bottom because I just wasn’t strong. What’s so cool about highland games is that even though you have to be strong, I was strong enough to make it work and you get that release and then there is no standup from a clean. You just get to let go after the power and speed part.

 

[0:11:12.8] RT: That’s a good point.

 

[0:11:15.0] IM: So it was actually kind of a nice change for me.

 

[0:11:18.2] RT: That’s a real good point actually, you’re right, there’s no getting stuck or pinned.

 

[0:11:21.3] IM: Right. You just get to let it go and watch it fly.

 

[0:11:26.6] RT: Okay, how about this? Let’s get in to the first main question of the show and somebody like yourself with all that you’ve accomplished and that tremendous energy that you have, I’d like to hear this. How about you share with us one of your favorite success quotes, maybe an axiom, a motto, a saying and an example of how you’ve applied it, the meaning of it, to your training in life?

 

[0:11:46.2] IM: So what’s interesting is, the one that I’m going to give you is actually the name of my business and that’s why I named my business this and it’s “Better Get Better” which essentially is just better than yesterday. As an athlete, it’s not enough to be good, it’s not enough to be great, you always want to get better, right? So if you’re only comparing yourself to the field when you’re on top, then where do you go from there? But if you’re comparing yourself to where you were yesterday, you’re always trying to get better, you’re always trying to move forward.

 

And not only that, if you get injured, if you whatever. Again, if you’re trying to compare yourself to the field, that’s a problem but if you get injured and you’re moving yourself forward again and you’re only comparing yourself to yesterday, then you can see more positive and stay on track and move yourself forward. I think I’ll talk about that a little bit when we talk about one of the next questions.

 

But yeah, so just being better than yesterday and always — and that now applies in my world as a strength coach to if you have somebody who has never done anything in their life fitness wise and they come in to see me, we’re just trying to get better. If I have somebody who is an athlete at the top of their game, we’re trying to get better. It’s always getting better and there’s not an end to it right? It’s just a never ending process. It’s not like okay, here is your 12 week program and then we’re done, “Let’s just keep getting better,” because we can always get better. Anyways, I guess that’s my motto.

 

[0:13:20.3] RT: I like that. Ancora imparo, something that Michael Angelo used to say, always learning.

 

[0:13:27.1] IM: Always learning, exactly.

 

[0:13:28.9] RT: Always improving, always learning. All right, let’s jump in to sharing a story of a time in your training when you encountered a major challenge and if you could take us to that time in your life and tell us a story and share the lessons that you learned from it?

 

[0:13:42.4] IM: I will. So the story that I’m going to use for this one, I have another challenge that’s maybe just more significant over the entire course of my career but I think it fits better, had a different question so I’m going to use that later. But the challenge I’m going to talk about this time made a big change in my attitude towards training and competition. I had been, it was always about winning or making the team or getting a score or getting a number or getting whatever. It was more about the destination rather than the journey.

 

So going into the Olympic year in 2005/2006 for bobsled, I was ranked second on the team, I had come in, I had done well in the combine, I had done well in push championships, I was 9,000’s of a second behind Vonetta Flowers who had been the Olympic gold medalist in 2002. Mind you, all of our athletes were very good, there were six break man that year that were really pretty close but I had proven myself, I thought, to be at the top. The way that bobsled works is there’s lots of different combinations, lots of variables that go into how teams work together and I was relatively new, I hadn’t really raced with the girls that were driving that year and it was driver’s choice.

 

So I actually went the entire season and I did not get selected for a race and going into then the Olympic team selection, I did not get selected for the Olympic team. It was probably, I came out of that season physically, mentally, emotionally completely destroyed. It took me a few months to finally come back from that and because all I can keep saying was, “But I proved myself, I did this, I did this.” But it wasn’t enough right?

 

I made kind of a switch in how I operated to understand that there were lots of things out of my control, nobody targeted me, there was nothing like that that happened. It’s just, this was the circumstances and other people were chosen and that’s just how it works, that’s unfortunately how bobsled works in general. Going into the next season, the only way that I was able to come back and continue training and continue going for that without any promise that anything was going to happen. No promise of anything.

 

The only way I could do that is if I finally understood that I could only do what I could do and if I could. When that decision is made, if I could look back and know that I did everything possible that was under my control going into that selection then I had to be happy with that and that was success. Especially if I had proven my numbers when we had testing, when we had whatever. I mean there’s no more you can do than that. Then I was able to — I certainly had disappointments throughout my career, it’s not like everything is okay.

 

But you’re able to continue and you’re able to enjoy the process a whole lot more and appreciate the sweat, the tears, everything that you’ve put in and walk away from a career being really proud of it even if you didn’t reach the ultimate goal of what you were striving for, right? Because there’s so many other things that can happen. I guess that’s my challenge that changed a lot of who I am and how I operate in my career.

 

[0:17:23.6] RT: Yeah, that resonates with me on so many levels. Not just in athletics, physical culture, working out but also in just life, work, business. I remember having this one project I was working on and I was just not willing to allow myself not to try everything. I had to turn over every single stone, I had to try everything I could to get this thing through and I had the consultant working and he, I think, thought I was crazy because I just was like, “No, this is what we’re doing.”

 

Even if it means that I have to literally do it the hard way and if it means I have to go out there and knock on every single door in the city and whatever is required, I’m going to make this thing happen. Prior to that, this person never really did that. They just basically put in whatever effort that he put in and whatever was approved would be approved and that was that. I just thought to myself, “No.” Because regardless of what happens, even if I get what I’m shooting for or maybe a little more than what I’m shooting for to turn around and look back and go, “But what if I gave more and everything I had, then what? I let myself down. I cheated myself.”

 

And if I didn’t get anything at all but I gave it everything I had, well then if you’re logical and you step back and you take a look at it and you’re reasonable, you would say well, I did  everything in my power. In this point of time. Down the road I may have better skill set, I may know other people, who knows? But I did everything I possibly could and I left it all on the field and the cord and the ring, whatever you want to say and that’s that. In doing that, that’s the best that you can do and if you’re honest with yourself then yeah, you leave feeling good about yourself because that’s what’s required over time to ultimately achieve the things that you want.

 

[0:19:15.3] IM: Oh it’s so true. It’s then carried over just like you’re saying into the rest of their life. I have goals and it doesn’t change how hard I train for those goals because if it did then I’m  not fulfilling of that criteria of doing everything you can. But changes how I veered and how I decide whether or not I’m a success or I’ve had success or I’m proud of what I’ve done.

 

Because if — you could easily look back over a career and say yeah, I didn’t do this and I should have been good enough but I didn’t. You could be very negative about it but instead it’s like, “Wow, look at all the opportunities I had. Look at what I was able to accomplish.” Then you can be happy with it, it’s just a totally different place to be, it just changes your entire attitude on everything, right?

 

[0:20:09.3] RT: Well you said “confidence” and I think what it does is when you know that you gave it everything you have, that in of itself gives you a level of confidence because you know you didn’t cheat yourself and you didn’t whimp out. It does a lot for you, it’s not just it increases your chances of winning, even if you don’t win, it still built your confidence because you walk away saying, “Yeah, I did everything I possibly could. I have nothing to be ashamed of.”

 

[0:20:33.8] IM: Right, that’s exactly the point is after that season, I could have easily walked away completely disappointed, completely destroyed and just been like, “Well that sucked.” You know? And instead, I was able to overcome that disappointment and come back and do some pretty cool things.

 

[0:20:53.2] RT: Awesome. All right, well speaking of pretty cool things, that’s a bit of a segue into the next question which is sharing a story of a time in your training and when you had a breakthrough moment. If you could take us back, paint the picture for us, get us really into the moment with you and then share with us what are the steps that you took to turn that light bulb moment into success?

 

[0:21:13.7] IM: The breakthrough moment I’m going to share is actually, it’s seemingly a really tiny thing but turned out to be a launching pad to so many of the other things that I’ve done. When you get into bobsled and you watch the push, I mean most people aren’t really familiar with what actually is happening in a bobsled race. But in the first 50 meters and actually by 50 meters you’re already in the sled.

 

The first 50 meters is the start and as a push athlete, that’s your job, you are responsible for getting the sled moving as fast as possible in that first 50 meters as you can as well as creating acceleration on the sled. As brakemen, we’re just compared to one another. So you’re pushing off of a block and the movement that you do to get the sled moving actually is very similar to a snatch. So you fall into the sled just to preload the body and then you drive out and you essentially snatch those sled out in front of you and then start running behind it. That’s essentially what happens.

 

But as anybody who has tried to learn to snatch knows, it’s really technical and we do have some athletes that come in that just naturally push a sled well but that kind of goes with everything. And pushing a sled well and pushing a sled even better than that is where the world class athletes define themselves. I came in and I had won my first push championships, I’d done a lot of really great stuff but there are certain technical things that I was doing wrong and one of those was as I would go to hit the sled, my hips would come up.

 

The only thing that my coaches and my push coaches and all these other people who are involved in bobsled could tell me was, “Don’t let your hips come up. Don’t let your hips come up.” I couldn’t figure out how not to do that and what was really cool is that’s how it was actually the summer five, I was training in Calgary under a coach and I knew that was a problem. So he was really working on some of the technical refinements with me. I kept talking to him about my hips, my hips, my hips. And he goes, “Yeah, your hips are coming up, but I’m trying to figure out why.”

 

We did frame by frame review of video every day for hours of all my pushes, of everything that we’re doing so that I could really understand and what we found out was that there was something I was actually doing with my feet as I hit the sled that caused my hips to go up and until I fixed my feet, my hips couldn’t change. So no matter how much I focused on my hips, it wasn’t going to make a difference until I fixed my feet. As soon as I fixed my feet, I came in second at push championships that you’re behind a gold medalist.

 

So it’s a really tiny change but that was the first time in my career that I understood more about biomechanics and spending those two months just doing all of that video review. I learned so much about how the tiniest change can make the biggest impact and I became a huge student of biomechanics and efficiency and that’s where even in the last part of my career where I actually was dealing with a lot of injuries for the last part of my career and I was very limited in how much training I could do and what things I could do for training but because I had spent all this time understanding efficiency, I was actually able to continue performing at a higher level than I should have based on what my training was entailing at that point.

 

Anyway, so I say that to kind of show the breakthrough for me was the understanding of how alignment, position, and how the whole body connection works together to create performance and those tiny little changes and how big of an effect it can make on what you’re able to do. In Highland Games, in weightlifting, in bobsled, very technical things. I was able then to apply that to everything I’ve done and really fine tune as much as I could and then have great success because of it.

 

[0:25:24.5] RT: It’s interesting, it makes me think of a story that Arnold talks about. He said that he bought Grey’s Anatomy. Him and Franco and they kind of learned how the muscles in the body work and actually, I recently found out that Jack LaLanne did the same thing and they’re not the only ones, actually quite a few people have done this over the years where they get that kind of additional knowledge and it helps them out in kind of going beyond their own limitations and even passing the competition. So something to be said about that.

 

[0:25:54.4] IM: Yeah, I agree, it’s proven to be a valuable knowledge set that I continue to expand on. Again, always learning, there are still so much that I want to learn about that and how those things affect people but using that now with other athletes has just been huge. So applying it to myself and playing with it over the course of 11 years and then now working with other people on those things, it’s been a really cool thing.

 

[0:26:23.2] RT: Yeah, and the reality is there is just so much to learn, it reinforces the reason that finding either a mentor or somebody who really knows his or her stuff to teach you, they have already figured out whatever it is that they’re involved in and it just saves you so much time because it’s really easy man, to start heading down that rabbit hole and before you know it, you’re two, three, four, five years in and you’re still digging and still going.

 

Whereas if you get somebody who has been around the block and really knows his or her stuff. Within obviously not just a workshop will teach you a lot of stuff in of itself but obviously you may need a little bit more than just one little weekend but bare minimum, they’ll at least save you from going down a lot of dead ends possibly. That’s always a reason why I highly recommend finding somebody. I think I’m kind of getting ahead of myself because that’s something you and I are going to be talk about later.

 

Right now, we’re going to go to a break. Guys, you’re listening to the Super Strength show, we got Ingrid Marcum, world class elite athlete and we’re going to be right back with more goodness from Ingrid, be right back.

 

[BREAK MESSAGE]

 

[0:27:28.3] RT: The world of working out is seriously confusing at first. It punishes uneducated lifters with years of poor gains and injures, and reward smart ones with slabs of lean muscle and superhuman strength. If you don’t know if you’re using the right form, have hit a plateau, or things just seem a whole lot more confusing than you thought they’d be, I want to help you out.

 

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Whether you’re a novice lifter or have years of experience in the Iron game, this is a very helpful resource that you can either apply to your own training or use as a helpful guide to teach others. Stop wasting time and effort in the gym and get the info you need to maximize your gains and minimize your risk for injury. Visit www.Instantstrength.com and get your free report today.

 

[INTERVIEW CONTINUED]

 

[0:28:33.4] RT: All right, we’re back with our guest Ingrid Marcum, athlete extraordinaire and coach extraordinaire. We’ve been talking about some of her life experiences and what not. Her breakthroughs and we have somebody else who is agreeing as well with me that she is an amazing athlete and coach. Let’s get to the next question here which is — and by the way, what is the four legged wonder’s name?

 

[0:28:55.6] IM: Oh well the one I have up right here right now, his name is Magnus. Magnus is about 20 pounds, which is the funny part but he’s got a Magnus personality. I actually have four dogs only one of which is up here with me.

 

[0:29:07.5] RT: All right, okay. Magnus by the way is hilarious. Name is Magnus? That’s actually… especially if you know what the word Magnus means. That’s awesome. Okay, next question, if you could recommend one training resource for our listeners, what would it be and it could be anything. Books, apps, coaching programs, you name it. What would you recommend?

 

[0:29:25.4] IM: What’s funny is you mentioned it already earlier is for me, it’s finding an in person mentor and that I think is irreplaceable. You can read all you want, go to a workshop, take courses, do stuff online but until you get somebody who works with you directly and can help you understand the pieces of what they’re teaching, I just think that is the best thing that you could possibly do.

 

And everything else can augment that. It’s not that any of this other stuff is not beneficial because it certainly is but I would find whatever it is that you’re trying to do, go study with somebody, go shadow them, go intern with them, offer to clean their gym.

 

[0:30:17.2] RT: No, seriously.

 

[0:30:18.8] IM: And I’m not kidding, that’s seriously so much that I have learned. I learned because I either went and saw a therapist for something and I mean it’s the same thing when I was trying to figure out what was going on with me when I had all these issues with the hip and the back and all these things.

 

I probably went to 30 different therapists, and not everybody has a complete answer and not everybody has the same answer. So I’ve been able to piece things together myself by taking this from this person, this from this person, and you just start constantly learning. The same thing with training, as an athlete, I wanted to find the best coaches that I could find and I moved across the country to train with my weightlifting coach and its, you do what you need to do.

 

If you want to really learn something to the utmost degree, which why wouldn’t you want to if you’re interested in it? Find the people in that field and learn from all of them. Learn from the person. If you can find somebody local obviously or somebody that you can go see for a period of time, that’s even better. It’s also got to be somebody you resonate with. Just because somebody knows their stuff doesn’t mean that you two are going to be a good match for somebody who is teaching and somebody who is learning. It’s kind of putting your feet in the water and trying some stuff out. But I love in person more than anything else.

 

[0:31:44.4] RT: Agree, agree. Somebody could explain something to you, let’s just say form, but it’s completely different when they’re actually watching you and they’re not just giving you what the generic text book good form is but they’re looking at you at your body, your makeup, your abilities and now they can kind of cater that to you and in addition to that, sure, they could say, “Oh you need to do more of this or you need to pull a little higher before you dip on the bar,” whatever it may be.

 

It’s different when they’re there and they can actually put their hands on you, right? And then magic happens, as happens when people put their hands on you. Completely different. And I said earlier, a workshop you could learn a lot in a course of a workshop, you’re not going to learn everything obviously but you can actually learn so much stuff.

 

I mean even somebody telling you just one little tip here or there that could have potentially taken them years and hundreds of workouts for it to finally click in their head, saves you all of that time. But shadowing like what you mentioned Ingrid, yeah if you’re serious about whatever it is you want to do, ultimately you got to find a mentor that you can be around. I mean really be around in one form or another. I agree with you.

 

I think we had a guest on the show before who said that they went and worked at somebody’s gym, was I cleaning the gym just to be with them and to watch them train others and there’s personal trainers man, the ones that really love what they do and want to help others, they’ll allow you to do that, they’ll allow you to come in and kind of watch them work with others. Obviously you got to clear it probably with the client, they may think it’s kind of weird, like, “Who is that weirdo on the corner just standing there?”

 

[0:33:19.0] IM: Well I will say, I’ve had three coaches who have done that with me, who have come in as an intern and did certain things for me. Sometimes I am terrible at, if I do a workout with somebody and I have homework for them, I am actually terrible at getting it to them because I just get busy from the other things and whatever. I would have them, I would tell them what the things were, they would do the homework, write it out for me and send it to the clients.

 

There’s lots of ways they can help you and that also gets them involved in seeing how I program and all kinds of things. They’re even learning more when they’re doing it but there’s lots of things, especially if you are running a business, there are lots of ways that you can use help and especially free help. If somebody just wants to come and learn from you. But yeah, I’ve had a few people that did that and actually one of them just opened his own gym, so that’s a pretty great on both sides for sure. It can be beneficial for both people.

 

[0:34:18.4] RT: For sure, nowadays it’s so easy to get a hold of people and high quality people that really know what they’re doing. Ingrid for example, you can access them online, social media, whatever it may be, you could reach out to them and contact them, it makes it even easier and a lot of people, I mean Ingrid just said she was willing to do it. They’re open to helping you, you just need to actually ask, that’s all.

 

All right, speaking of helping, let’s get in to this next question and that is pretty easy. Kind of one that I like to have some fun with if you’ve heard any of the other episodes, you know I get a little goofy with it but anyway. This next question is a fun one and when you answer it, if you can give us some specifics, that goes a really long way into helping us and here we go.

 

So, you are getting ready I think for Highland Games and that’s what you’re doing and I come around the corner and there’s a funk, I got a quilt on and you’re like, “Oh my god, I think Ray forgot to wear some underwear and I don’t know what’s going on down there but what is that smell?” How is that for a visual everybody? Didn’t expect that one did you?

 

Now, the reality is, that I got the DeLorean parked behind all of the implements that they use, the cable toss, all that stuff is all piled up. The DeLorean’s actually parked in behind. I didn’t want to stir off the whole kind of medieval kind of look to what we’re doing. Stainless steel, kind of weird. I hand you the keys, Ingrid, I know this was a crazy lead up to the question but I figure hey, we got to talk before, you’re not going to run away scared I don’t think.

 

Here’s the keys to the car. Full tank of hot garbage, that’s what’s causing the funk, you just got to get it up to 88 miles an hour. If you go back in time, knowing what you now know, how would you structure your training to get the best results in the shortest period of time and set you up for long term success?

 

[0:35:56.4] IM: Well I’ll start with, I’m not going to say that I — well, I will say that it was a mistake in my training now looking back but I did two sports, high intensity, power, sympathetic sports. Back to back for 10 years and a bobsled season would end in February and then weightlifting nationals would be anywhere from like May to August timeframe.

 

I would finish Bobsled season and immediately start my training full force for nationals and then weight lifting Olympic trials or world trials would also fall in that timeframe. It would be august and we would have bobsled testing in August, September, October and then a whole season racing from November until February. Most athletes have an end season and an off season. I had an end season and an in season.

 

By the end of my career, I was broken as an athlete and I was getting by like I said because I was efficient and I was powerful and I maintain the high level of strength but I was definitely in a lot of pain and I was just broken as an athlete. Looking back, what I understand now is I was so worried about that next thing that was coming up and didn’t necessarily have my bigger goal in mind and it’s really hard to do when you’re in the middle of it.

 

You know, “Nationals is coming up, I have to be ready for nationals.” But what was the bigger goal? The bigger goal was try and make it to Olympic team. What I feel like I probably should have done is taken time every year or following every season to have an assessment of what I was missing or what I was lacking and for me it was stability up the wazoo. I had mobility like crazy and I had no stability anywhere. So that led to a lot of issues in my training and that’s actually what led to a lot of my breakdown.

 

But if I had taken the time following a bobsled season to take four weeks and go, “Okay, let me test myself on X, Y and Z and actually create a foundation of training program,” because I would try to jump in to a weightlifting program and a lot of weightlifting programs early on will do the 10 by 10 squats, right? And all of this high volume, high rep stuff to create a strength foundation.

 

I was so broken down even years ago that I couldn’t do a 10 by 10. I would do one week of high volume training and by week two, I couldn’t even do what I had done the week before, much less make progress. I just would get worse and worse if I kept trying to do volume and at the time I just assumed, “Oh well, I’m just one of those athletes that can’t do volume. I’m a power and speed girl.”

 

But what I know now is, I just had eaten away at my entire foundation until it finally completely was gone and if I had just maybe taken the time and said, “All right, my ultimate goal is Olympics, world championships, whatever it is. If that’s my ultimate goal, I might have to sacrifice this year’s nationals and get myself to a point where I can be ready when the big stuff comes.”

 

[0:39:30.4] RT: Right, yeah.

 

[0:39:31.6] IM: But when you’re in the middle of it, you’re so concerned about that next thing that’s coming. “No, I can’t take time off of training. I have to do this.” But looking back, I think it would have been much smarter to skip maybe an American Open or skipped a nationals and come back stronger the next season for everything, which is a really hard thing to tell an athlete and I’m not sure if I told myself that, if this me would have told myself that at that age, I probably wouldn’t have listened either. But who knows, maybe there were people that told me that but I certainly didn’t hear them.

 

But I really think that was the biggest thing and I think I could have been a better athlete if I had taken the time to do that stuff or at least assess that. Because some of it you can even do throughout your training, even if you’re in the midst of a season, you can kind of assess some of those things and add them in, and I didn’t do any of that. And I certainly paid the price but going through that at the same time, I’ve now learned a lot about that and about rebuilding a body, rebuilding connection, rebuilding basically from the ground up. I’ll be actually be interested to see where I can go from here, that will be fun.

[0:40:39.7] RT: I find that interesting because there are quite a few guests that come on that say one of the recommendations they have is for people to start with some type of like a gymnastic or track and field type of background that allows them to explore a wide variety of movements prior to specializing to something else. That sounds a lot like the eastern block. My understanding is they tend to do a lot of that with the way that their system is setup.

 

Don’t know if that is still true or not with now the Russians, but quite a few people have said that. With you, starting at not even two years old, you were into gymnastics, I was interested in seeing what you had to say and yes, there’s actually quite a few high level competitors over the years where I’ve heard them say things along the lines of whether it’s bodybuilding or some type of performance based sport of some sort.

 

Many times, got to back off of some of the volume of competitions you’re entering because your just, by the time you get to the big one that year that you really want to go after, you’re not necessarily written off but you’re just not really at a hundred percent. Whereas if you would have paced yourself a little bit better and a little bit wiser with whether competitions, events that you chose to go into, by the time you get to the big event that you want to go to, you’re a lot fresher and possibly even stronger, and more abled, more enduring, whatever it may be, whatever the competition is. That’s actually some pretty good advice.

 

[0:42:03.1] IM: I’ll say now, I’ve now spent, I retired like I said in September of 2013 and I had already kind of been started along the path of trying to do all this rehab because I was just in such pain but then when I finished bobsled, I literally did not touch the gym for about two years. I maybe dabbled a little bit here and there like I would maybe get excited. Like about a year and a half in, I would start hitting the gym but then I just felt like I was working down again.

 

So over the course of the last year, I’ve maybe worked out about 20 times which coming from a background where I was training 35 hours a week, that’s just insanity but that’s just what my body needed. But what’s really fascinating for me now is now at 40, I feel better than I did at 30 because of the foundation that I have now spent the time creating and the connection that I now have.

 

I’m more solid, my joints could withstand more training, more intensity, more volume and not break down the same way. So it’s not even just a kind of a theory that had created that foundation I feel like I could have been a better athlete. Like I’m feeling it now and understanding just the control and what I’m capable of doing with my body at this point and how young I feel and how powerful I feel. Had I done that 10 years ago, I feel like that would have helped me tremendously.

 

[0:43:39.9] RT: There you go. All right, well Ingrid, we’re pretty much at the end of the show. Man, so many more questions I want to dive in to with you. When you said you had mobility, not so much on the stability side of things, I mean that in and of itself is a show. I’d love to have you come back on, thank you on behalf of myself and the audience.

 

[0:43:56.4] IM: Thank you, that’s actually one of my — I’m working on a bunch of product stuff and that’s actually what I talk about. When I speak at all of my courses, stability is one of the biggest things people are missing and it’s one of the big things that I hit on and talk to people about when I’m teaching. So not only the show, but it’s kind of an entire piece of the information that I’m putting out.

 

[0:44:23.0] RT: Well that actually leads me to the next point which is two things before we end it off for today, which is where can we find out more about you, if you could just give us a bit of parting advice.

 

[0:44:33.2] IM: Sure. So more about me, you can just head to my website, which is constantly being updated and in the next six months, even though the next while and then continuing beyond that obviously, I’ll be putting more and more information out there, I’ll be downloads and product and all kinds of stuff available and lots of information. You can certainly find me on Instagram on the Iron Valkyrie, you can find me on YouTube, you can find me on Facebook.

 

If you do find me on Facebook though, you have to follow me, you can’t friend me because I’m actually out of friends. The other place you can find me is that brookfieldtrainingsystems.com. I know you talked about earlier, the videos that I had done with the battling ropes. We’ve actually just released our certification program online with a couple of other programs as well and we’re constantly putting out information at that website as well. That’s brookfieldtrainingsystems.com.

 

You can also send me emails through my websites. I’m easy to get a hold of, I’m easy to find, just search for me and I’ll be there and if you’re in Chicago, come and find me. I certainly do some in person training of all of the things we mentioned from gymnastics to weightlifting to stability, mobility, movement et cetera. So I am around.

 

[0:45:44.5] RT: Excellent. Now, you did mention you’re putting something together and I know that’s going to be ready soon here. By the time this has probably aired, it will be ready. Do you want to maybe give a little bit of info on that right now and the website is IngridMarcum.com. How about you give us just a minute or two to sum what it is that you’re putting together there for people to…

 

[0:46:08.1] IM: Yeah sure. If anyone has heard me talk at perform better or this show I’ll be talking at the NSEA and girls gone strong but I’ve talked about structural integrity and creating a body that is able to withstand the rigours of training whether it’s volume, intensity or load and so many people jump into training year after year and even if they’re new and they haven’t really created a solid enough foundation and so they’re not efficient with what they’re doing and their body just is not going to be able to give them what they want out of it and potentially could break down, cause injury, cause all kinds of things over time.

 

So what I’m doing is, I’m going to be putting out a program that will help you evaluate the pieces of your body that you need to look at and they’re very simple things that you can do and then a way to train all those pieces so that you can have a body that’s ready to train and to train for anything you want to do. If you want to do weight lifting or power lifting or CrossFit or endurance running or sprinting or Highland Games. Anything that you want to do, you can do, it’s just teaching you to move better and creating a body that is efficient and uses everything in the best alignment and best ways that you can.

 

[0:47:24.6] RT: Yeah, crucial, crucial foundational type of work that essentially sets the stage for the highest level performance that you could ever achieve. You need to have these building blocks in placed, these foundation stones. So highly recommend people check that out. IngridMarcum.com. So guys, make sure you check that out. Parting advice, what do you got for us Ingrid?

 

[0:47:56.0] IM: Oh, parting advice. That’s a good question. I would just say, keep training, keep learning, find the things you love, find the things you’re passionate about and pursue it. Pursue it in any way you can and share with other people.

 

[0:48:11.2] RT: I like that last part, share with other people, I like that. They say the best way to learn is to teach.

 

[0:48:16.4] IM: I was just going to say that. That’s one of the things we talk about in our courses a lot. That was actually what was really cool for me being a coach and an athlete at the same time is learning to do what I did as a coach helped me as an athlete all the time and things as I was teaching somebody else something, I would figure something else out myself and be able to apply it to my training.

 

So it’s pretty amazing the places that you can find your own little pieces of performance and they’re out there and it’s just a matter of putting the work in and putting your head down and getting to work.

 

[0:48:52.6] RT: Yeah, and just going out to kind of a workman type of attitude, just get in there, do the work, day in, day out kind of deal and just make it a part of your life and things really start to happen. Make a point of taking notes, you know how you feel, how this feels. I find myself doing that all the time and the more I focus on that, the more almost like perceptive or sensitive I become to, let’s say, form for example. I start picking up on little things because I’m actually paying attention now.

 

[0:49:19.4] IM: Paying attention to your own body because if you pay attention to how a program is working for somebody else doesn’t mean that that program’s going to work for you. If you really start to understand, and that’s actually one of the things that I really did well in my career is I started to understand what did and didn’t work for me as an athlete. And I tried all kinds of things, believe me. But if something’s not working, I’m not going to just beat myself over the head with it. I’m going to change it up and figure out what does work for me.

 

[0:49:48.9] RT: 100% agree with you. That’s the thing. Don’t feel like you have to stick with something because somebody else is using it. That being said, for the most part, “science” generally agrees on a certain set of parameters, workouts, reps and sets, days per week, certain amount of food you need to eat that will pretty much give you certain types of results. Endurance, strength, muscle gains, whatever it may be.

 

That doesn’t mean that you just kind of come up with some wild crazy idea. No, I’\m not saying that but just like you were saying Ingrid, you may feel maybe high volume is not for me, maybe it’s more low volume, vice versa. You need to pay attention to that because there’s more than one road that leads to Rome, here we go, how about that one?

 

Or to the top of the pyramid or top of the mountain and just realizing that just because this is the in thing or this is the cool thing or this is what everybody else is doing, it doesn’t mean that you have to do that, if you find it’s literally not working for you. However, caveat is, making sure that you are truly applying it the way it’s supposed to be done. A lot of times we think we’re doing things correctly but we’re really not when you take a real critical eye.

 

And somebody else takes a look at what it is that you’re doing, they start to realize, “Not exactly, this isn’t quite right and this thing here is maybe a little bit off and this over here is not quite right,” and when you add it all up, it adds up to this is actually quite a few items that are kind of throwing things off. So it’s like a recipe, right? A little extra gram or two extra of something here, a few extra grams there, the extra dash there and before you know it you have a completely different recipe, right?

 

[0:51:16.5] IM: Absolutely. Well and if you know you like garlic, you put in a lot, if you don’t love garlic, you don’t use it very much. I mean that’s kind of how it is, right? Try different things.

 

[0:51:26.4] RT: All right Ingrid, thank you so much. Guys, it’s superstrengthshow.com and you put in the search bar, Ingrid Marcum and then you will find the show notes page, you will be able to listen to the show again there, download it, share it socially with all the buttons there, we really love it when you do that.

 

Also, there are some links to the various podcasting platforms we’re on where you could listen to it there but we highly recommend that you actually subscribe to it because then guess what? Boom, it comes back to you it automatically, you get the updates and you don’t have to go running around looking for the shows and constantly trying to remember, “Did a new show come out that I missed?” They just all come to you. As you can see, with guests like Ingrid, there’s some pure gold that they come on here and they share.

 

Also, any link, goodies, all that stuff that she mentioned during the interview are going to be on the show notes page, we’re going to have some great images, photos, there’s going to be some videos, all kinds of good stuff, bonus Q&A, it’s all going to be there. So check it out guys, make sure you go there, check it out. Also, if anything Ingrid said resonated with you, she’s in the Chicago area, do you want to give out the address where you’re at or just simply go to the website?

 

[0:52:28.9] IM: Well, you can certainly go to the website. I’m actually, I moved my — because I’m doing so much teaching and traveling so much, I’m actually, I moved my business inside of Big Shoulders CrossFit, which is owned by Tom Seroka and Brandon Ziegler. Tom used to actually work for me, I got him started in weightlifting which is a whole another story but yeah. So Big Shoulders CrossFit is where my gym is in Chicago so that’s easy to find. I certainly have my website as well.

 

[0:52:51.4] RT: All right, there you go guys, real easy, real simple. So just think, just go back okay, and listen to the intro, okay? Listen to basically her CV or her resume and all the things that Ingrid has accomplished. This is somebody who has been there, done that and not just reading books or just putting in a few hours in the gym. No, no, no. She was doing 35 hours a week at one point, okay? Big background, Olympic level athlete. She’s done it all.

 

Just imagine the favor you would do to yourself if you actually go and learn from somebody like Ingrid. So she mentioned finding a mentor earlier and you know guys, I’m always the one that’s always harping on that. I always say, there is no shortcut in life and the only real closest thing to a shortcut is doing it right the first time. The only way that’s going to ever happen is if you have a guide, somebody who has been there, done that, ideally started in a similar position to you and even better than that, has taken others like you to the Promise Land and can come back and take you there too.

 

When you find somebody like that that you connect with, not just that they could teach you well and they don’t just necessarily have the skill set and the knowledge but personality wise, you really connect, amazing things can happen in very short periods of time. It’s kind of like flight. Listen to me throwing all this stuff in. We went from horse and buggy within like a couple of generations we’re on the moon. Like what in the world happened there? That’s because they just learned the principles of flight and before you knew it, they went from like crazy bi and tri planes, and the Red Baron type of guys to all of a sudden you got fighter jets.

 

It’s the same thing with the body, once you dial it in, you start doing things correctly, you’re eating right, you’re recovering properly, you’re training properly, your form is right, your mobility is right, your stability is right. The body will then do what you want it to do, which is however you train it. More endurance, more size, more strength, less fat, whatever it is, it will do that because you were doing things correctly.

 

Having somebody like Ingrid on your side helping you along the way and you show up and you put the work in, that’s the big thing here. Just because you have all this stuff doesn’t mean anything, it’s kind of like a poser who gets all the crazy gear to go do whatever it may be, but really doesn’t know what he’s doing. Well that doesn’t help either, you can’t just have an amazing go and put the effort in, you got to put the effort in. Pretty sure Ingrid, makes sure you put the effort in too if you show up at her gym.

 

So anyway, the point I’m making is, take advantage of just the amazing resource that people like Ingrid are, I mean just tremendous. She made time out of her day to come on the show and I truly believe that this is in all likelihood just resonating with some people. Guys, girls, young, old, whoever it may be, athletes, check out, see what she’s about. If you guys are a good fit for each other, make it happen, definitely make it happen. That actually leads to the next point, which is getting great guests like this on the show require us to have an engaged audience, not just my lovely personality obviously.

 

We show the guests or potential guests that we have an engaged audience by the reviews that we get. So when we have great five star reviews guys, if we truly believe we deserve it, it goes a long way, ratings will who up higher in the rankings, they could see it, they could expose to it, they get to join in on the fun that we’re having here and the benefits that they give from these amazing guest but also what it does is it shows that the guest that we’re looking to get on, hey, we got an engaged audience, it’s worthwhile to come on to share their message and spend an hour or whatever it may be from their day to be on the show.

 

If you could do that for us on either iTunes or Stitcher, you can leave reviews there. Five star reviews on iTunes go a long way for us. Only if you think we deserve it and for everybody who has done that for us so far, thank you so much, we really appreciate it. Feedback, good bad or fugly, let us know guys, what you want to hear different, if you want us to keep doing what we’re doing, whatever it may be, guest you want us to bring on, questions you want us to ask them.

 

Just shoot over that feedback, simply feedback@superstrengthshow.com and then if you have any training photos, before and after, maybe your home gym setup, info@superstrengthshow.com and when you’re on the site, don’t forget to sign up for our own little free report and you get the weekly newsletter as well. That’s simply signing up on basically any page on the website when you’re on our site, superstrengthshow.com.

 

So with that being said, thank you so much Ingrid, absolutely love having you on and there’s a lot more that we can get in to, a lot more.

 

[0:56:58.8] IM: Yeah, thank you for the invite for sure, that was a lot of fun.

 

[0:57:01.2] RT: No problem at all, I’d love to have you back on. So many things that we can talk about, battling ropes? Like what is that all about? Why is that even effective? Is it actually different than other things? And guess what guys, it is. It provides you a different method of training that you can’t get any other way, that’s really interesting stuff. So much. We’d love to have you back on and thank you so much for making the time.

 

All right guys, as we always say, put this stuff to use and until next time, train smart, train hard and talk to you then.
[END]

 

More Specifically in this Episode You’ll Learn About

  • Ingrid shares how she got started in the strength game!
  • A shift from gymnastics to weightlifting
  • Find out why you always want to get better
  • Become better than yesterday
  • You can only do what you can do
  • Take time to understand your efficiency
  • The importance of finding a solid mentor/coach
  • Learn how to tone things down so you can focus on the long-term goals
  • Focusing on creating a solid foundation
  • Why stability is one of the biggest things people are missing
  • Find your passion, pursue it, and share it with other people

About Ingrid Marcum

Ingrid Marcum is a world-class elite athlete with a great passion for teaching and coaching. Accomplished in multiple sports, Ingrid started in gymnastics before she was 2 years old and later competed for the College of William and Mary. A 2009 US National Champion in weightlifting and a two-time American Open Champion, Ingrid also lifted in the 2004 and 2008 USA Weightlifting Olympic Trials. She was a US Bobsled World Team member between 2003 and 2013 and was an alternate to the 2006 and 2010 Olympic Bobsled Teams. Ingrid competed briefly in the Highland Games and had a successful couple of seasons.

Since 1997, Ingrid has also been helping others reach their own fitness and athletic goals as a speaker, educator, strength & conditioning coach and movement specialist.  She has trained athletes from various sports – both individuals and teams – including her time as a strength coach at the College of William and Mary and for the women’s US National Field Hockey Team. Ingrid also recently worked with the US Women’s National Soccer team on Battling Ropes. Ingrid stars in three fitness DVDs with John Brookfield: Hurricane Ingrid, Partner and Team Training and Mastery of Physical Prowess and is a lead instructor for the CrossFit Weightlifting Specialty course. She often travels internationally throughout North and South America and Europe to speak at conferences and to teach a variety of specialty certifications, courses and workshops – including Battling Ropes, weightlifting, stability, mobility, gymnastics, hand balancing and bodyweight training.

You can connect with her by visiting IngridMarcum.com

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Guest Videos

Ingrid Marcum, floor exercise, gymnastics tumbling

 

Clean pulls

 

MoveStrong M3 bars playtime

Connect With Ingrid Marcum

Website
Facebook
Twitter  – @IronValkyrie
Instagram – @theironvalkyrie
Flickr
Google +
YouTube

Bonus Q&A

Every person that we interview on The Super Strength Show has an opportunity to answer some extra questions that aren’t asked in the podcast. It’s a chance for our listeners to learn a little bit more about our guests and to get even more value from our show. Check out the answers that  Ingrid Marcum provided below!

Can you share one of your habits that contribute to your success in the gym?  Consistency, determination, learning to  read and listen to my body

What are your favourite exercises?

Snatch and snatch variations
Deadlifts
Battling Ropes pulling work and Battling Ropes power generation
Sprints
Jumps/Plyos
Throwing
Handstand and other gymnastics work
Circus class – as a strength foundation it’s amazing!

What are your favourite muscle groups to train?  I don’t tend to train muscle groups – I train movements… but I guess legs and shoulders.

What are your favourite pieces of equipment?  Barbell, Battling Ropes, my own body, gymnastics or circus equipment.

What is currently on your workout music playlist?  Everything from country to Metallica!

How do you psych up for a workout or set?  Honestly this has never been something I had to focus on.  I’ve always been mentally prepared for my training, and for tough days or tough sets, it’s just about buckling down, doing the work and giving it everything you have with every ounce of attention and energy you have.  I also use visualization.

What was one exercise or routine that gave you great gains in muscle mass and/or strength?  I put on the most size when I was doing a large amount of heavy volume work. I do 4-5 working sets of 20 reps where most of those reps were tough and as heavy as possible.

For strength, I did well with a 5×5 or 5×6 foundation and also with pyramid sets, doing 2-3 rounds of 1×3, 1×2, 1×1, working progressively heavier with each set, then repeating the 3-2-1 sequence, with each round heavier than the one before it. So if I went 100×3, 105×2 and 110×1, then I’d do 105×3, 110×2 and 115×1 the second round and so on.

What’s your favourite way to speed up recovery between workouts?  At my age, there isn’t any speeding up the process 😉 But honestly, I have always been a fan of massage, acupuncture, parasympathetic activity, self tissue work, light activity, sauna, and cold tub.

What’s your favourite meal?  Hmmmm… I don’t have a favorite, but I do like good food!

What’s your favourite cheat meal and how often do you indulge?  My favorite cheat isn’t really a meal – it’s dessert 🙂  When I’m really in training mode, maybe once per week.

What supplements do you feel work well for you?  Magnesium, Vit D, B complex, Fish oil, BCAAs, creatine and greens.  Never really did much more than that.

What do you do to relax?  Time with my boyfriend, time with my dogs, jigsaw puzzles, reading, movies, time with my family, travel, home projects, and gardening.

Check Out What Others Are Saying on iTunes! 

  • Awesome Podcast
    April 21, 2017 by Brooke Craven from United States

    Ray, host of Super Strength Show, highlights all aspects of fitness and nutrition in this can't miss podcast. Ray and his expert guests offer insightful and inspirational advice on how to live a healthy lifestyle!

  • Un canal de lo mejorcito en la materia
    July 17, 2016 by Pipiripiii from Spain

    Un canal con contenido muy completo e interesante. Gracias ppr toda la info!

  • Informative, deep and instructional
    July 9, 2016 by Charles M R from United States

    That Frank Zane interview!

  • awesome fitness podcast and great variety
    July 7, 2016 by jskoosh71 from United States

    Really glad I found this. Lots of care into each podcast, Ray walks the walk and really understands what is being discussed. I really just have one request- stop the Delorean story.

  • 51 and going strong
    June 22, 2016 by Canvas back from Canada

    I used to lift heavy in my late teens and into my 30s and then other thinks like kids,job, house etc took over and I lost motivation. I'm 52 now and starting to show the signs of aging so I thought I better get back at it. It was real tough. Slower gains, easy injuries, slower recovery. Tough to get back into the grove. While searching for some motivating pod casts I came across the SSS pod casts. I listen daily and I can honestly say that it has changed my life. It's more motivating that a gym full of people. I have learned more in 2 months than I learned in 20 years. The host is great to listen to, is very knowledgeable and keeps me wanting more. The guests are great. I look forward to listening. We have a wellness committee at my work and I think I have the entire group as fans of the SSS. Please don't ever stop!

  • Physical Autonomy = Personal Liberty
    June 18, 2016 by Mrsborch from United States

    Ryan inspires me to change my fitness mindset from just doing more reps to creating a body to live the life I want.

  • Lucky find
    May 16, 2016 by Keith3187 from United States

    Stumbled upon this podcast and very glad I did, fantastic guests with tons of evidence based information, highly recommended.

  • Tier 1
    May 14, 2016 by Dragon 1-5 from United States

    Truly a great pod cast very informative and 100% applicable.

  • Great interviews
    May 5, 2016 by Adamdv18 from United States

    Ray has some very interesting guests on here and does a good job of getting some useful information out of them.

  • Intelligent, interesting interviews
    March 25, 2016 by Clown puncher 5000 from United States

    Really. Smart guys.

  • Killer Podcast
    February 26, 2016 by RidgeWC from United States

    Ray puts out a really great show—every episode is top quality!

  • Great work!
    January 14, 2016 by NotMattDamon from Canada

    Impressed by the content and guest - keep up the great work!

  • THE Super Strength Show
    December 14, 2015 by Oastorga from United States

    I came across this podcast through another great podcast (the RDella Podcast) and I must say I'm hooked. I like the action items that are revealed for us to do rather than just taking in more info. I especially like that is simple but not simplistic. I'm 58 years young and shows like this reafirm that I'm doing the right thing. I use Kettlebells, Sandbags, Barbells, Indian Clubs and body weight in my training. I don't look like a fitness model but I feel pretty good. Knowing more and refining techinque has been very important for me. The idea is not to just listen but to do something with the information. The format allows that. Thanks for your hard work.

  • BOOM!
    December 1, 2015 by Getusomemore from United States

    I listened to the entire interview with Danny Kavadlo while I was cooking dinner. VERY good podcast! I give it a ?!!

  • Highly recommend this show
    November 30, 2015 by Altruistic? from United States

    I love this show. Thoughtful host. Interesting guests. Since listening it, I have been giving more consideration to the mental side of training. It's a very encouraging show.

  • Great show!
    November 14, 2015 by Rmolson from United States

    I started training at the age of 41 obese and intimidated. The guests are an inspiration and encouragement toto keep moving forward on this journey.

  • Amazing Content
    November 13, 2015 by MattTucker93 from Canada

    Love listening to this podcast. Amazing information and I always learn something from all the great guests. Thank you!

  • Great show
    September 15, 2015 by unadjective from United States

    Some really cool guests that I wouldn't otherwise come across and Ray does a great job getting into their expertise. Almost always wish the show was longer.

  • I love this
    September 12, 2015 by Mvecdi from Canada

    Please don’t ever stop,i really enjoy it. Wish i found it before. I listen to it while working out or driving etc. Just wanted to tell you to keep doing what you are doing. And would love to see more of people like Mike Israetel etc. Such as Brad Schoenfeld. Anyways love the show, thanks for making it.

  • Very professional
    September 7, 2015 by Ayrshire Lad from United Kingdom

    Always learning something new from Ray and his well selected line up of guests. Sometimes feels a little repetitive as Ray asks all the tried and tested questions to ensure the listener always has a takeaway..its laid back but focused and very professional !!

  • I love this
    September 3, 2015 by Mvecdi from Canada

    Please don’t ever stop,i really enjoy it. Wish i found it before

  • The best podcast in the strength/ fitness industry!
    August 28, 2015 by Powerlifting101 from Canada

    I recommend this podcast to anyone that trying to physically and mental better them self in every aspect.

  • Excellent Resource
    July 25, 2015 by J. Steinmann from United States

    Some great interviews with a wide variety of people. I've listened to a number of episodes, and there's always some great information in every interview. If you're serious about strength training, health and fitness, or just want some good life philosophy, this podcast is worth a listen.

  • Must subscribe!
    July 9, 2015 by Roddygo from United States

    This is one of the best fitness podcasts. A lot of big names from various backgrounds and Ray asks good questions. He also knows when to ask follow up questions without getting too out of subject and having the guests share some more secrets

  • Great Show!
    July 8, 2015 by Wes Kennedy from Canada

    Ray is a great host and has a wide range of quality and professional coaches that have a TON of experience to share with you. Check it out!

  • Excellent interviews!
    July 8, 2015 by another anatomy geek from United States

    Ray does a fantastic job of asking articulate and interesting questions. I always really enjoy his podcasts and learn useful info! Keep up the good work!

  • has become the best Strength podcast
    June 21, 2015 by SuperHuman YYZ from Canada

    I think its overtaken superhuman radio and motivation + muscle as the top podcast for those who love physical culture and the iron game. Ray does a great job interviewing, just the right amount of interjecting his ideas and opinions. The guest list is incredible, the who's who, past and present.

  • The fountain of youth.
    June 10, 2015 by rroxanne from Canada

    Very good . I love the article. I listened to it 3 times to write everything down. Lol. Bad memory. Oh and love Rays voice.

  • just pure MEGA, Pig Iron all the way
    May 25, 2015 by Strongman1981 from United Kingdom

    The Super Strength Show is an amazing and extremely informative resource for anyone involved in physical culture. With an enthusiastic and highly intelligent host and a who’s who’s line up of guests, a must for anyone to sit down, eat grapefruits and enjoy. great work chaps

  • On another level! Once you hear one episode you will have to hear them all!
    May 22, 2015 by Chuck Osswald from United States

    Super Strength Show starts with top performers/coaches/trainers from around the world and chunks down all the important pieces, directed towards any audience. Ray Toulany is unparalled in his ability to make information easy to understand as well as tease out the unspoken gems. You will be glued to your speakers for the entire episode and find yourself eagerly waiting for more. The care put into each episode is clear with a show notes page that helps the curious learn in any medium. Keep up the great work and thanks Ray!

  • A fountain of Strength and training knowledge
    May 14, 2015 by HCF82 from United Kingdom

    After searching for an age to find a good strength podcast I discovered the super strength show through Chris Duffins interview and have been hooked since. The format is excellent with some of the best voices in the world of strength and conditioning appearing. No nonsense straight talking, this really should be one of your first resources to go to if you are a coach or an average joe looking to improve in the weight room.

  • fantastic
    May 10, 2015 by gena_wallis from Australia

    i enjoyed your session.looking forward to more staff.Victor from the Youngpreneurs Podcast!

  • Well structured, interesting, and informative.
    May 2, 2015 by TEEJ888888 from Canada

    I just listened to the first two episodes of the podcast. It's really good. The questions are solid, there is lots of good advice for lifting and for life, and Ray does a good job at interacting with the guest but keeping things on track and flowing. Ray is articulate and the guests seem professional and smart. Overall, I'm very impressed.

  • My top 5 favorite show!
    April 16, 2015 by mrcdmag from United States

    Great show with lots of valuable information! I always have my notebook open and writing.

  • Top strength show
    April 16, 2015 by Alastair7890 from United Kingdom

    Very informative. Top guests

  • Great Show!
    April 10, 2015 by SloneStrength from United States

    Well prepared show. Amazing professionalism! Keep up the great work.

  • AWESOMENESS CONTAINTED
    March 4, 2015 by jamie729 from United Kingdom

    This is an awesome podcast the format, the guests & the topics disscussed are all truely infomative. No BS contained the show always opens up new schools of thoughts and ideas to the listeners. keep up the good work.

  • Subscribe, instantly addictive
    March 2, 2015 by thebroadkaz from Canada

    This show is amazing to listen to it motivates you not only for the gym but for setting and achieving goals in your every day life. Very motivating and positive. Truly helps to get you in the right frame of mind for life and for the gym.

  • An absolutely ace show everytime
    February 24, 2015 by Tommy Eggleton from United Kingdom

    This show is phenomenal! The format and repeated questions for each episode keep the show driving forward, the guests have had ample time to prepare excellent and considered opinions and yet the show never feels like anything but no-BS conversations on building seuperhuman strength and mighty bodies. The host, Ray Toulany, consistently does a marvellous job of drawing out even more from his guests than the material they've prepared and some of the stories that are teased out are superb. I wholeheartedly recommend this to anybody that trains, thinks about training, or simply admires strength sports and bodybuilding in general.

  • Great Resource
    February 4, 2015 by Velvet Jones81 from United States

    For someone new to the strength sports like myself this show has been a great resource. Thanks for doing this show. It has helped a lot.

  • Paul McIlroy
    February 2, 2015 by Paul McIlroy from United Kingdom

    I've been an avid aficionado of all things strength and physical culture related for the vast majority of my entire life. As a former world champion powerlifter and trainer of world champions in different strength sports I can honestly say that Ray Toulany's Super Strength Show is an absolutely INVALUABLE resource for those wishing/needing to maximise their holistic understanding of strength, what it is to be strong, why that is important and how to best achieve it! The list of guests reads like a star studded "who's who" of strength and conditioning ROYALTY! Plus, more than anything the interviews are a ton of fun and provide a fascinating insight into the very best in the business and what makes them tick. It was my complete pleasure and privilege to be a guest on this amazing show (episode 37). If YOU claim to be serious about strength training and are not currently subscribed to THIS show, my honest advice is do so immediately...if not sooner!

  • Super Strength Show
    January 26, 2015 by Joeino from United States

    I love this podcast as I seem to pick up valuable information from each guest. Listing to this is a fun and productive use of my time

  • Excellent Information
    January 26, 2015 by TaylorrrrNB from United States

    These guys obviously do their homework, work hard to create an excellent show and know who to interview in the world of strength and fitness! I’m very impressed by what they have created and the quality of what they do. You need to subscribe! TODAY!!

  • by Brandon Richey
    January 22, 2015 by Great Work SSS from United States

    The Super Strength Show is a fantastic resource for all things concerning strength, fitness, and life. The multitude of guests provides tons of information and perspectives that every listener will appreciate. If you’re serious about strength and the physical culture this is a resource that you just can’t pass up!

  • Very glad I stumbled across this podcast!
    January 22, 2015 by rk102 from United States

    Great info from big-time guests in the strength and conditioning world. Keep up the great work, Ray!

  • Awesome show
    January 13, 2015 by Bonjower from Canada

    The Podcast is the best I’ve encountered in the fitness/bodybuilding sector. The host has a great ability to pull the pertinent information out of his guests. The topics are great and you seem to be able to get useful information out of every interview! Awesome podcast!!

  • Do yourself a favour and subscribe
    January 1, 2015 by GameOverBoss from Canada

    The amount of info and resources in the SuperStrengthShow is just incredible. All of this coming from guests that are the best of the best in their fields. Great questions are asked to these guys and some really insightful answers given (along with a few laughs). I hate wasting time and i'm always looking to evolve and refine my training. This podcast has saved me hours of digging through the crazy crap on the internet to find valid info. It has also introduced me to things i would have never thought to look up. Really can’t recommend enough.

  • Master SFG
    December 24, 2014 by X-Fab69 from Italy

    Awesome Podcast! A whole lot of great and useful information provided by very accomplished athletes and coaches with an extended experience on the ground!

  • Charles C
    December 22, 2014 by CharlieConnely from Canada

    Very impressed with the quality guests that the Super Strength Show is interviewing. Loaded with with actionable and inspiring information. Great production quality and daily episodes!

  • Well done Ray
    December 19, 2014 by Matt McWilliams from United States

    Wow…Super Strenght Show Podcast is flat out awesome. Good production quality. Easy to listen. Very impressed Ray. Keep bringing it.

Click here for the full page of reviews!

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187: Jerred Moon: The Ultimate Training Guide To Becoming A Garage Gym Athlete

About This Episode

In this episode of the Super Strength Show, Strength &
Conditioning Coach, Jerred Moon, is here to talk about his new book
“The Garage Gym Athlete – The Practical Guide to Training Like a
Pro, Unleashing Fitness Freedom, and Living the Simple Life”

To quickly rate and review the show click
here
.

Jerred joined us back in episode 100, so if you want to get a
bit more context around today’s guest and his background,
definitely check out that episode. To bring you up to speed, here
is quick bio…

Jerred is a Strength and Conditioning Coach and creator of End
of Three Fitness which specializes in simple, effective
barbell-centric fitness for the other guy.

He’s a former Physical Training Leader and Fitness Program
Manager within U.S. Air Force Special Operations command and he’s
been featured in CrossFit Endurance, WOD Talk Magazine, Sweat RX
Magazine, Life Hacker, The Huffington Post, The Art of Manliness
and many other websites and publications.

He currently coaches and programs for hundreds of athletes from
military operators to stay-at-home mom’s.

Get access to all the resources Elaine LaLanne mentioned
during this interview by visiting SuperStrengthShow.com/187

 

————————————————–

More Specifically In This Episode 

  • From the Air Force to the physical fitness industry
  • Side hustle and training people to become better
  • What is The Garage Gym Athlete and what are the benefits to
    creating your own garage gym set up?
  • Why everyone should have a some kind of home gym set up
  • Achieving an elite level of fitness with a basic $500 garage
    gym set up
  • The consistency associated with “at home workouts”
  • DYI Squat & Bench Rack
  • Barbell vs Dumbbells
  • The versatility of Rings and why they’re a great addition to
    your garage gym
  • The Great Mistakes – how to stay accountable and get feedback
    on your form
  • The importance of building a foundation for the basic
    lifts
  • Advanced athletes and learning the basic principles of
    programming
  • The benefits of Block Programming
  • Tips for completing your workout in 60 minutes or less
  • Keeping your eye on the time and cutting down on transition
    times
  • Tips for keeping yourself accountable, benchmarking, and
    training alone
  • Learn why you should be waking up early to train

————————————————–

Rate, Review, and Subscribe In iTunes 

Reviews for the podcast on iTunes are greatly appreciated
(especially 5 star reviews). They allow us to get the word out
about the show and grow as a community. This also helps us bring on
fantastic guests to share their hard earned knowledge and wisdom
with YOU.

We read every single review on iTunes and believe that each one
goes a long way in helping us make the show even better! It would
mean the world to us if you participated in rating/reviewing our
show in iTunes. To quickly rate and review the show click
here
.

 

————————————————–

Free Report

Head on over to InstantStrength.com to
get access to your free report titled, Instant Strength: The One
Little Trick that Will Instantly Boost Your Strength by 10lbs or
More In Your Main Lifts.

 

————————————————–

Connect With Us

Email: info@superstrengthshow.com

Facebook: facebook.com/thesuperstrengthshow

Twitter: twitter.com/strengthshow

YouTube: YouTube.com/superstrengthshow

Want even more FREE strength, conditioning, and muscle building
tips from today’s top experts, delivered directly to your inbox?
Subscribe to Super Strength Show e-Newsletter for FREE by
visiting SuperStrengthShow.com

 

————————————————–

Got A Comment or Question?

Good, bad, or fugly, we want to get your feedback. If you
listened to this show, tell us what you think by sending an email
to feedback@superstrengthshow.com.
We want to hear from our community and look forward to connecting
with you!

————————————————–

To Read the Full Transcript, click here. You’ll see the transcript drop down
menu just past the audio player and brief intro paragraph.
 

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187 Jerred Moon: The Ultimate Training Guide To Becoming A Garage Gym Athlete

In this episode of the Super Strength Show, Strength & Conditioning Coach, Jerred Moon, is here to talk about his new book “The Garage Gym Athlete – The Practical Guide to Training Like a Pro, Unleashing Fitness Freedom, and Living the Simple Life

Collapsable Transcript

Read Full Transcript

[INTRODUCTION]

 

[0:00:18.2] RT: What’s up Strength Maniacs? And thanks for tuning in. I’m pleased to welcome back today’s guest, Jerred Moon. Jerred joined us back in Episode 100. So if you want to get a bit more context around today’s guest and his background, definitely check out that episode. To bring you up to speed, here is a quick bio. Jerred is a strength and conditioning coach and creator of End of Three Fitness which specializes in simple, effective, barbell centric fitness for the other guy.

 

He’s a formal physical training leader and fitness program manager with the US Air Force Special Operations command and he’s been featured in CrossFit Endurance, Raw Talk Magazine, Sweat RX Magazine, Life Hacker, the Huffington Post, the Art of Manliness and many other websites and publications. He currently coaches and programs for hundreds of athletes for military operators to stay at home moms. Definitely covers the full spectrum there.

 

Today, Jerred is here to talk about his new book, The Garage Gym Athlete: The practical guide to training like a pro, unleashing fitness freedom and living the simple life, which we’re going to discuss in detail during the interview. I don’t know, some of you guys may have picked up during the course of my interviews but I train at home myself, I have been for years, and years, and years. I’ve got to give credit where to do Brooks Kubik from Dina sour training, he’s the one that really turned me on to that.

 

And I got to tell you, there’s a lot of benefits to training at home, we’re going to get in to that, Jerred’s going to discuss a lot of that stuff. I’m excited about this, this is a good thing man, this is really good. If you’d like to connect with Jerred, you can find him at EndOfThreeFitness.com.

 

[INTERVIEW]

 

[0:01:55.0] RT: Jerred, welcome back, absolute pleasure to have you back here my man and let’s jump into this and let’s just start off. For those who may have not listened to the first one, again, Episode 100, I highly recommend you go back and listen to it, give a little bit more information about yourself.

 

[0:02:10.0] JM: Hey man, it’s great to be back on the show, I’m super pumped, Episode 100 was kind of a milestone there and I was glad to be the guy in the spot but quick background on me, it all started how far we want to go back. I’ve been into fitness for a really long time, ever since I was a teenager, how all this stuff came about, I’m talking about End of Three Fitness and what I’m doing today.

 

I was originally in the air force trained to be a fighter pilot, got injured and kind of — I still had some time in the air force but I kind of turned my sights back to fitness and wanting to do that because that was kind of the decision I had to make before I ever went to college was, “Okay, are you going to pursue training other people? Are you going to pursue your dream of being a fighter pilot.” Once that was kind of crushed, I went back to the fitness scene but I had time left in the air force part of my commitment.

 

So I started my website, End of Three Fitness on the side and just hustled, side hustled for a long time. Training people in my free time, taking every opportunity I could in the air force to be a fitness leader or a unit fitness program manager and everything, while kind of sharing that experience and training people at EndOfThreeFitness.com. That’s the short of it. That’s how we got here and that’s what I’m doing today is running EndOfThreeFitness.com and helping as many people as I can become better.

 

[0:03:35.7] RT: It’s a beautiful thing my man. I got to tell you. Helping people figure out exactly what they need for a home gym, which I think is going to surprise some people is definitely in line with your raw mission because there’s something to be said for having a home setup. Don’t get me wrong, going to a good commercial gym or a good powerlifting gym or Olympic weightlifting gym or some type of a CrossFit box.

 

Having the right spot with the right energy, the right vibe, the right people, that’s awesome Training partners, potentially that’s an amazing thing. But even if you have that, personally I think, you still can benefit from having a home setup because you never know man man? You may get busy, you may not be able to get out that day to the gym, I don’t know, depending on where you live, who knows, maybe you got a crazy snow storm, you can’t get out the house. You never know, there’s some real benefits for having a home setup.

 

Let’s do that. Tell me if you wouldn’t mind, what caused you to decide, “You know what? I think I should put a book together on setting up a home gym and actually training at home”? It’s good because another point I want to make quickly is this is not just a guide on how to setup a home gym, there’s a lot more to it than this. Just for those who are wondering, we’re going to get in to that too. What made you decide? I’m going to put this together, this is the thing I’m going to do.

 

[0:04:44.8] JM: It’s really been a kind of a culmination of everything I’ve been doing at end of three fitness because how I did get started originally was me sharing some garage gym DIY tutorials on my site. That was the very basic start to End of Three Fitness and I’ve been a garage gym athlete for a long time. I think coming up on six years and it was 100% on necessity why I started my garage gym.

 

As I mentioned earlier, being in pilot training, it has one of the most demanding time tables I’d say in the US military and so you have very little time to work out and train and I realized that was happening and as a person who had been into fitness for a long time, I was like, “You know what? Life’s not getting any less crazy from here on out but I need somehow to make it stick. There’s no way I can be the guy who doesn’t work out anymore.”

 

So that was me putting together a garage gym on very little money at the time and I just did a ton of DIY projects and so this book, I decided to really put it together because like I said, it’s a culmination of everything I’ve done because I’ve done the DIY projects, that’s in the book but I’ve also seen other people, friends, family, people from End of Three Fitness kind of try the Garage thing out and it didn’t stick.

 

That’s why the first part of the book, I kind of cover from the shoulders up getting people’s minds right before they tackle the garage gym and then the last part of the book I cover programming and how to actually do this on your own and be successful at it. That’s why I put together because I really want people to succeed, I didn’t want it to be a book about myself, I didn’t want it to be a book about professional athletes and who may have a garage gym or anything like that.

 

I wanted it to be about the garage gym athlete, the person who really wants to do that and how they can be successful. If you really think about it, it’s not an easy thing to do especially if you do live somewhere where there’s crappy weather or if you have a time or whatever the case is. I really try to make the book all-encompassing to help someone be successful.

 

[0:06:44.9] RT: Okay. What would you say to somebody who either hasn’t started training or maybe is training but is going to a commercial gym and has never really thought of having a home setup? What would you say to them?

 

[0:06:58.9] JM: You kind of hit the nail on the head a minute ago. I always say, whether this is your primary gym or it’s your backup gym, you need something at home. For those times that you are talking about. Maybe there’s a snowstorm depending on where you live, maybe life just gets a little too crazy for you to do the commute to your gym, the holidays, it doesn’t matter, you don’t have to have a huge, elaborate setup.

 

I think a few basic utensils in the garage could really help or your basement or outside on your tree, whatever the case is for you. I think everyone should have some way of doing fitness at home that goes beyond just body weights, squats and pushups. That’s where I think is — if you want to stick at the Global Gym or your CrossFit box because of the community or the amenities, that’s fine but I recommend something setup at home as well.

 

[0:07:49.9] RT: Okay. For those who are thinking to themselves, “Am I going to have the money to do this? I go to a commercial gym, some people may know that one piece of equipment is in the thousands of dollars. $2,000, dumbbells can cost a fortune if you want to get a rack of dumbbells. This stuff can be really pricey.” What would you say to those people?

 

[0:08:14.5] JM: If price is going to be a factor, that’s a big part of the reason we have the DIY projects in the book and I show how you can — there’s some things you’re not going to want to DIY obviously like a barbell and some plates. After you make that purchase, you can pretty much build everything else and have everything for around $500. If you’re willing to make everything, I would say, to maintain a good level of fitness in your garage without having the really fancy equipment.

 

Not having a rack of dumbbells but not having a rower or a GHD, things like that, just the necessities to really get some hardcore work done because that’s all I had for a long time and I was able to maintain a really high level of fitness with very minimal equipment and on a very tight budget.

 

[0:09:01.2] RT: Yeah, well I mean, again, I mentioned Brooks Kubik earlier and in his book Dinosaur training and his newsletter, he’s constantly talking about the old school guys. He also in his more current newsletters, no, even the newsletters he wrote back in the 90’s. He highlights a lot of guys that follow his type of training that train at home and again, the guys from back in the day and the guys today and gals that are training at home, the results they get out of this world. I mean it’s incredible.

 

For those who are listening right now, don’t think if you train at home that means you’re not going to get as good of a quality workout than if you went to a commercial gym, that’s really not the way it is. Tommy Kono, you take a look at what that guy’s accomplished, multiple gold medals in Olympics, world records in multiple weight classes and gold medals in multiple weight classes. He’s won the Mr. Universe contest, I mean, just unreal stuff and he trained at home in a dusty basement for the most part. So thinking that you can’t achieve tremendous levels of strength and power at home that that’s not the case. Go ahead.

 

[0:10:05.8] JM: I was going to say, yeah I mean look at those familiar CrossFit. Ben Smith who won the cross fit games last year, Rich Frowning who won the games four times in a row, both of those guys, well they do own their own CrossFit affiliates, a lot of their training is done in their garage gyms. I think as long as you know what you’re doing programming wise or you have someone who knows what they’re doing, you have the level of fitness or strength that you can achieve is just off the charts even if you’re at home.

 

[0:10:32.9] RT: Okay, so why is that? Why can you manage to get so strong at home and here’s another thing, I’d like to get your input on this. I mean, this is anecdotal but to me, I’ve noticed that people who train at home, they don’t have like a setup and they’re actually putting the work in. I find quite a few of those people tend to do better on average than the average person who goes to a regular commercial gym. Now, again, I don’t have any statistics or hard studies to back that up. But that in my experience has been the case with the people I’ve observed, I don’t know what you think about that.

 

[0:11:07.2] JM: Well you know, I don’t have any hard data either but I will say if you’re going to go the garage gym route, you are a step beyond a toe in the water with fitness. Typically, the people who do it and do it for long periods of time are pretty serious and I’m not saying like serious or professional athletes. They’re just serious at fitness at a minimum. Serious about fitness. So I think that they just stick with it a little bit longer.

 

You’re not going to really see the person who decided this year, that was their year to get fit and then spend like five grand on an awesome garage gym and that’s the way they’re going to do it, everyone else is going to get started somewhere else, whether that’s a CrossFit box or a Global gym but then after you get some knowledge under your belt, maybe you do go the other route, you find out you’re really passionate about this stuff and you know that you’re going to stick with it for a long period of time.

 

I think that once you get that sticking power, that willpower, you know you can really kill it in a garage gym by just being more efficient and actually being more consistent. Even if you are really committed to your goals, like I said, something about life, you just get a flat tire and you’re like, “Ah man, I can’t go to the gym today,” that’s not going to happen if you have a garage gym. That’s a really simple example but I do think that people overall probably a little bit more committed if they’re going to work out at home.

 

[0:12:26.4] RT: Yeah I agree, I also would like to add something that I think we’re going to touch upon when we start talking about the equipment that you recommend. I feel that one of the other reasons why people do well when they train at home, not only do they tend to be more dedicated, as you said, just the fact that you set something up in the house, thin in of itself kind of says that you’re a little bit more dedicated.

 

What else I find is that because you don’t have so much equipment, all the crazy machines and implements and you don’t have a lot of that stuff at a home gym, not that there’s anything wrong with that stuff per se. You’re forced to focus on the main exercise in a really productive ones, those are the ones that are normally done with the bare essentials and that’s usually the type of stuff that you buy to put in to a home gym.

 

All the other stuff is great but it’s all like window dressing and some of it unfortunately when people go to gyms, sometimes people will get really caught up with all that other stuff either because it looks fancy, it looks impressive, maybe the personal trainers are kind of trying to change things up to make their workouts really different than everyone else is.

 

Many times, a lot of these other type of machines and equipment and exercises tend to be a lot easier than the stuff that you do with the bare essentials. Therefore human animal, human nature tends to avoid pain, seeks pleasure and to kind of take the easy route.

 

[0:13:45.8] JM: We did some analysis on that actually in the creation of one of our programs because we do try to keep them minimal equipment for — because most of the people who follow what I’m doing are the garage gym athletes. They don’t have a lot of equipment and I really study anything that Louie Simmons puts out from West Side Barbell, any book that he writes, anything I’m all over it and dissecting it. Part of his conjugate method, we did an analysis on it and we found out that he uses a lot of special exercises.

 

And it’s actually when all counted out that we could find over a hundred different special exercises. I know Louie keeps some of that stuff under wraps, he doesn’t have everything reported publicly. We found out that we could do most every single one of, I think it was like 80, 85% of those exercises with very minimal equipment and garage gym in effort to replicate some of his methods in a different way. Yeah, I think even some of the best methods out there can be whittled down and done simply.

 

[0:14:44.7] RT: Okay, I think that leads us to the next logical question which is, what are some pieces that you recommend?

 

[0:14:51.8] JM: I definitely recommend getting a barbell. You absolutely have to have a barbell and some plates and what you’re going to spend here can really range depending on what you want but at a minimum, you have that and somewhere to put the thing. What I mean by that is unless you’re doing the snatch and clean and jerk and deadlift, it’s not great to have a barbell that just sits on the ground. If you want to do squats and bench press and strict press and all that other stuff.

 

I actually have a DIY project, it’s one of the cheapest ones. If I was starting over in a garage, it would be the first thing I built after I bought a barbell and some plates and it’s four by fours thrown in a bucket and then cement poured around it to hold it upright and you build two of those and you have a place now to rack the weight for bench and for squat.

 

So at a minimum, that’s it, that’s where I would start and I’d say if you’re pressing me for the minimum, that’s where it is. You could obviously add other things like apply a metric box, rings, parallettes and all these other easy DIY projects but the start are a very simple DIY rack, barbell and plates.

 

[0:16:00.4] RT: Yeah, it sounds like the Olympic weightlifting essentials, uprights and a bar with obviously plates. Like you said, those uprights, you want them to be adjustable so you can bench and you can squat and set the bar up on the uprights. Okay so why a barbell? Why not another implement like a dumbbell or something else?

 

[0:16:20.3] JM: I really like dumbbells because the stimulus you get with your limbs having to utilize a little coordination in balances is a lot more than a barbell at times but you’re just not going to get a strong — you can’t move as much weight as you can with a barbell. Maybe if we’re talking about bench press or something but again, you set a whole rack of dumbbells, those are really expensive, you’re going to save money in the long run using a barbell and things like the back squat and bench press. Snatch, clean and jerk, you can’t beat it, you can’t beat a barbell.

 

[0:16:51.4] RT: No, yeah, the example would be really simple, just imagine trying to squat max weights with dumbbells versus a barbell.

 

[0:17:01.0] JM: I don’t’ think I’ve ever seen that attempted.

 

[0:17:03.8] RT: How weird — what do you? Do you just hold the dumbbells by your side? You hold them in the clean position racked? If you do, well quite a few people with relatively short period of time can squat even just a couple of plates. That’s 225 pounds, that’s hundred and whatever, like 12 and a half pounds per hand. To get those dumbbells positioned up there, sure, I’ve cleaned that, that’s not an issue with dumbbells.

 

But to hold them up there and then actually squat and get, like be able to focus on your hips and your quads and really fatigue them before your upper body’s losing the dumbbells. Doesn’t really lend itself to very productive — to work. Probably be a good awkward exercise to do and would develop some good strength but if your focus is to really build let’s say a big squat, this kind of challenging to pull off with something other than a barbell.

 

[0:17:50.7] JM: Yeah, I 100% agree.

 

[0:17:51.8] RT: I mean, you could probably say the same thing too for a lot of the other movements. Now, that being said, I’d like to add something quickly. I think if you just buy a couple of sets of adjustable handles. The dumbbell handles that don’t have any weight on them, get your barbell first, that’s the key, that’s the foundation and then you can get a couple of dumbbells that you could just use the same weight plates you put on your barbell to put on your dumbbells.

 

There you go, now you have a set of dumbbells as well and you got the barbell, you got the dumbbells. Buying up a whole rack of dumbbells, I got lucky and I found a university that’s getting rid of their old set and I picked them up and I mixed and matched and put some stuff together and had to use some elbow grease and clean them up and had a couple of sets and now I got this awesome full set of dumbbells.

 

The reality is, with the type of training I do, I really don’t — it’s not like I’m running the rack on every exercise that I do. In terms of, again, I didn’t really pay all too much for them but just the space that they take up and the other thing that really, I don’t really use them all that much compared to again, just take up the money I spend on them.

 

[0:19:00.5] JM: Yeah, I think if you could find adjustable dumbbells which isn’t too tough but if you could and your plates match and fit and all that other stuff then I think that’s really good route to go and — because I really love barbell training and the barbell alone but yeah, dumbbells definitely have their place. I’m not going to say that they’re not needed because with accessory work and all the other, it’s just a completely different way and I think it’s awesome to incorporate that stuff as well. And if you’re lucky enough to find like a university shutting it down, that’s amazing. I’ve actually heard a few stories like that.

 

[0:19:32.9] RT: Or just upgrading right? They want to get rid of all the old stuff. There’s nothing wrong, it’s metal but they want to get rid of it, they want to get new stuff, “Oh okay, I’ll take all the stuff thank you.”

 

[0:19:42.9] JM: I could help you out here.

 

[0:19:44.7] RT: That’s a story in of itself how that all worked out but anyway, that’s for another day. The barbell in terms of best bang for the buck and the results you’re going to get in overall strength and performance and stuff, barbell’s going to outdo a dumbbell in most cases. Now, I really like dumbbells for shoulder work, overhead pressing, I really enjoy using dumbbells. I love doing dumbbell swings.

 

[0:20:06.0] JM: Okay, kind of like a kettlebell swing?

 

[0:20:08.4] RT: Yeah but like you swing it up overhead and lock it out overhead.

 

[0:20:10.5] JM: Got you.

 

[0:20:11.5] RT: It’s an old school move, those are a lot of fun. Yeah. Dumbbells aren’t great but yeah, 100% barbell is where to go. What would you say is the second piece of equipment to go for?

 

[0:20:21.3] JM: After a barbell and…

 

[0:20:22.7] RT: Oh I’m sorry, you already mentioned the uprights. What would be after that?

 

[0:20:26.6] JM: I would probably recommend rings.

 

[0:20:29.7] RT: Really? Not a bench but rings?

 

[0:20:32.2] JM: The reason I don’t recommend the bench right off the bat is just because that’s probably more — the way I train, I don’t do a lot of bench press and I didn’t have a bench for a long time and I still don’t do a lot of bench press, I do a lot of pressing and floor press but I don’t do a ton of just benching and that has to do with a shoulder injury I got a long time ago and whatnot.

 

I would say rings next after the uprights because of the versatility and the way I train, how much you can do with rings is kind of crazy. I really like for people to have those in their gym and especially if you’re doing what we talked about earlier if you’re going the, “this isn’t necessary, my primary gym is kind of my backup gym” if you’re doing that then definitely have rings where you can get some simple workouts knocked out in between going to the gym if that’s still what you’re doing.

 

[0:21:21.6] RT: Okay. Now, in the book, you talk about the great mistakes. Can you maybe give us one or two of those?

 

[0:21:29.5] JM: Yeah man, so the great mistakes, and this is from the first section of the book which I mentioned as getting the mind right and some people might even be able to completely skip that first section of the book if you’re super committed and you know what you’re going to do. I see motivation and accountability lacking for a lot of people and so that’s where I had to start the book.

 

So one of the great mistakes is that accountability piece of thinking that you can do everything by yourself. That is one of the biggest mistakes and something I ran in to. I thought I could do everything myself and that was my own programming, my own DIY projects, my own garage gym, never have a training partner, so on and so forth. But you need some sort of accountability piece.

 

Have someone else in there taking care of something where it’s not all on you all the time, that’s a good way to lose consistency or not see the results you want and ultimately fail at having a garage gym is not having some sort of accountability piece inside of your garage built into your garage gym training.

 

[0:22:39.1] RT: Interesting, okay. So just to be clear, accountability is obviously very important. You’re saying, again, if somebody is training on their own and thinking to themselves, “Well don’t you need someone to kind of push you, motivate you? What about spotting you?” Then there’s obviously the whole accountability thing. What do you say to that person? Again, we mentioned bench press earlier and I want to say this uncase we forget. Bench pressing can be real dangerous period and it can be especially dangerous at home, alone.

 

So if you’re going to do bench pressing, we talked about it earlier, you’ve got to have some type of safety mechanism to catch the bar, whether it’s a couple of saw horses at the right height to stop the bar from crushing your chest or just coming down on you or having a power rack, which in my opinion is one of the most important purchases you can make. Depending again on the type of training that you do.

 

With the pins going on other side to catch the barbell just so whether it’s slips and falls out of your hand or you just can’t lift it up anymore and it comes down and just settles on your chest. The last thing you want man is to be eat8ing a couple of hundred pounds in your teeth, in your throat or just literally just sitting on your chest and suffocating you. I got to say that, we got to get that out there. But in terms of dealing with these types of things like spotting, somebody watching you for proper form, how does somebody who is training at home deal with these items?

 

[0:24:04.0] JM: Just with like the accountability piece in general?

 

[0:24:06.4] RT: Yeah.

 

[0:24:08.2] JM: Or just like your actual training?

 

[0:24:10.0] RT: I would say both. Let’s touch on both.

 

[0:24:12.7] JM: Okay, so for your actual training, the internet is an amazing place these days and there are probably a million and one communities that you could be a part of online for submitting videos or getting feedback on your form and everything. So when I’m saying “plug in somewhere”, that’s kind of what I mean is especially if you’re not — I’m not saying perfected, if you’re not pretty good on your form and you know it and have had someone else kind of agree with you then I don’t know if a garage gym is going to be good for you if you haven’t even learned the basics.

 

[0:24:47.2] RT: Okay, good point.

 

[0:24:48.3] JM: If you are learning the basics at home, that’s fine but you’re going to need some sort of someone to check up on you and so, like I said, there’s a lot of online communities, we have one and people do this all the time. You know, they share their videos and get critiques and all the stuff to make sure that they’re good, they’re progressing and that they’re doing things correctly.

 

‘Cause to just think in your mind, “Yeah, I’m pretty sure I’m doing that right,” and then you watch a video of yourself or someone watches a video of you who actually knows what’s going on, and they’re like, “That’s awful and that’s going to be an injury soon.” I think it’s really important to get plugged in somewhere if you’re going to start the garage gym path.

 

[0:25:27.9] RT: Yeah, nowadays with smart phones and tablets, it’s so easy to record yourself and just upload it.

 

[0:25:32.9] JM: Yeah, if you do, just learn a little bit like play the YouTube game and do record yourself with an app like Coach’s Eye or I think it’s Huddle, you know, the two big apps right now are Dark Fish. I think there’s third one and you could just record yourself, move it to slow mo, compare what you’re doing to maybe like a professional, their form and how they look, some tutorial you found on YouTube and start there at a minimum to make sure that you’re doing things correctly.

 

[0:25:59.3] RT: Well here’s something I think is a probably good idea. You talk about saving money by not having to pay for gym memberships and depending on the type of gym you go to, it can get pretty costly. That money that you saved, you can put that in towards either honestly hiring a decent quality, honestly hiring a decent quality personal trainer to work with you for a couple of sessions ago through the movements and then checking on you like every so often.

 

Or, like you said, sign up for something, either online coach or some online membership and that’s not me trying to pitch anything guys, It’s just reality. Like you said, you can be training for quite a while thinking you’re doing things correctly and you’re not. Many times, the type of injuries that people do develop in training, they’re accumulated. It’s not like, it’s a catastrophic injury, you blow something out, it’s just over time, “You know what man? My back’s starting to bother me when I do this or my shoulder’s trying to bug me.”

 

It’s like, “Well yeah, you’ve essentially been doing the movement incorrectly in over just all the repetitions and over the years, it’s slowly accumulates, starts causing you problems.” In addition to that, you do have instances where you have a catastrophic injury that happens and both of those, more often than not, you’re doing something incorrect. If you save a couple of bucks, highly recommend you seek out someone who can help you train partner and watch your form and all that kind of stuff, that’s important, I think that was a really good idea. That was a good suggestion on your end.

 

[0:27:22.8] JM: I’m big into the CrossFit scene, that’s kind of where I got started and everything. I’d like to consider what I’m doing now more strength and conditioning than it is CrossFit but having come from that background, I do know if you really want some help, go sign up for most CrossFit gyms out there have basically an on ramp class and it takes about like six weeks to go through. Just ask them if you can sign up for that.

 

Maybe don’t tell them that you plan to go to your garage gym afterwards but they’ll take your money for six weeks or however long their on ramp process is. They do a pretty good job if you find a good gym at teaching you all the basics and the fundamentals that would give you a really awesome foundation to then take to your garage gym.

 

[0:28:06.3] RT: Yeah, real important. You don’t want to end up like — I remember when I got a motorcycle license and we got a motorcycle license on a 125 CC bike, then like the next day you can go buy like a thousand plus CC crotch rocket. In the test, in the course that we took, I don’t think we were allowed to go above I don’t think third gear.

 

As you can imagine, 125cc bike, I don’t care how many gears it has, it’s not going very quick. To have it limited to second or third gear and then the next day you can go out and buy like just a monstrosity that you strap yourself on to and you end up in trouble pretty quickly. Just because somebody gets the setup, they look the part, they got the clothing, all that stuff and you’re all setup at home, that doesn’t automatically mean you know what you’re doing.

 

So I’m kind of harping on this point because there’s no need to kind of waste that time and even if you don’t really ever necessarily injure yourself, you may limit your progress in general and your results in general because you’re not quite doing things right. With that being said, we’re going to go to a break, I’m going to come back because some of this stuff you actually address when it comes to setting up your training routines and whatnot. I wouldn’t mind getting into that as well.

 

All right guys, we’re going to be right back with our guest, Jerred Moon from EndOfThreeFitness.com, be right back.

 

[BREAK MESSAGE]

 

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[INTERVIEW CONTINUED]

 

[0:30:30.4] RT: All right guys, we’re back with our guest Jerred Moon, Author of the new book, Garage Gym Athlete. Let me tell you, I’m kind of paging through this and man, just to do it yourself section is worth it. I know you can find some of this stuff online but the question is, how good are the plans you’re finding online? And you got to go look for them. He’s got them all here in one spot and he covers everything from racks to jerk boxes which is actually really cool.

 

You don’t see too many of those anymore and those are awesome. Parallettes, Slosh Pipes, kettlebells, all kinds of cool stuff in here. Okay, let’s get back on track. I asked you before the break, I said, “What would you say to somebody who is training right now but isn’t really thinking about training at home or is just kind of starting out?” And you answered.

 

The question I have now is what about somebody who is advanced? Somebody who is at an advanced level? Now again, we kind of somewhat addressed this earlier by saying there’s a quite a few people who have done a tremendously well a lot of the top people have done tremendously well training at home, who knows, maybe we kind of answered the question but let’s get specific with it.

 

What would you say to people who are advanced level athletes, lifters, whatever they may be and they’re thinking, “Well why would I want to get setup at home?” What do you got for those people? Are they going to be able to get that effective workout at home, at the level they’re at now?

 

[0:31:47.7] JM: Yeah, and I think the answer to that is, “Absolutely.” Once we move more towards the advanced athlete, it goes away from worrying about your form as much and all the basic coaching stuff and it moves to programming and that’s probably, as a coach and programmer, that’s here I’m way more passionate. I think I’m probably like a mediocre coach to help athletes but I think I’m a pretty good programmer.

 

I think that it comes down to programming and what you’re doing to see the best results and I think the advanced athletes will have an idea about it but even advanced athletes, they might not know or they might not have to know exactly what the programming is because they could have someone programming it for them, they just know how to do it at a high level.

 

So I think learning some really basic principles about programming, that’s what’s going to get you to the next level if someone’s not programming for you. So I think intermediate to advanced athletes, training in a garage, the answer is going to be programming, focusing 100% on that.

 

[0:32:49.1] RT: Okay. So let’s talk a little bit about programming. I think, and I’ve mentioned this a couple of times during the course of the shows here, that programming is a vital key that a lot of us overlook. So when you first start out, you got form and you got the basics, rest and nutrition obviously. You can make gains following any reasonably well programmed routine, you find a lot of stuff online, you could buy books.

 

But eventually you get to a point where maybe you want to try different things, maybe you start to feel that you get results training in certain ways and you can tell that, “Yeah, I’m getting results on this program but I’ve tried a different program, it gave me better results and what’s up with that? How do I actually take that and factor that into my training and kind of personalize my training more?”

 

But it seems like programming to those who sit down and take a kind of a look at it, sometimes people think it’s very complex because you do see some of these training programs that are out there, some of these routines online and they just look crazy, I mean all the stuff that they recommend, tempos and multiple workouts a day sometimes, the type of exercises and this just has to be so many sets and reps and the next exercise has to be less because you have to take into account what you did before and it’s just like, “How in the heck can I ever figure out how to do all this stuff?”

 

And at the same time, you see some programs are relatively straight forward. I’d like to get some feedback on you in terms of what do you cover when it comes to programming and is this something that somebody can learn relatively easily, you don’t have to be a rocket scientist, and what they do learn, will it be able to take them to a very high level of performance and strength and conditioning?

 

[0:34:28.1] JM: Yeah, the people that I’m working with specifically, normally have two things, one, they want to see a really high level strength and a high level of fitness but they also only have an hour to train. So a professional athlete may have hours, multiple workout sessions in a day and that’s not who I’m talking about here. They can do their own programming and have plenty of people on staff to do that.

 

I’m talking about the other guy you know who really wants to take it to a high level but does have that one hour window to train each day. What we’ve done is, I created what I call block programming and kind of stole it from the Zone Diet where if you’re familiar with the Zone Diet, you eat certain amount of blocks in each meal and that constitutes your overall diet based off of your goals. You have so many blocks.

 

Block programming for us is time. Each block is 10 minutes long. There are five blocks for an hour which is 50 minutes and that last little block we called the invisible block because it always seeps in there with your rest times or your transition times or whatever. That’s how we program at Garage Gym Athlete is we have five blocks every workout and that put you at 25 blocks per week and over the course of those 25 blocks per week, you’re going to be doing strength and prehab stuff where you can accumulate 20% with barbell volume and then you can accumulate the 80% in special exercises.

 

We do general fitness stuff where you’re pushing, pulling, carrying, throwing, running and then we do a lot of zercher and accessory work to compliment your strength and we do a lot of zercher lifts just because I feel like they’re really important. We do metabolic conditioning and then we do what we call “the daily” which your simple exercise is like back raises, high rep leg curls, and abdominal work. In a nutshell, if that is a nutshell, that is what our programming template looks like, we kind of do what we call block programming and we fit those five different things into your blocks over the week.

 

[0:36:26.7] RT: Okay, so can you name the first two blocks you’re talking about? One of them was the invisible block, I think that’s what you said?

 

[0:36:32.0] JM: Yeah, so like I said, over the course of 60 minutes, there’s only five blocks, five of those are training blocks and then one is the invisible block and the only reason we call it that is because there’s obviously 60 minutes in an hour, not 50 but when we initially started testing this, every time we would try to do six blocks we would bust time on an hour.

 

So we just transitioned it to five blocks and that other block is just kind of, if you need to rest or transition or setup in between training blocks, the other five active ones, that’s kind of even your transition time is built in. So now, if you follow our programming and what we’re doing, it’s impossible for you to go longer than an hour and we make sure of it every single workout.

 

[0:37:13.6] RT: Okay, that’s really interesting to me because I’ve had situations myself where I look at the clock and I’m going, what the heck is going on here? Why am I in here this long? I don’t screw around my rest periods, I’ll set my timer where it’s a little less in the rest period so by the time I get to the barbell and start lifting or whatever the implement is, I’m right on the rest period.

 

So obviously I’m getting caught up at the beginning and the end, possibly at the beginning and end, warm up, cool down and transitions. Do you have any tips to help people speed through those areas? Obviously with the warm-up you probably have, which I should probably just ask you as opposed to guessing it. You probably have recommendation like look, you don’t really need much more than this to get a proper warm-up and same thing with cool down?

 

[0:37:53.5] JM: What we do, we never go above five blocks but we break things down into half blocks which should be five minutes, normally we have five minute warm up at the beginning and a five minute cool down at the end. Those are half blocks that will equal one block and we really, it depends on the workout for that day but we keep our warm ups short and dynamic to put it simply.

 

[0:38:17.7] RT: Right, okay.

 

[0:38:18.1] JM: It is what we do.

 

[0:38:18.9] RT: Okay. Do you have any tips for helping people with the transition phases because that’s one of the downfalls of not having possibly more equipment, that’s one of the benefits when you’re in the gym you have a dedicated bench setup, you have a dedicated squat or you have a dedicated glut-ham raise setup, you don’t have to literally set that up every time you want to use one of those exercises. What tips do you have to help people cut down on transition times?

 

[0:38:46.2] JM: That’s something that we tried a program to keep that in mind when we do our own programming is how is this going to transition? Is it going to take more than one barbell or people have to walk far distances and stuff? We’re always thinking about that kind of stuff but keeping that in mind, just looking at your programming, “I’m doing this many things today,” to keep the transition times low and just stick in your window if you were to turn your training into the block training that I’m talking about, there just needs to be buffer time built into it.

 

And so what that typically means is people are going to have to increase the intensity to decrease the time and still get the same results and so what you’re going to have to do is everything has to be time based whether you’re lifting every minute on the minute or what have you, that way you finish hard on a schedule at the 7th minute. Now you have three minutes before you should start lifting or be doing your next exercise whatever that is for the day.

 

[0:39:40.9] RT: Yeah. That is definitely, I found, something that you need to keep in mind, especially when you start doing different type of movements. I find the transition when you’re doing kind of maybe like barbell work, isn’t so bad for the most part or if you’re doing dumbbell work, it isn’t so bad. When you do or even Strongman work, it’s not so bad but then when you go for barbell work, now you got to go outside and do a Strongman and you come back inside, you got to do something else. That can cause some serious delays if you don’t have things setup correctly and you haven’t thought about the stuff ahead of time.

 

With the type of training that you recommend in those blocks, people are still — we’re not cutting back on the overall effect in the civil workout by setting it up that way and the only training an hour or actually its 50 minutes because 10 of those minutes is the cool down and possibly another 10 maybe is the transition times. Are people still going to get those results, the serious results that they want, let’s say they’re trying to be very competitive athlete or build to maximum strength that they could build or max endurance that they could build?

 

[0:40:45.4] JM: Yeah, I think that it’s very possible. If you can fit it, your training in an hour or if you have to that’s great. If you want to train more, you always can see more results after a different goal but I have the opportunity at End of Three Fitness to when I want to take a programming idea I can test it on the small group of people and then I can test it on a really large group of people at End of Three Fitness and we are seeing a lot of results with this kind of programming template.

 

Trying to make the best human being possible with a lot of strength and a lot of fitness, a lot of capacity and it’s working out. We haven’t seen anything dip off too far in any one category but if you are going to forego, I would say, fitness and you want to pursue the six or 700 pound back squat then obviously this isn’t the template for you, you’re going to have to spend your entire hour, if that’s all you had on training. Strength. We make it a really well rounded program and we still think that you could get like the triple bodyweight deadlift with sub six minute mile, still very possible following a template like this.

 

[0:41:53.1] RT: Yeah, I agree, you take a look at it in the past, a lot of guys, they train and they again be like animals and they would literally do hour to hour and a half sessions, that’s it and they were out of there. Hour to hour and a half, depending on their goals obviously. How many days a week do you recommend?

 

[0:42:10.5] JM: Five days and with two days off, typically one of those days is active recovery but essentially two days off, five days on.

 

[0:42:18.1] RT: All five days you’re pushing hard with weights or…

 

[0:42:21.9] JM: So the five areas…

 

[0:42:23.0] RT: Four because you said one of them is active recovery.

 

[0:42:26.1] JM: No, it’s five days training, one active recovery, which you can just do mobility or like a walk or something and then the other is completely off. So depending on your view of recovery I guess it could be six days a week but no, you’re not going hard every single day. Some days — because I mentioned those five areas that we hit over the course of the week and that’s strength and pre-habilitation is one. General fitness, the Zercher and accessory, metabolic conditioning and the daily stuff that we do.

 

Of those five categories, you’re not hitting every single one of those every day. It’s those categories spread out over a week and so you might have one day that’s just really strength based and then the next day could be a lot of metabolic conditioning where you’re just pushing yourself really hard. We kind of go in waves and keep the intensity in mind when we’re programming of rollercoaster ride of the ups and downs you know?

 

[0:43:23.5] RT: I got to admit man, I really like the idea of those blocks that you have in keeping people kind of accountable time wise and honest in terms of their workouts because you always hear, I don’t have time. But when you have a system in place, to make sure you get finished on time and all you got to do is just keep that stopwatch close by, that’s awesome.

 

Some people may hear what you just said, “Oh five, six days a week, jeez, that’s a lot of training isn’t it?” Again, you’re not pushing yourself balls to the walls. Again, a lot of the old school guys, they did three days a week on average, some two days, some did four days. On average it was about three and nowadays you may see a little bit more on the four side of days a week in terms of training. But again, these are like hour long sessions, hour and a half if you do them right, you get them in and get out quickly and that doesn’t mean cutting corners, you’re pushing yourself right Jerred?

 

[0:44:11.0] JM: Oh yeah, definitely.

 

[0:44:11.6] RT: When it’s time to push yourself obviously.

 

[0:44:14.0] JM: Yeah, you’re definitely pushing yourself and it’s almost — you can’t really have the stuff structured, I know you’re familiar with every minute on the minute lifting, which is simply you start a running clock, you have so many reps to do and you got to do that. If it takes you 30 seconds to do the reps, you only have 30 seconds to rest before you have to start again.

 

So it could get taxing but the way we have that stuff structured, the intensity is built in, so there’s no slacking off when we don’t want you to. On the lighter days, it’s a little bit more obvious that you have longer rest times, strength training might stretch over three blocks and so on and so forth. It all really came about because we had one of our programs we were running for people through and I was getting a complaint over and over there.

 

“These workouts are taking me like an hour and a half to hour 45, I thought this was going to be like an hour thing,” and I was actually really confused because we had tested the workouts and everyone I was testing them with, we were getting done in like an hour to an hour and 10 minutes. I was like, “You’re not being very strict in the gym, you’re not being efficient.” That’s kind of where this idea came along and I think a lot of people, they may not realize that.

 

Maybe you’d have to film yourself in the gym for an hour to realize that how much time you actually could be wasting and so I knew that these training sessions should not be taking almost two hours and that’s when we put these strict blocks in place and everything just started to work out from there.

 

[0:45:44.0] RT: Yeah man, I mean if you have 10 things that you do like warm up and your warm up consists of a couple of things and then you have the various exercises you’re going to do and you have your cool down, and if you just mess around for just two minutes between each one, you’re talking 20 minutes just like that.

 

[0:46:02.3] JM: Oh yeah, it adds up real fast. You got to really, there’s a reason why in the military they got somebody screaming at them to keep moving because people have a very bad habit of just dragging ass. You got to get yourself in the habit, if you’re not already in that habit to keep hustling and keep moving and one of the problems is, when you’re training or you’re in the middle of doing something, you kind of lose perspective of time.

 

So having something like a clock on hand or something of that nature to kind of keep an eye on it, a lot of us knows man. I mean we all know this regardless of what it is that we’re doing, you take a look at the clock, “Oh my god, that much time passed by,” or, “Oh my god, barely time has passed by.”  We’re not the best judges of time, I just mentally, especially when we’re occupied with something. To have some type of a clock, maybe something you hang on the wall, maybe you got something on your wrist, a little time where you got on the bench or somewhere to keep things honest. I think that’s really important.

 

Like I said, I myself, I’ve noticed how as my schedule’s gotten busier and busier over the years, I really start to realize okay, I’ve gotten to the point where, let’s say I have a workout and I’m doing an exercise and I’m going to start at the heavier weight and I’m going to drop down to lighter weight that I can remove a few plates and I’ll end up, whatever it may be, fives, tens, two and a half’s. Whatever it may be.

 

Remove some weight and I’ll be at the weight I need to be at for the next set. I don’t have to go screw around do the math again in my head and then put the proper weight, change the weight, take a 45 on, put another 25 and two and a half on. No, no, no. There’s none of that stuff, real quick, strip off whatever I got to strip off and I’ve already got it setup with sometimes quite a fewer smaller plates than what you would normally have to have that heavier weight instead of having four plates and a couple of small ones.

 

Maybe I have three plates and a bunch of small plates so that I could strip a few little ones off and I’m where I need to be for the next set and then I can do it again for the next set. I find that little things like that kind of help you but ultimately like you said but ultimately like you said, it’s that clock, that’s really good man, I think that’s really pretty clever.

 

[0:48:07.3] JM: And I challenge people to actually analyze, because I know for a fact with just training guys on strength alone, if I would say, “We’re doing really heavy sets,” or something and tell them, “Okay, just rest two to three minutes between sets,” something generic. Two or three minutes, if you’re not actually watching the clock, it turns into five to seven.

 

[0:48:25.9] RT: Oh yeah.

 

[0:48:26.3] JM: Now you’re looking at two or three hour training session, and all we’re doing is some strength work. Yeah, definitely people need to be very mindful of what they’re doing in the gym and realize how much time they could be wasting.

 

[0:48:37.2] RT: Yeah, I like all that, that stuff’s pretty — like I said man, real clever the way you’ve kind of addressed that, maybe it’s resonating with me because I’ve experienced that stuff before. Okay, so we talked about programming, you got some interesting things in there to make sure that A, people are hitting the various energy systems, you’re hitting strength and fitness and conditioning, all that kind of stuff. Prehab, warming up, cool down, you’re taking care of all of it.

 

You also helped them with block programming and you teach them how to do it in a manner that anybody can follow and become relatively adept at programming their own workouts. Now, you talk about, there’s a couple of things I want to touch on quickly here before we end off. Two things, it says, “A pro knows how to train alone,” it’s cool heading and that is obviously a skill set of itself, and then there’s another point after that. So what do you mean by “a pro needs to know how to train alone”?

 

[0:49:27.9] JM: Training alone is difficult and it goes way beyond just pushing yourself. I think having someone else there, no matter who it is, even if it’s a person who doesn’t work out at all, if you put him in a chair and make them watch you, you’re going to perform a little bit better, that’s human beings. So what I do in the book is highlight a bunch of different ways that you can get that stimulus, maybe not another set of eyes watching you but other ways to hold yourself accountable with training schedules and whatnot.

 

Things I suggest are things like regularly testing bench marks just so you always know where you’re at. I feel like people way underutilize benchmarks. I’m not talking about max effort list every time. I also don’t think that you should be maxing out every four weeks, I’m just saying, some sort of benchmark, holding yourself accountable there, also in conditioning, I always recommend.

 

If I was to tell someone to go do a conditioning workout where you’re running for 30 seconds — 30/30 conditioning. Run for 30 seconds for max meters and then rest 30 seconds and just you do multiple sets of that. That’s great, that’s an awesome workout, really great for conditioning but you have to have a meter goal tied to that. Meaning, how many meters are you going to hit every 30 seconds? Especially if you’re training alone. Whether that’ son a rower or maybe calories on an air dine, or meters running.

 

‘Cause if you don’t have some sort of goal, the first 30 seconds compared to the last 30 seconds is going to be ridiculous if you’re not measuring at all. Just learning little tips and tricks I’ve learned over the years from training people and watching them, training myself, training alone a lot. I put together a lot of simple stuff like that that could help people keep the intensity and make them realize where they’re at.You always have to know where you’re at, what’s your measuring stick and what are you goals?

 

[0:51:25.3] RT: All right, I like that. Again, it’s like a skill isn’t it? It’s a skill you develop, you learn little tricks of the trade here and there, don’t worry if you’re thinking to yourself, “Well jeez, I don’t know if I can push myself like that.” Well the reality is that you can learn little ways to keep yourself going and keep yourself moving along and chugging along and even again, breaking all kinds of PR’s, that can be done and it is done all the time in home gyms. All the time.

 

Many, many world champions were developed in home gyms, again, I just find it fascinating that with such little equipment and the fact that a lot of it is do it yourself and you cover a lot of this in the book, you can achieve some amazing things. Again, it’s cool that you got it all covered, you got the equipment covered including the do it yourself, so if people want to go down that route, you are explaining the little tips and tricks and make sure you get through your workout quickly. You’re showing them how to program their routines, you got to be kidding me, this is pretty much includes everything.

 

One other thing I wanted to ask you about how to do with pro athlete knows how to — a pro knows how to train earlier, wake up early, what’s that all about?

 

[0:52:30.2] JM: It’s just the fact of the matter is, you have to know how to wake up early. Most likely what you’re going to be doing is going to be done in the dark if you want to succeed and that’s either going to be a night depending on your schedule’s or just going to be early in the morning. I’d say for most people with a normal typical schedule, it is training early and you have to know how to do that. One of the quotes I put in there as from Jocko Willink is “Discipline equals freedom.”

 

That just resonates with me in so many ways when I heard him say that for the first time several months ago, is just “Discipline equals freedom” is so true. I think that getting a keystone habit in place like waking up early, it doesn’t just affect the time that you wake up, it affects every aspect of your life. ‘Cause all right, now you’re up early, what happens after you wake up early. Okay, you worked out, now you don’t want to eat a crappy breakfast because you trained and you’re more motivated to eat healthier, you’re going to drink more water throughout the day, you’re setting a better example for your kids, your wife, your family, whoever it is.

 

It really — the ripple effects of one major keystone habit like waking up early can go a really long way. That’s something I just point out in the book and think that everyone if it is waking up early for you, get that keystone habit in place and watch what it can do to the rest of your life, it’s pretty amazing.

 

[0:53:53.1] RT: I did read one time, something about Westside, we mentioned Westside earlier. Louie was saying that his morning crew which I think is 6AM I think. There was actually the strongest crew that he had compared to all other times of the day. Don’t know what that means, who knows, maybe somebody who is dedicated enough to get up that early and get to train. I mean it’s probably indicative of how much of an animal that guys is or that woman is. Goes to show you how much drive and determination and grit they have. Kind of make sense maybe that that’s the stronger crew. I don’t know?

 

[0:54:24.8] JM: Oh yeah man.

 

[0:54:25.7] RT: That’s me making a little, just an idea, not facts.

 

[0:54:32.1] JM: The thing I love about Louie is, he is incredibly smart but when e says stuff like that, I don’t need the science behind it. I don’t need some test done anywhere. If Louie Simmons is telling me that the strongest guy show up at 6AM, it’s over for me, I got you. Like okay, that just reaffirms that fact that I think you need to wake up early because like I said, anything Louie’s doing, I’m a big fan of and he’s obviously got some absurd training under his belt and experience under his belt.

 

[0:55:01.4] RT: Yeah, I don’t know why he was sharing that information but he just said, “Here’s the numbers for the morning crew and here’s the numbers for the afternoon,” maybe even possibly the evening crew. I don’t remember no0w which one it was but definitely morning and maybe evening. You look at the numbers and the morning had like a good hundred pounds plus in some of the lifts. Some I think was even more. Who knows.

 

[0:55:22.9] JM: Very interesting. I like that.

 

[0:55:25.1] RT: And I mean Arnold himself talks about how it was a big deal for him when he went to visit Reg park, his idol and how Reg Park came up to him at 4:30 in the morning, woke him up, he’s like, “We have to go train.” Arnold’s like, “What?” “Let’s go.” Five in the morning I mean they’re squatting 500 pounds, what in the world — who squats 500 pounds at 5AM. Reg’s opinion was listen, if you are going to be the person you say you are and life is going to get in the way, you’re going to be busy, you’r4e going to have a lot on the go.

 

It’s just going to get in the way later in the day and it’s also a great way to start the day. Jack LaLanne, I actually had an interview with Elaine LaLanne, his wife just the other day, she’s amazing. Anyway, she talked about how he would get up at four AM and then later on in life, he slept in till 5AM and he would get up, hour and a half weight session, half hour in the pool.

 

[0:56:18.0] JM: That’s awesome.

 

[0:56:18.8] RT: That was like a daily thing for him. And he did that right up to 94 right till supposedly he died I mean.

 

[0:56:25.7] JM: That guy is just crazy man. Love him though.

 

[0:56:29.9] RT: I know CrossFit, this is a bit of a tangent, people talk about cross fit and what the guys are doing in CrossFit, yeah, go see what he did.

 

[0:56:37.2] JM: Especially for how long he did it too yeah.

 

[0:56:39.1] RT: Right up till 70 you see some insane stuff. Some of the numbers that he pulled off, like a thousand plus pushups, 20 some odd minutes. A thousand chin ups. I’m talking to his wife, she’s like, “Yeah, the first time I met him, we booked him on the show,” and I don’t know — you know what? I think this is somewhat correlated because he did a lot of training at home.

 

Anyway, she’s like, “First time I met him, we were booking him for a show that I worked at,” and she said, “The person who said we got this guy, he’s going to come up, his name is Jack LaLanne and he can come on to your show and he could do pushups for the entire show.” I was like, “Okay, he did pushups for the entire show? Hour and a half show,” and then I said, “Was that continuous?” She was like, “Yeah, it was continuous yeah.” She said it like it was just whatever. It’s kind of funny.

 

[0:57:21.4] JM: Yeah, he was way ahead of his time I think that he did get his — one of the major moves he made was like that TV show he had and I think it was teaching people how to work out at home.

 

[0:57:31.0] RT: 34 years man. Until today, they were saying this, here we are, we’re all of a sudden talking about an interview I did a moment the other day. Anyway, his son and his wife they were talking, they were like, it’s a very basic straight forward program but he said, for a lot of people, especially for those who don’t have a lot of athletic background, it’s a really good way to get the fundamentals taken care off so you are ready to do something more advanced.

 

Whether it’s like a p90x or a CrossFit or something like that as supposed to just coming right off the sideline and jumping in and trying to push yourself with an intense program like that, you’re probably going to get yourself in trouble.

 

[0:58:01.8]JM: Oh yeah, definitely need to have some sort of foundation.

 

[0:58:04.1] RT: Yeah, again, training at home, people do that at home especially when they first start out. It’s not something new and it doesn’t make you weird, I think the way Brooks Kubik said it, it’s kind of like your own little gym setup, you play the music you want to play, you see who you want to see in the gym which is usually just you right? You don’t have to put up with any weird stuff, any weirdness. I look at it, almost like a lab almost where you could just run all kinds of different experiments.

 

Nobody could say anything to you, you could do whatever you want, you could press overhead, you could do Olympic weightlifting movements, you can — if you want to drop the weight, you could drop the weight, if you like yelling, you could do that too. I don’t really believe in like screaming like a maniac when you train but when you hit a PR, you got to celebrate, there’s nothing wrong with that, encourage that, it’s a good thing right? Raises testosterone. You could do all that stuff when you’re at a home gym.

 

Now, with that being said, we’re pretty much at the end of the show here and you actually have something for listeners which is the book itself and guys if you just go to endofthreefitness.com/sss for Super Strength Show. You will actually be forwarded to a page where you can get access to this book that we’re talking about.

 

But it actually gets better than that, actually let you take over here and just describe what will people get if they go there, exactly how this is all working? And guys, just so you know, upfront, it is an affiliate link, he just mentioned it to me today but there’s something important you need to know right from the get-go which is pretty sweet so go for it.

 

[0:59:31.8] JM: Yeah, so if you go to the link that he just mentioned, we are for the launch week only, giving away the book 100% for free. Digital copies of course and download it, read it, go through it and you’re going to get a 100% for free if you go to that link and then also after that launch week of us giving away the book for free, we’ll be starting a video series for everyone who signs up on that link where we talk about a lot of the stuff that we talked about today but we go really in depth in this video series, we talk about how to tackle the motivation and accountability.

 

What if you don’t have a garage gym at all? Where can you work out, some options there to kind of have your own garage gym by other places. We actually really go in and deep dive on the programming. If you like the programming stuff we talked about today, there’s an entire video of me at the white board dissecting this piece by piece where you understand it and know how to use it. You’re going to get access to all of that stuff, just go to that link and we’ll get you hooked up.

 

[1:00:34.2] RT: All right, so there you go guys, I wanted to be upfront that it is an affiliate link but the beauty is, in the beginning it’s free when he mentioned that to me. At first I was like, “Well Jerred, I’m cool man, I want you to come on the show because I believe in what you got here, this isn’t for the affiliate link deal.” But then when he said, “It’s free in the beginning, you get all this other stuff.” I was like, “Okay cool, yeah, let’s do it man, let’s share it with people. Take advantage of it.”

 

[1:00:56.2] JM: Mutually beneficial. Yeah, my goal is to get this book into as many hands as possible, that way for me, my perspective, I actually feel like while it’s not crazy, it’s just about garage gyms but I really feel like if this book gets into the right hands, it could actually change the life of one or two people and if I did that, mission accomplished.

 

[1:01:18.1] RT: Yeah, I agree completely, 100%. So much comes out of training, everybody knows when you train, you feel better, there’s reasons, a bunch of physiological and psychological reasons for that, you’ll look better you’re more confident. But in addition to that, there’s this level of self-reliance that you develop.

 

We talked about using the clock to make sure you’re sticking to the timeline and getting things accomplished when you’re supposed to get it accomplished, all of the stuff has a spillover effect to other areas in your life It’s tremendous, it’s just incredible the types of benefits that you get and you don’t even realize it just from working out. Just working out, are you serious?

 

But I mean it’s there, people have heard this over and over again, “I feel so much better and it has changed my life when I started to work out and actually stuck with it.” I believe it could take into somewhat of a different level when you are kind of doing it at home, not that you have to do it at home but when you’re doing it at home, it’s not, “I’m going to gym to check out the eye candy or I’m going to the gym and messing around. Or I’m getting side tracked and people are talking to me.”

 

You end up becoming obviously much more dedicated and serious. Not that it’s not fun anymore by any means but I don’t know, something different happens there. Not only that, having that setup at your home, anybody could use it in your family, you can maybe have some of your friends come over and you guys can do some things.

 

I know some guys, let’s say they’re really into powerlifting for example, they’ll set something up at home and they’ll have their buddies come over and they’ll have training sessions right there, boom. Again, a lot of times the vibe at some commercial gyms really isn’t for them and they don’t want to put up with all the noise and the rules, no chalk and no this and no that and maybe the music isn’t what they like.

 

That can be said for a variety of different ways of training not just that. So I highly recommend you guys check it out, I love to do it yourself section, there’s a lot of great stuff in there and like we said multiple times, you will be blown away at how far you can get with just a core, fundamental compound movements and basics and not just the barbells but as he mentioned, the rings and bodyweight exercise.

 

There’s these core exercises that you can do and when you’re training at home and you just have the basics, it forces you to focus on those and that’s doing you a big favor. Because that’s the stuff that’s the stuff that’s going to pay dividends. So anyway, with that I’ll get off the soap box, you got anything else you’d like to add Jerred?

 

[1:03:32.1] JM: The only thing I want to hit on after you said that last bit about training at home for family and all that other stuff is, I have two young boys and one’s three and one’s about to be two and something that I think is awesome is just them growing up around it to where when they go to other friend’s house, they don’t understand why they don’t have, you know, their parents might not have training equipment in their garage.

 

And they just see me work out outside all the time and everything. I just think the influence there is I’ll never force my kids to work out, the influence is going to be there to where they just think that it’s part of normal everyday life and that’s huge for me. So yeah, I think that it goes a long way.

 

[1:04:12.2] RT: Yeah, I agree with you completely, I remember in high school, I was at a friend’s house and we were up pretty late, it was pretty crazy man. We were up watching something, video games, I don’t know what it was but anyway, it was super late and then something like four in the morning, something like that, all of a sudden I heard some noise, I’m like, “What the heck is that?”

 

“Oh, that’s my dad.” “It’s your dad? We should probably kill the TV,” or whatever the heck it was we were doing, get the hell to sleep and he said, he was like, “No man, he’s going out to train,” he’s going to go for a run and then he’s going to come back and hit the weights that they got. They had a little very basic little setup like a universal gym, standard weights setup in the garage and I was like, “Really?” And I never really knew about that at that point.

 

That had an impact on me and that always kind of stuck with me and then all of a sudden I gave some stories while we were talking about this, I started hearing, learning about a lot of people, like Bill Pearl, Arnold, Reg Park, Jack Lyn, like all these top guys and gals they get it and get it done early and they also had the setup at home. Ronnie Coleman man, Mr. Olympia had a setup at home. He trained at a commercial gym but he also trained at home too. There you go.

 

Anyway, all right, I think we got the point across, Jerred, thank you so much, endofthreefitness.com. Garage Gym Athlete is the name of the new book that he’s got out, highly recommend everybody get it. Guys, don’t forget, endofthreefitness.com/sss is the link, you can access it and for that first week there, the month of May, you can get it for free. So I mean, seriously? It doesn’t get much better than that, you got also video series that comes after that.

 

Superstrengthshow.com, you put in Jerred Moon and you will get the show notes page, you could listen to the episode there, download it, share it with friends with the social media buttons, we appreciate that. Links to the different social media platforms that we are on and you can listen to it there but recommend you sign up so the episodes come directly to you. There’s an option to leave a review if you think we deserve it, five star reviews specifically on iTunes and you can also leave reviews on Stitcher.

 

They go a long way, they put the show up higher in the rankings and it exposes it to more people who get to benefit from these great guest, sharing all this fantastic information and in turn, what that does is it makes it easier for us to get guests come on the show cause they realize it’s worth your time because we have an engaged audience. That benefits obviously you. The five star reviews, they go a long way and each and every one of you who have provided us with one, we really truly appreciate that, thank you so much, it means a lot to us.

 

Show notes page we’re going to have links to all kinds of goodies including the link that I mentioned a moment ago to get access to the book, we’ll have ways to get a hold of Jerred, all kinds of good stuff will be on there. Also, if you have any feedback, good, bad or fugly guys, feedback@superstrengthshow.com, let us know we’ll take it all into consideration.

 

Also, if you have training photos, before and after, your home gym setup, hint, hint. Get Jerred’s book at a home gym setup, send it over to us at info@superstrengthshow.com, we love sharing that with our audience. When you’re on the website guys, make sure you take advantage of the free report. Sign up for the email newsletter and you will also get that as well. So that I think about sums it up. Jerred, thanks again man, really appreciate it you having you come on the show.

 

[1:07:14.1] JM: Yeah man, it’s a blast, thanks for having me on.

 

[1:07:15.8] RT: No problem man, no problem. Best of luck with you and I’d love to have you back on again man.

 

[1:07:20.7] JM: Thanks man.

 

[1:07:21.0] RT: All right guys, we always say, put this stuff to use. Until next time, train smart, train hard and we’ll talk to you then.
[END]

 

More Specifically in this Episode You’ll Learn About

  • From the Air Force to the physical fitness industry
  • Side hustle and training people to become better
  • What is The Garage Gym Athlete?
  • What are the benefits to creating your own garage gym set up?
  • Why everyone should have a some kind of home gym set up
  • Achieving an elite level of fitness with a basic $500 garage gym set up
  • The consistency associated with “at home workouts”
  • DIY Squat & Bench Rack
  • Barbell vs Dumbbells
  • The versatility of Rings and why they’re a great addition to your garage gym
  • The Great Mistakes – how to stay accountable and get feedback on your form
  • The importance of building a foundation for the basic lifts
  • Advanced athletes and learning the basic principles of programming
  • The benefits of Block Programming
  • Tips for completing your workout in 60 minutes or less
  • Keeping your eye on the clock and cutting down on transition times
  • Tips for keeping yourself accountable, bench-marking, and training alone
  • Learn why you should be waking up early to train

About Jerred Moon

Jerred joined us back in episode 100, so if you want to get a bit more context around today’s guest and his background, definitely check out that episode. To bring you up to speed, here is quick bio…

Jerred is a Strength and Conditioning Coach and creator of End of Three Fitness which specializes in simple, effective barbell-centric fitness for the other guy.

He’s a former Physical Training Leader and Fitness Program Manager within U.S. Air Force Special Operations command and he’s been featured in CrossFit Endurance, WOD Talk Magazine, Sweat RX Magazine, Life Hacker, The Huffington Post, The Art of Manliness and many other websites and publications.

He currently coaches and programs for hundreds of athletes from military operators to stay-at-home mom’s.

If you’d like to connect with Jerred, you can find him at EndofThreeFitness.com

Sponsors

FREE Report – Instant Strength: The one little trick that will instantly boost your strength by 10 lbs or more in your main lifts.

Success Quote

Discipline equals freedom.'' – @jockowillink

Training Resources Mentioned in this Episode

The Garage Gym Athlete – FREE during launch week!

Guest Videos

The Garage Gym Athlete

Access the book today!
7 Ways to Train Alone (and actually push yourself)


End of Three Fitness Training

Connect With Jerred Moon

Website
Facebook
Twitter  – @Eo3FIT
Instagram – @eo3_fit
Google +
YouTube

Check Out What Others Are Saying on iTunes! 

  • Awesome Podcast
    April 21, 2017 by Brooke Craven from United States

    Ray, host of Super Strength Show, highlights all aspects of fitness and nutrition in this can't miss podcast. Ray and his expert guests offer insightful and inspirational advice on how to live a healthy lifestyle!

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    July 17, 2016 by Pipiripiii from Spain

    Un canal con contenido muy completo e interesante. Gracias ppr toda la info!

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    July 9, 2016 by Charles M R from United States

    That Frank Zane interview!

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    Really glad I found this. Lots of care into each podcast, Ray walks the walk and really understands what is being discussed. I really just have one request- stop the Delorean story.

  • 51 and going strong
    June 22, 2016 by Canvas back from Canada

    I used to lift heavy in my late teens and into my 30s and then other thinks like kids,job, house etc took over and I lost motivation. I'm 52 now and starting to show the signs of aging so I thought I better get back at it. It was real tough. Slower gains, easy injuries, slower recovery. Tough to get back into the grove. While searching for some motivating pod casts I came across the SSS pod casts. I listen daily and I can honestly say that it has changed my life. It's more motivating that a gym full of people. I have learned more in 2 months than I learned in 20 years. The host is great to listen to, is very knowledgeable and keeps me wanting more. The guests are great. I look forward to listening. We have a wellness committee at my work and I think I have the entire group as fans of the SSS. Please don't ever stop!

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    Ray has some very interesting guests on here and does a good job of getting some useful information out of them.

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    Really. Smart guys.

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    I came across this podcast through another great podcast (the RDella Podcast) and I must say I'm hooked. I like the action items that are revealed for us to do rather than just taking in more info. I especially like that is simple but not simplistic. I'm 58 years young and shows like this reafirm that I'm doing the right thing. I use Kettlebells, Sandbags, Barbells, Indian Clubs and body weight in my training. I don't look like a fitness model but I feel pretty good. Knowing more and refining techinque has been very important for me. The idea is not to just listen but to do something with the information. The format allows that. Thanks for your hard work.

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    I love this show. Thoughtful host. Interesting guests. Since listening it, I have been giving more consideration to the mental side of training. It's a very encouraging show.

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    I started training at the age of 41 obese and intimidated. The guests are an inspiration and encouragement toto keep moving forward on this journey.

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    Love listening to this podcast. Amazing information and I always learn something from all the great guests. Thank you!

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    Some really cool guests that I wouldn't otherwise come across and Ray does a great job getting into their expertise. Almost always wish the show was longer.

  • I love this
    September 12, 2015 by Mvecdi from Canada

    Please don’t ever stop,i really enjoy it. Wish i found it before. I listen to it while working out or driving etc. Just wanted to tell you to keep doing what you are doing. And would love to see more of people like Mike Israetel etc. Such as Brad Schoenfeld. Anyways love the show, thanks for making it.

  • Very professional
    September 7, 2015 by Ayrshire Lad from United Kingdom

    Always learning something new from Ray and his well selected line up of guests. Sometimes feels a little repetitive as Ray asks all the tried and tested questions to ensure the listener always has a takeaway..its laid back but focused and very professional !!

  • I love this
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    Please don’t ever stop,i really enjoy it. Wish i found it before

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    I recommend this podcast to anyone that trying to physically and mental better them self in every aspect.

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    Some great interviews with a wide variety of people. I've listened to a number of episodes, and there's always some great information in every interview. If you're serious about strength training, health and fitness, or just want some good life philosophy, this podcast is worth a listen.

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    This is one of the best fitness podcasts. A lot of big names from various backgrounds and Ray asks good questions. He also knows when to ask follow up questions without getting too out of subject and having the guests share some more secrets

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    Ray is a great host and has a wide range of quality and professional coaches that have a TON of experience to share with you. Check it out!

  • Excellent interviews!
    July 8, 2015 by another anatomy geek from United States

    Ray does a fantastic job of asking articulate and interesting questions. I always really enjoy his podcasts and learn useful info! Keep up the good work!

  • has become the best Strength podcast
    June 21, 2015 by SuperHuman YYZ from Canada

    I think its overtaken superhuman radio and motivation + muscle as the top podcast for those who love physical culture and the iron game. Ray does a great job interviewing, just the right amount of interjecting his ideas and opinions. The guest list is incredible, the who's who, past and present.

  • The fountain of youth.
    June 10, 2015 by rroxanne from Canada

    Very good . I love the article. I listened to it 3 times to write everything down. Lol. Bad memory. Oh and love Rays voice.

  • just pure MEGA, Pig Iron all the way
    May 25, 2015 by Strongman1981 from United Kingdom

    The Super Strength Show is an amazing and extremely informative resource for anyone involved in physical culture. With an enthusiastic and highly intelligent host and a who’s who’s line up of guests, a must for anyone to sit down, eat grapefruits and enjoy. great work chaps

  • On another level! Once you hear one episode you will have to hear them all!
    May 22, 2015 by Chuck Osswald from United States

    Super Strength Show starts with top performers/coaches/trainers from around the world and chunks down all the important pieces, directed towards any audience. Ray Toulany is unparalled in his ability to make information easy to understand as well as tease out the unspoken gems. You will be glued to your speakers for the entire episode and find yourself eagerly waiting for more. The care put into each episode is clear with a show notes page that helps the curious learn in any medium. Keep up the great work and thanks Ray!

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    May 14, 2015 by HCF82 from United Kingdom

    After searching for an age to find a good strength podcast I discovered the super strength show through Chris Duffins interview and have been hooked since. The format is excellent with some of the best voices in the world of strength and conditioning appearing. No nonsense straight talking, this really should be one of your first resources to go to if you are a coach or an average joe looking to improve in the weight room.

  • fantastic
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    i enjoyed your session.looking forward to more staff.Victor from the Youngpreneurs Podcast!

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    May 2, 2015 by TEEJ888888 from Canada

    I just listened to the first two episodes of the podcast. It's really good. The questions are solid, there is lots of good advice for lifting and for life, and Ray does a good job at interacting with the guest but keeping things on track and flowing. Ray is articulate and the guests seem professional and smart. Overall, I'm very impressed.

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  • An absolutely ace show everytime
    February 24, 2015 by Tommy Eggleton from United Kingdom

    This show is phenomenal! The format and repeated questions for each episode keep the show driving forward, the guests have had ample time to prepare excellent and considered opinions and yet the show never feels like anything but no-BS conversations on building seuperhuman strength and mighty bodies. The host, Ray Toulany, consistently does a marvellous job of drawing out even more from his guests than the material they've prepared and some of the stories that are teased out are superb. I wholeheartedly recommend this to anybody that trains, thinks about training, or simply admires strength sports and bodybuilding in general.

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    For someone new to the strength sports like myself this show has been a great resource. Thanks for doing this show. It has helped a lot.

  • Paul McIlroy
    February 2, 2015 by Paul McIlroy from United Kingdom

    I've been an avid aficionado of all things strength and physical culture related for the vast majority of my entire life. As a former world champion powerlifter and trainer of world champions in different strength sports I can honestly say that Ray Toulany's Super Strength Show is an absolutely INVALUABLE resource for those wishing/needing to maximise their holistic understanding of strength, what it is to be strong, why that is important and how to best achieve it! The list of guests reads like a star studded "who's who" of strength and conditioning ROYALTY! Plus, more than anything the interviews are a ton of fun and provide a fascinating insight into the very best in the business and what makes them tick. It was my complete pleasure and privilege to be a guest on this amazing show (episode 37). If YOU claim to be serious about strength training and are not currently subscribed to THIS show, my honest advice is do so immediately...if not sooner!

  • Super Strength Show
    January 26, 2015 by Joeino from United States

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  • Excellent Information
    January 26, 2015 by TaylorrrrNB from United States

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  • by Brandon Richey
    January 22, 2015 by Great Work SSS from United States

    The Super Strength Show is a fantastic resource for all things concerning strength, fitness, and life. The multitude of guests provides tons of information and perspectives that every listener will appreciate. If you’re serious about strength and the physical culture this is a resource that you just can’t pass up!

  • Very glad I stumbled across this podcast!
    January 22, 2015 by rk102 from United States

    Great info from big-time guests in the strength and conditioning world. Keep up the great work, Ray!

  • Awesome show
    January 13, 2015 by Bonjower from Canada

    The Podcast is the best I’ve encountered in the fitness/bodybuilding sector. The host has a great ability to pull the pertinent information out of his guests. The topics are great and you seem to be able to get useful information out of every interview! Awesome podcast!!

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    January 1, 2015 by GameOverBoss from Canada

    The amount of info and resources in the SuperStrengthShow is just incredible. All of this coming from guests that are the best of the best in their fields. Great questions are asked to these guys and some really insightful answers given (along with a few laughs). I hate wasting time and i'm always looking to evolve and refine my training. This podcast has saved me hours of digging through the crazy crap on the internet to find valid info. It has also introduced me to things i would have never thought to look up. Really can’t recommend enough.

  • Master SFG
    December 24, 2014 by X-Fab69 from Italy

    Awesome Podcast! A whole lot of great and useful information provided by very accomplished athletes and coaches with an extended experience on the ground!

  • Charles C
    December 22, 2014 by CharlieConnely from Canada

    Very impressed with the quality guests that the Super Strength Show is interviewing. Loaded with with actionable and inspiring information. Great production quality and daily episodes!

  • Well done Ray
    December 19, 2014 by Matt McWilliams from United States

    Wow…Super Strenght Show Podcast is flat out awesome. Good production quality. Easy to listen. Very impressed Ray. Keep bringing it.

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186 Elaine LaLanne: The True Embodiment of Physical Culture at 90 Years Young

In this episode of the Super Strength Show, Elaine LaLanne takes us on her journey to becoming a legend of physical culture, a super wife to Jack LaLanne, and living proof of all that a woman can be. During our discussion, Elaine teaches you the importance of putting effort in everything that you do, so you can live a life worth talking about. In this interview, Elaine will inspire you with her no nonsense approach to fitness, stories of the past, and an infectious passion for living a full and happy life.

Collapsable Transcript

Read Full Transcript

[INTRODUCTION]

 

[0:00:18.1] RT: What’s up Strength Maniacs? And thanks for tuning in. As many of you know, the godfather of fitness, Jack LaLanne, and his 70 plus year career motivated millions of people around the world to improve their health. Well he didn’t do it alone. As they say, behind every successful man is a woman in fact, let me read what the godfather himself had to say about this.

 

If you were around her for any length of time, you will find her enthusiasm for life is contagious. She can do pushups, chin-ups, she’s a terrific golfer, swimmer and all-around athlete. She’s an author, lecturer, civic leader in fact she runs Befit Enterprises and jacklalanne.com. “She is super wife and good friend. To me, she is living proof of all that a woman can be.”

 

Jack is of course describing his wonderful and beautiful wife Elaine LaLanne whom he called Lala and we’re going to get in to what that is all about and the history of that. And I’m honored to say that she is today’s very special guest. At the age of 27, she was living on chocolate, donuts, candy, soft drinks, hotdogs, ice cream, and smoked cigarettes. That all change after meeting Jack. She did a complete 180 with her lifestyle and ever since then has preached the fitness message to all who would listen.

 

Today at 90 years young, Elaine claims she feels 29. She invigorates everything that Jack stood for, she has never slowed down and can still do full body pushups. She looks young, acts young, and inspires people around the world to be young at any age. She has written five books, Fitness After 50, Dynastride!, Fitness After 50 Workout, Total Juicing and Eating Right For a New You.

 

Elaine and the family are putting the finishing touches on Jack’s Autobiography and video documentary. She continues to preach Jack’s message through her lectures and personal appearances, she can be seen on the Jack LaLanne Power Juicer infomercials and his exercise shows soon to be online.Currently, Elaine has been working with Universal Studios to create the first Jack LaLanne physical fitness studio in over 30 years at the Cabana bay resort in Orlando Florida. You can connect with Elaine by visiting JackLaLanne.com. I started off by calling you Ms. LaLanne but I think you prefer me to use another name and we’ll get into that as well.

[0:02:43.7] EL: There is a story behind it. In other words — hi everybody. There is a story behind my name “Lala”. You see, Elaine LaLanne and one day I was being introduced by a friend and this friend was introducing me, “This is Elaine Elaine, I mean, this is LaLanne LaLanne. I mean…”  he got all confused and Jack says, “Oh, just call her Lala,” and so that’s how I got my name Lala. Now everybody usually calls me Lala and you can call me Lala too if you want, okay?

 

[0:03:17.5] RT: Thank you Lala, it’s an absolute pleasure to have you on the show. So if that’s what you prefer…

 

[0:03:22.7] EL: My son Jon LaLanne, they call him Lala too. So he’s here today too and he makes surf boards and he’s a cheflalanne.com. So he’s around here and so if you want to talk to him later, he’s here.

 

[0:03:36.3] RT: Definitely I’ll get in to it.

 

[0:03:39.8] EL: Let’s go, whenever you want to talk about, I’m here.

 

[0:03:42.7] RT: Okay, well how about you take us back to the beginning and let’s just go through a little bit here. But there’s so much to talk about your life, about Jack. There’s so many things that we can get into. His birthday feats, him having the longest running fitness show on TV. I mean there’s just so much pioneering and so many things and you were with him step by step, every single step of the way.

 

[0:04:02.1] EL: Right.

 

[0:04:03.9] RT: You were helping him along and doing that as well with him and I would just, like I said, I’d like to start in the beginning here and let’s just talk a little bit about that and let’s touch on some highlights because there is just so much to cover.

 

[0:04:14.1] EL: All right, well I will just highlight that I met Jack when I was on television and I started in television 1948 and I was an hour and a half show every day from four to six. Television was just beginning then and they were just starting, they only shows that were on in those days were late in the afternoon or in the evening and then later on when Jack when in 1951 and around that time they started coming on earlier in the morning at 9 o’clock.

 

However, I got this call from Oakland California from this gym and it was a physical culture studio that Jack LaLanne physical culture studio and this gal said, “I’ve got a guy over here who can do pushups for your whole show.” I said, “Oh boy, that will be great, we’ll just go over there and we’re doing an hour and a half show, we’ll pan over to him.” We had a 12 piece orchestra left over from radio and so it was kind of like the Today Show or the Tonight Show, it was on from 4:30 to 6. He came up and did pushups for the entire hour and a half and that’s how I met him and that was 1951.

 

Now, fast forward to, that was a little before 1951. In ’51 he started showing KGO TV in San Francisco and for a half hour and it was right after a kid’s show that was beginning. So he’d get the kids and he’d say, “Now, if you go get mommy and daddy, I’ll do a trick for you,” and he had a white dog  and so the dog would do a trick or he would do a trick and they’d run and get mommy and daddy and that’s how he started getting all the people to come to his show. So that’s kind of how we met and then I always tell everybody we danced in a company party and we danced ever since. There you go, that’s the beginning. That’s that one.

 

[0:05:58.7] RT: All those years ago, amazing. Now okay, you mentioned something kind of, we just passed over very quickly, you said he did pushups for an hour and a half, was this continuous or was he taking breaks?

 

[0:06:08.8] EL: Continuous and he did it continuously and then about a week or two later, there was a national show called You Asked For It and it was on ABC and the day he was on he did 1,033 pushups in 23 minutes on the Art Baker’s You Asked For It program nationally.

 

See Jack trained for endurance and strength and he didn’t think — a lot of people will do bodybuilding and they’ll do it just for strength and then they’ll lift all the bars but he trained for both, endurance and strength and also symmetrical body. He had a 48 inch chest, 28 inch waist and he had a tremendous body. Not very tall but his body was very well proportioned and that was his schtick.

 

[0:07:02.2] RT: I saw a photo of him I believe on the cover of strength and health and I think it was the strength and health magazine cover from years and years ago. Just like he said tremendous. It’s interesting that he focused on strength and endurance. Arthur Sacks…

 

[0:07:17.9] EL: And nutrition. I mean exercise — this is his his motto, this is Jack. “Exercise is king, nutrition’s queen, put them together and you got a kingdom.”

 

[0:07:30.4] RT: He has a lot of sayings like that. What was another one that he had? It was, “A moment on the lips, lifetime on the hips.”

 

[0:07:35.5] EL: “10 seconds in the lips and a lifetime on the hips.”

 

[0:07:38.9] RT: So many of them and they were fantastic. Just so much energy. He just had such a passion.

 

[0:07:45.1] EL: One more, “Don’t exceed the speed limit,” which is pretty cool.

 

[0:07:49.7] RT: I think he had another tip that I picked up from him. It was, when having a salad, I think it was him. He said, have the dressing on the side and just dip your fork in the dressing as you eat the salad.

 

[0:08:00.5] EL: Yeah right, yeah. And you still get the taste of the salad dressing but you’re not gobbling up a lot of extra calories.

 

[0:08:08.2] RT: Exactly because you’re not drowning the salad in the dressing.

 

[0:08:11.8] EL: Right, yeah.

 

[0:08:12.3] RT: Amazing. Okay, how much of a shock to the system was it for you when you joined that first class I believe with him and you went from eating like we said, the donuts and smoking and the candies and all the sweets to all of a sudden transforming your life. What happened there? How did that happen?

 

[0:08:30.1] EL: I was a swimmer in the Minneapolis Aqua Follies in the early 40’s and I was in pretty good shape and when I hear Jack, if you hear him, he’s so dynamic and he was so convincing that you just have to take a look at yourself so I took. He was to say, take a look at yourself, take all your clothes off and go in the mirror and take a look at yourself.

 

So I did, I went home that day and I looked at myself in the mirror and I said, “Oh my gosh, this sands of time are shifting.” That’s when I took a look and my chest was going into my waist line, my waist line was getting thicker and my legs were getting that kind of washboard look. And I’m like, “No, I’m 27 practically,” and so I’m thinking I’m really old.

 

Little did I know I’d live to this age. That’s when I said, he’s really got something here and I wanted to do it. I just wanted to change my habits because I wanted to be young again because I thought I was really old. So that’s when I changed my habits. I went home and I threw out everything I used to fry and I just did cut out white sugar and white flower and I didn’t need any sweets anymore and he said, “The only thing good about the donut is the hole in the middle.” So I was happy about the hole in the middle and I didn’t think about that anymore.

 

[0:10:00.0] RT: Okay, here’s something I’d like to ask. When people watch Jack, you could see quite a few of his videos online if you go on there and you can see his personality, it was very, like you said, very direct, very forward. Very positive, very high energy but he was quick to point out things.

 

Nowadays, there’s a lot more coddling that happens and people just don’t seem to point things out like kind of what he said to you, “Go home, go in front of the mirror…” to the class he said this I imagined, “…and just take a look at yourself. Take your clothes off and take a look at yourself. Take a hard look at yourself.”

 

Nowadays, you don’t really get too many people talking like that. Which way do you think is the better way of going about it, being much more direct? “Listen, there’s an issue, we need to deal with the issue,” or the way that they do it nowadays, much more politically correct and they kind of tippy toe around it and they don’t really point out issues the way that I find they did in the past.

 

[0:10:48.5] EL: Probably namby pambies you know? I really think, of course I grew up in a different era, and we are becoming I think weak because we’re being babied and we have to grow up. I don’t think we’re growing up. I mean I think we’re growing down. To me I think being direct about it is better than the other way.

 

Jack always says, “Life is tough, that’s like going to a — bodybuilding as tough. Life is tough and you got to train like you’re going to the Olympics,” he said. So people are really hiding behind the social media right now. It’s becoming little too much I think but that’s my opinion. I’m 90 years old and I grew up the tough way, you know? I wasn’t babied in the days. Wait till your read Jack’s autobiography we’re writing. We’re finishing his autobiography and you should see the stuff that he had to go through as a kid — I just lost you.

 

[0:12:00.0] RT: No, I’m here. I’m all ears. I think it means a lot though coming from you. You know, this is just your opinion but I think it means a lot and I’m just going to say it. I mean you are 90 and you happen to be a woman and this is your opinion about things. You’re not some 30 year old guy that’s just fresh out of the military that has his attitude.

 

No, no, no. What a lot of people would assume you’d be somebody who would maybe say the opposite of what you just said. It sounds like you truly believe that there is benefit in being much more direct with things and making things a little bit, you know, maybe a little tough than what they are.

 

[0:12:37.9] EL: I definitely believe and you talk to anybody that came up the hard way and they always say that they feel much better about life because they can take life. If you’re babied all the way, you know you’re going to be babied the rest of your life and you’re going to be complaining and you’re never going to be happy. “Life is a battlefield,” as Jack said. You just have to take what comes.

 

[0:13:09.5] RT: Yeah and I mean there’s truth to that, and at the end of the day, the reality is we’re competing with time and time doesn’t really go easy on us.

 

[0:13:17.5] EL: I think this political correctness really does hurt people because they’re not used to anything else, they’re just going to continue to complain, that’s my opinion.

 

[0:13:31.9] RT: Yeah I agree. So how about you give us a couple of examples of what you mean by the hard way versus — and let’s keep it, I guess, fitness and nutrition right now. What are some examples that you could give us between the hard way versus trying to make it the easy way. Just to kind of make this resonate a little bit more with people so they have some examples they can take home with them.

 

[0:13:52.6] EL: The hard way, if you’re having a time with say nutrition. It’s hard to — I’d have to think about this for a minute because the hard way, when we were young, of course it was the depression and people have easy time now even though they have television. We didn’t have television, we had to make our own toys when we were young. People don’t make their own toys anymore, we took a thread, a spool and we would make cars out of it.

 

When the mother was done sewing and we have to do our own socks, we have holes on our socks, people don’t have holes in their socks anymore or holes in their shoes. That’s the hard way. When we were young, we had to make our own as I say, we got an inner tube, we use that, we cut out the inner tube and make a rubber gun out of it and we would make cars out of the spools of thread and just anything we could get our hands on.

 

Today, you don’t do that. That’s the hard way. When you come up that way, you appreciate life much more than having things handed to you on a silver platter. There’s really no excuses for anything. If you were a person who is complaining all the time and you’re making excuses, you have to take responsibility for yourself. If you have a problem and you try to blame it on somebody else and it’s really yours. Own up to the fact, you’ll feel better about it. So I think I’ve expounded enough on that probably.

[0:15:49.6] RT: Now, okay let’s change gears a little bit here. In terms of physical fitness and nutrition, it’s Paul Bright, correct? I think that’s who Jack originally went to.

 

[0:16:03.2] EL: He was a lecture and Jack was in school and he was sick all the time. So they took him on the school because he was forever getting sick and there was a lady by the name of Mrs. Joy that lived next door to Jack and his mom and dad. Mrs. Joy suggested that Jack would go with the Oakland city women’s club. He’s 14 and a half and they just moved back from Bakersfield where Jack lived 10 years on a ranch, his grandfather’s ranch.

 

He bulked at the fact that they were going to take him to this lecture about nutrition and about. He had a goal and his mother and he walked into this auditorium at the Oakland City Women’s club and it was full. They turned to go away and there was a man up on the stage that said, “Lady with the little boy, we don’t turn anybody away here. Ushers bring to the seats and put them up on the stage.” Jack had boils and pimples and glasses and our supports and braces and all that sort of thing and he tells it, he just wanted to just curl up and die.

 

But he said, there was one thing that this man said and that was Paul Bragg. He said, “I don’t care what your age is, I don’t care what your physical condition is, you can be reborn again,” and that hit him like a big light bulb and he could be reborn again, and he talked about — Jack was on human garbage can and people were garbage cans when they eat all this stuff and it isn’t good for them. Jack just turned his life around and he went the —after the lecture he went to see Paul Bragg.

 

Paul Bragg talked to him for about an hour and he went home and got down on his knees and he prayed and he said, “Dear god, give me the fortitude to refrain from eating all this junk food that I’ve been eating,” and that’s — he changed his life and joined the local YMCA and he learned to wrestle and he became an AAU champion wrestler and there was a box at the YMCA. And these guys were going to unlock the box and they take these weights out and they lift the weights up and work around with his weights and Jack was enthralled with these weights and he said, “I want to work out with those weights,,” even though he’s 14 and a half or 15 and then they laughed at him, he says, “Hey kid, you’re too young for this,” and they made fun of him.

 

So Jack says, if I wrestle you and I pin you, will you let me work out with those weights and he wrestled him and Jack was like five seven, these guys were like six feet and he wrestled both of them and he pinned them both and that’s how he got to work out with the weights. That’s where he got his really start and then he watched Grey’s Anatomy and he read it cover to cover and he learned all the workings of the body and he started a gym in his backyard and he had the local firemen and this was, as years went by, he was in high school and he just worked out these guys, fireman and police men were to get in shape. They had to get in shape to become a fireman or a police man.

 

That’s how he started his — that’s what he wanted to do, he opened his physical culture studio and he opened it in 1936 in Oakland California on 14th and a street in Oakland California. That’s kind of the story and it’s in his autobiography that were coming out with. It’s also, we have an autobiography of him on Roku that’s streaming right now if you have Roku, we have a show streaming and we also have his autobiography on there, it’s about 45 minutes.

 

Yeah, the first modern gym with plants and mirrors and in those days, the people that work out with weights, they were bodybuilders and they worked out with clean and jerk and all that stuff. He is the one that really put a modern gym with the plants and the mirrors and it really looked nice. That’s how he started this. Then he went on Chiropractic College and learned more about the workings of the body. That’s why he knew all about the workings of the body.

 

[0:20:40.7] RT: That’s not all he did. He did so much more. He invented quite a few machines.

 

[0:20:46.4] EL: In other words in high school, the last football game — he was the captain of the football team and the last game he was hit and he had a big knee injury and the doctor said he’d probably never walk properly again. He rehabilitated himself with this knee and he invented the leg extension machine.

 

He was all over the world today and I have the very first one here. He took his ideas down to a blacksmith in Oakland California and he had that. Then he had an idea for, he had many other ideas and weight selector. Today you’ll find, you’ll have weight selectors but he had the very first weight selector, you select the weights, you’d pull up the weight with the pulleys. They had pulleys in those days but they didn’t have any weight selectors. So he’s the inventor of the weight selector and.

 

[0:21:46.9] RT: Yeah, just the weight stack right? With the pins.

 

[0:21:50.4] EL: Yeah. He’s got a lot that. A lot of firsts.

 

[0:21:53.5] RT: Tremendous amount and speaking of other accomplishments. Nowadays, there’s something called CrossFit and that’s a pretty big deal, a lot of people are amazed by these athletes and the things that they can do, they have this strength endurance aspect to it. Jack was doing things decades ago that are absolutely mind boggling and you just mentioned a few of them earlier with the pushups.

 

I’m going to read a few more of them off here and you’ve probably heard of this so many different times, you hear people bring this up but I mean, it’s just absolutely mind boggling that he did this. Here we go, here’s a few of them.

 

So He swam from Alcatraz to Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco while wearing handcuffs, at 42, he set the world record for pushups by doing over a thousand in 23 minutes, you had mentioned that. At 45, he did a thousand jumping jacks and a thousand pull-ups in one hour and 22 minutes. At the age of 60, he swam from Alcatraz to Fisherman’s wharf the second time but this time, not only did he wear handcuffs but he towed a thousand pound boat behind him as he did it.

 

What else? He could do — get this guys, there’s a pushups called like a superman pushup and some people know about this nowadays, it’s basically, just imagine a regular pushup but you stretch your arms way, way, way, way out so…

 

[0:23:08.1] EL: Fingertip, they call them fingertip pushups.

 

[0:23:10.0] RT: Right.

 

[0:23:11.6] EL: Then he could do one hand, he could do a pushup with one hand with his fingertips too.

 

[0:23:16.0] RT: In that position right?

 

[0:23:17.1] EL: Yeah. He could walk on his hands as well as he could walk on his feet. It’s amazing.

 

[0:23:24.9] RT: Well how about this one? At the age of 70, he swam one and a half miles, you want to finish this one? Along the California coast from Queen’s way bridge?

 

[0:23:34.3] EL: He swam one and a half miles, this is 62nd birthday.

 

[0:23:39.5] RT: I think this may have been. No, this was his 70th.

 

[0:23:42.8] EL: His 70th birthday. He towed 70 boats was setup, a person in each boat and some of his friends were you know, Jack never told people they had to lose in weight or they had to… he never told them what to do. If people were interested, he would go way out of his way to save them but unless you asked him, he wouldn’t go to you and say you should be doing this, you should be doing this.

 

Some of his friends weighed like 250 pounds in those boats and they towed him a mile and a half in long beach harbor, they call it the queen Mary mile in Long beach harbor on his 70th birthday and it was quite a feat. Jon, our son was there on all those locations and especially when he swam underneath the golden gate bridge.

 

[0:24:34.5] RT: The whole length.

 

[0:24:36.0] EL: Yeah, underneath the golden gate bridge. Jon would go down and you could talk to him later, you can ask him about it, about that.

 

[0:24:44.4] RT: One thing we need to add though, we’re forgetting something here with the towing the 70 boats. He was wearing handcuffs. His hands were handcuffed and shackles.

 

[0:24:51.3] EL: The feet shackle.

 

[0:24:53.0] RT: His feet were shackled.

 

[0:24:53.9] EL: People would say — yeah, his feet were shackled too. His feet and his hands were shackled and people said, “How do you swim with your feet and hands shackled?” It was like a porpoise, that’s all I can think of, it’s the way a porpoise swims.

 

[0:25:14.7] RT: Jon, if you’re there, this would be a great time to be joining the call.

 

[0:25:17.8] EL: Yeah. Jon, this is a good time. This is our son Jon LaLanne and he was there on all those swims and you want to talk about the first swim you did with him and how you trained for it?

 

[0:25:31.4]JL: No, I just want to talk about the first swim period that I saw when it was about 40 degrees outside and we’re out there on the boat in about, I’d say 7 AM, and dad’s in speedos and he hops into the San Francisco water with no wetsuit and we’re in jackets and pea coats and jeans, freezing. He did the whole swim when he was 60 with is hands and feet tied, from Alcatraz to the mainland with no wetsuit.

 

[0:26:02.7] EL: Yeah, and then tell him about the next year he swam underneath the golden gate bridge and…

 

[0:26:10.5] JL: Well he stopped because he said,” I’m using a wetsuit this time.”

 

[0:26:14.1] EL: Right. The thing is, when he was 40 years old, he swam underneath the golden gate bridge handcuffed and he didn’t have to have any certificate or anything like that in those days but now, he was going to swim underneath the golden gate again at 61 years old and now he had to be certified although he had done it before and all this and that. Tell him about the certification Jon.

 

[0:26:39.8] JL: Well we had to take the patty course. It was required to do anything underwater and dad and I went down to dive and surf in Redondo beach and I kind of checked on him about every 20 minutes during that swim. He swam underwater from Alcatraz to the mainland with his hands and feet tied, towing a boat.

 

[0:27:01.0] RT: Jon, just one second, I don’t mean to cut you off here but was he wearing scuba gear?

 

[0:27:05.3] JL: Yes, this time he was wearing scuba gear. That’s why we had to take Patty because he want to do it underwater. Well the water is really murky, there are sharks and I went down to check on him to see that he wasn’t bitten by the man in the grey suit, they had guys on the boats with guns and I’d go down every 20 minutes to check on him. Now his light went out at the very end and I…

 

[0:27:28.0] EL: Explain the light. He had to have a — from the boat they put a light down because it’s so murky down there. Because if you’re swimming and you don’t know which way you’re swimming. So he had to go straight across.

 

[0:27:41.3] JL He had to follow a light.

 

[0:27:42.4] EL: Yeah, he had to follow the light so he would be going straight across otherwise he’d be going all around and maybe swept out to sea, you know?

 

[0:27:51.8] JL: The light went out and at the very end. I cocked in the water and actually guided him into shore. I actually came in handy. We took the certification course together, it was really fun but doing it with all that gear on was just as tough as all the other swims and we actually had a really good time doing it.

 

The one when he was 60, when he had no wetsuit on, that water up at San Francisco harbor, it’s freezing up there. Absolutely freezing. Just the fact that he endured, that amount of cold water for two hours. Took ice baths, mom would give them ice baths to train for this feat.

 

[0:28:30.2] EL: Yeah, I had to go down in the ice house in Hollywood and get a big 50 pound bag of ice and I would dump it over him and he’d sit there an hour getting ready for that swim.

 

[0:28:46.5] RT: Unbelievable.

 

[0:28:49.6] JL: We go back to the hard way.

 

[0:28:52.3] RT: Yeah, big time.

 

[0:28:53.5] JL: It’s usually the most rewarding. The hard road is usually the most rewarding because you put the work in, you get the results but it’s just getting to do that first step and what I like to tell people is this. If you want to do something and it’s really difficult, you try. You just try, you do a little bit, then you go back and you try again and if you just do the action of trying, that leads you to the next step and before you know it, you’ve changed your whole life.

 

But it’s just getting through the first little step to make that change and I think when mom was speaking about excuses, a lot of people are honest. I’m a surfer, I was out in the water and there was a gentleman out there and he was a little overweight and he found out who I was, “And he goes, “I really want to lose weight but I can’t stop eating pasta.”

 

I go, well there’s your answer right there right? He knew it, a lot of us know it, a lot of us know what we’re doing wrong but we continue to do it. It’s the difference between making the effort and actually making it come true by baby steps or just a whole lifestyle change, the action of trying. TRY. You’ll find the real you if you just try.

 

[0:30:18.4] EL: Yeah. There you go, that’s a little story on the swims.

 

[0:30:25.5] RT: Okay, what we’re going to do here, take a quick break and I’m going to come right back. So guys, you’re listening to the Super Strength show, we have the lovely Elaine Lalanne on the call here along with her son as well Jon and we’ll be right back.

 

[BREAK MESSAGE]

 

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[INTERVIEW CONTINUED]

 

[0:31:45.1] RT: All right guys, we’re back with our special guest, Elaine LaLanne and her son Jon LaLanne and let’s get back into this guys, so much to talk about, so much to cover. During the break, we were just talking back and forth and here’s the thing. Jon, yourself, you mentioned prior to the break that a lot of times, people, they pretty much know what they have to do to achieve, let’s say their health or fitness goals, the example was.

 

The guy who was overweight who said I eat too much pasta, I got to eat less pasta. What do I need to do? Well, you just answered the question for yourself. A lot of people though believe that it’s very complicated possibly to get into shape or maybe what it is, possibly some people are looking for the easy way out, the easy button, some magical pill that they could take a supposed to doing the basics, eating healthy, getting some exercise in on the daily basis.

 

The question I’d like to ask is, was it overly complicated in terms of what you guys had to do from day to day in terms of your nutrition and training or were there certain routine or habits that you followed that pretty much anybody can follow?

 

[0:32:51.5] EL: Right. It was not, no it wasn’t. It wasn’t hard to do. If you make up your mind to do something and everybody says, “I don’t have the willpower,” but everybody has willpower because they get up in the morning and they put on their shoes and that’s willpower. Everybody has willpower but it’s being motivated and I think once you’re motivated then you can go full speed ahead. No, it was not hard.

 

When I made up my mind that that’s what I was going to do. I found out that eating properly was easy. It was not only more nutritious but it was delicious, nutritious and delicious. When you decide to make the lifestyle change, it’s easy. It’s not complicated at all but it’s all in your mind and you wanted to know about what habits that we get in to, you were asking about our habit is hard to change.

 

You can change. Jack always said, “You can change bad habits for good habits. All you have to do is make the change.:

 

?Okay, if you got a bad habit, okay, decide, well my bad habit is this, what do I do to change it? Well, you go over here and you’ll say well, I’ll change it and it’s the incentive that you have to change it.

 

People will say well Jack, do you like to exercise? He said no, but I like the results. There you go, that’s in a nutshell. The results are what you want and that’s the whole thing in a nutshell.

 

[0:34:27.3] RT: Yeah, actually that’s a really good point, instead of thinking, I just really don’t want to go do this mild jog or swim or whatever it may be, this hour in the gym. Instead of thinking that, if you focus instead on like you said the results, I’m going to have a body that looks like this or functions like this or feels much better. That invigorates you and if you just keep focusing on that, it will get you through the workouts.

 

[0:34:50.1] EL: That’s right, that’s right.

 

[0:34:53.3] JL: It’s like this. I was a little overweight at a certain point in my life. I had a 33 waist and I didn’t like it hanging over my belt and I went to dad. I said, “Dad, I don’t like this.” He says, “Keep your calories under 1,500 a day for a man, a thousand for a woman.” I got myself a calorie book and I actually followed through. Now, for anybody who is overweight or who is unhappy with themselves and they know what to do, it’s the lifestyle change. You don’t do it temporarily. You make it your life.

 

Take for instance. I am a surfer, okay? To do this sport, it’s one of the most difficult sports in the world to learn, okay? So you’ve got to spend a lot of time, you got to make a lifestyle change. I made it my lifestyle. It’s kept me in shape all these years, I do other activities, but you’ve got to make the conscious decision to go full steam ahead.

 

Anybody can do this and you think of the result, you think of the incentive. How are you going to look? How are you going to feel after you make this change? And like mom said earlier, health food taste good these days. I had to drink desiccated liver tablets with cod liver oil and all of this things but it was the most discussing thing and dad never forced us to do anything but he guilted you into it, right?

 

So I had to hold my nose and take this drink every morning and it was all this vitamins and it tasted terrible and another example is my birthday cake. Well they made a whole wheat birthday cake back in the 60’s and it tasted like it was the consistency of cardboard, it didn’t taste like cardboard, it was the consistency of cardboard, and I demanded a real birthday cake at my next birthday.

 

Nowadays, health food taste good and you want to read your labels. If the label has too many ingredients, look at the ingredients of freshly made piece of bread. There’s about six ingredients and then you buy something with the preamble for war and peace, those ingredients aren’t supposed to be in there. You want to watch what you eat, you want to watch how much you eat and make that change, it’s hard. It is hard at first but then once you see the results, that gives you incentive to keep going and then it’s almost like an addiction to get across to the other side. Hopefully that sets.

 

[0:37:20.9] RT: Exactly. No, definitely, completely. Again, I think coming back to what your mother had said, if the focus is consistently on the results and the results you’re getting and the results you ultimately want to achieve, focusing on that, that is much more invigorating than let’s say the pain of a workout if that’s not your thing.

 

Now, some people, I absolutely love going and training. I just absolutely love it because I know what that leads to. But just everything from perfecting the form to the way the body feels, your heart rate is increasing, perspiring, all that stuff is fantastic but some people again, it’s just not their thing but if they can instead focus on what the end result will be, that gives them a kind of like an invigorating type of energy to get them through it.

 

[0:38:07.7] EL: I’m looking at your picture right now and you’re in good shape.

 

[0:38:11.2] RT: Thank you very much, I appreciate it.

 

[0:38:13.8] EL: Jack would say, in his lectures he’d say, “You know my wife” — what did he say?

 

[0:38:19.8] JL: You’re in pretty good shape.

 

[0:38:22.4] EL: He’d say, “My wife’s in pretty good shape for the condition she’s in.”

 

[0:38:27.4] RT: Wise guy, huh?

 

[0:38:28.9] EL: He had a great sense of humor.

 

[0:38:30.7] RT: Actually, I met Tommy Kono a few years ago in Hawaii and at the Y, I was lucky enough that he put me through a little work out and he was giving me some pointers and whatnot and I was asking him questions about all the guys at the magazines from way back when. There’s somebody by the name of Brooks Kubic who wrote a book called Dinosaur Training and the reason why dinosaur is because the type of training he recommends is the old school method type of training with the stuff that Elaine, yourself and Jack, the type of stuff that you guys grew up with.

 

So I learned about all these people from back in the day, from Jack to, I mean there was so many people that he mentioned. Davis, Stanko, Shemanski, all these greats, Kono. So I was asking him. He mentioned Jack LaLanne to me and one of the biggest things he said was just the amount of energy he had when he walked into a room, “Hi, I’m Jack LaLanne.”

 

[0:39:24.6] EL: I know. Jack had fantastic energy and everybody loved Jack.

 

[0:39:31.0] JL: He wasn’t born with it though. He was given that energy through his lifestyle choices when he met Paul Bragg. He became a different person.

 

[0:39:39.9]RT: Yeah, I think that’s important to point out, because a lot of people nowadays especially, are very quick to think — because we get fed this kind of stuff where, “Oh it was genetics therefore it’s not possible for me if I don’t currently have it.”

 

[0:39:51.4] EL: As Jack, I’ll go back to what I said earlier, Jack keeps saying, “You can change bad habits for good habits. Change bad habits for good habits.” If I’ve heard him say it once, I’ve heard him say it a million times.

 

[0:40:06.6] JL: Somebody on Facebook said, it’s genes. I said, “Yes, take a perfectly healthy person, say me, put me on a terrible diet, put me behind a computer for a whole week and I’ll have big jeans.”

 

[0:40:21.1] RT: That’s true though, it’s very true. I think a lot of people sometimes because of either, who knows, the media, sports? We may see people at the pinnacle of athletic abilities let’s just say and fitness and whatnot and they think, “Well that’s not me and I’m not going to go win a gold medal anytime soon so I guess I can’t do it.” What a lot of people, I don’t think they realize is that “average genetics” can give you pretty much anything that the overwhelming majority of people want as long as they live properly and they do what they need to do on a day to day basis.

 

[0:40:55.8] EL: Really it’s not that hard once you get into the swing of it. It’s really an easy…

 

[0:41:02.7] JL: Once again, it’s a whole lifestyle change and you got to want to do it. I think dad one time was in an interview and somebody said something about the thyroid and this. He took a guy, the doctor told this gentleman, this student of his that, “Oh I’ve got a thyroid condition,” and dad took him, he took a hundred pounds off the guy. He just buried the doctor. The doctor goes, “Oh I’m sorry, you’re stuck with this condition.” He put that guy through the whole workout, the whole routine and he took a hundred pounds off the guy. What does that tell you about the thyroid?

 

[0:41:37.8] EL: Well, there are thyroid problems.

 

[0:41:42.7] RT: Yeah, for sure.

 

[0:41:45.8] JL: There certainly are, but this particular gentleman was told by a doctor and he had a thyroid problem and he certainly didn’t.

 

[0:41:54.7] EL: No. Thyroid problems, there are lot of — I have a friend who has got a thyroid problem and she really does have a problem. But I think if you watch your diet, it really does help. What you put into your body today is walking and talking tomorrow. You are a walking billboard.

 

[0:42:15.5] RT: Yeah, that’s good. You guys have so many great ways of putting things but I guess after all these years you would kind of figure this stuff all out. I mean, it’s very true. There’s a couple of habits I’d like to mention. I found this just doing some research here and I had this. I mean I saw this stuff years ago when I was reading about Jack and here are some things that I wouldn’t be surprised if you yourself did something similar. This is supposedly some of the habits that Jack would do on a daily basis and I’d be interested if you followed something like this as well.

 

So, lift weights and do strength training for 90 minutes a day. Swim or run for 30 minutes a day in addition to the strength training. Eat 10 raw vegetables, eat two meals. A late breakfast and an early dinner. Wake up at 4 AM and later years, he slept in and he actually got up at 5 AM and I believe those are a few of them. There’s some of the ones I found just very easy, just going online, you can see some of the stuff. Is that accurate? Is there anything you guys want to add to that?

 

[0:43:17.4] EL: That was Jack’s routine.

 

[0:43:19.8] RT: Well what was yours?

 

[0:43:21.2] EL: I always used to say to people, I’d say, “He rolls out and I roll over.” I say, I worked out maybe 30 minutes every day, maybe 30, not any more than 45.

 

[0:43:37.0] JL: You want tough? I was woken up by two white dogs every morning and then dad would wear a plastic suit in the gym and under that suit he wore a sweat suit that was soaking wet and he would come up and wake me up and he would ring his sweaty shirt on my face and woke me up every morning. So yes, he practically was out there every single morning.

 

[0:44:07.1] EL: Jack had quite a sense of humor and Jon’s got a little of it too, but yeah. What you’re asking us, if we did what he did? The eating, yes. But his workout was a long and tougher than I did and so. I think with my working out for a half hour, I did it nonstop, I put all my energy into it. So I think it has to do — put your hand out straight and hold it straight out, everybody can do this.

 

Okay, what I want you to do is bring your hand out and touch your shoulder and put your hand out again and bring your hand and touch your shoulder. Okay, now I want you to make a fist and now that you make a fist as hard as you can, make that fist and bring it up very slowly and you bring that fist up very slowly, now you’re getting resistance.

 

Resistance is the key to everything and that’s the key to a workout. So if you’re putting in that kind of effort into a workout, you’re going to get more results than you do just doing the exercise and not thinking into it and not putting resistance into it. Do you understand what I’m talking about?

 

[0:45:27.9] RT: Completely, yes. It’s a much more intense type of a workout therefore you can get…

 

[0:45:33.8] EL: Get the results but…

 

[0:45:34.9] RT: In less time.

 

[0:45:36.6] EL: In less time. Right.

 

[0:45:37.8] RT: Actually, arguably better results.

 

[0:45:40.3] JL: You’re asking if he’s rubbed off on us? Do we do exactly what he does? Not many people do, but how he’s influenced me, how he’s influenced my mother and a lot of people around him, it’s more of a thing of achievement. If I go back in my life, what I’ve achieved by being around him, he’s rubbed off on me.

 

So I don’t know if I can use this example but I’m a professional harmonica player. I took lessons at 27 years old and the diagrams and the routine to learn this thing were getting too complicated, too tough and I was going to quit. Then that night, I decided, “Well dad wouldn’t quit, I think I’ll just keep going,” just for some unknown reason and I kept going and going and I’m telling you, a couple of months later, it all came to me.

 

So even though we don’t think that we’re advancing, progressing, you actually are if you’re doing it, right? You can’t get worse, anything you’re doing. Not just working out, anything you’re trying to learn or achieve, if you just do and you keep doing, you can’t get worse. You can only get better.

 

You may make a couple of mistakes along the way but you’re going to straighten out because we’re like computers, our brains are like computers. We hold information, we store information and once you keep doing it and trying it and doing it over and over again, it becomes muscle memory, end of story.

 

[0:47:15.2] EL: There you go.

 

[0:47:16.7] RT: There you go. As you guys mentioned, not overly complicated. Building blocks you just build up with some very basic habits and just kind of go from there and all of a sudden, I mean look at you now, as you said, 90 years young, you feel like you are still…

 

[0:47:30.8] EL: Yeah, right, I’m still doing a pushup. I can still do a pushup not on my knees but I do it a full body pushup. So I’m very active and I play golf and I’m still doing what I used to do. I don’t have any — I don’t take any prescription drugs or anything like that. I just keep going.

 

[0:47:52.7] JL: Dad learned to play golf at 50 years old.

 

[0:47:56.8] RT: One thing I’d like to ask is, Elaine, as you may know, there’s a lot of — I almost want to say misinformation when it comes to fitness and nutrition advice for women. Crazy diets, routines that I truly feel are somewhat inferior where women if they just trained with more traditional type of barbell/bodyweight type of movements, they would probably get better results in some of the crazy stuff you see advertised on TV or on certain training systems.

 

[0:48:26.4] EL: You should have heard Jack, he would just shake his head when he’d see some of the stuff that they advertise. Right, you’re absolutely right. You see, the more a women exercise, the more feminine she becomes, the more men exercises, the more masculine he becomes. Jack always used to say that and working out with weights, you’re getting that resistance and that’s what you need. You need that resistance in order to change your body.

 

That little example I gave earlier was something that you have to think about, putting effort in to whatever exercise you’re doing. Also, as I mentioned earlier, “Exercise is king, nutrition’s queen, put them together and you got a kingdom.” Jack never — when he talked about exercise, he always talked about what you put in your body. “What you eat today is walking and talking tomorrow,” he’d always say. Those two go hand in hand. Body, mind and spirit too.

 

[0:49:32.6] JL: Sometimes we take for granted what we know. I grew up with the man but other people don’t know this information and mom may be embarking on a little lecture tour inspiring the women because if you look at what she’s accomplished, in my opinion, my mother is the embodiment of real feminism. She is a real deal, she walks the walk and talks the talk. I’d love to see her inspire some women get them on the right track, get them eating a little better and getting them active.

 

[0:50:05.3] RT: That was I guess the point of the question that I was asking her, the point I’m stating there. What advice would you have for women Elaine at a different ages that people go through in their life? So 20’s, 30’s, 40’s, as you kind of progress, do you think people should focus on different things as they go through?

 

[0:50:26.0] EL: No, there’s only so many exercise, basic exercises you can do. I mean I think what I do at 90 is not what I did at 25, you know? But I’m still doing the same type of exercise, maybe not as many, maybe not as hard, maybe not as — I don’t have that, I have to admit, as you get older you don’t have that, especially when you get to be 80 and 90, you don’t’ seem to have that strength that you used to have when you’re 25 or 30 or 40.

 

[0:50:58.7] JL: If I may interject as well, you see some of these shows on television like P90X, the Zumba. Well, they’re very advanced and what I would recommend to some people that are just getting into this, come to our website and get a Jack LaLanne show and do these simple exercises to segue, to lead into these more advanced programs right?

 

Because a lot of people get discouraged when they get the thing and it’s got all of this weird moves, watching the Jack LaLanne show, he had very basic simple exercises that anybody could do in their own living room.

[0:51:32.2] EL: Well he does them, he does — on all of his shows, he did something for every part of the body. He always think about what he wanted and that’s why so many people got results from his show is because he did something for every part of the body. We  had 50 of them on video, on the that five shows on each video. We’ve got all those shows going and if anybody’s interested they can check it out.

 

[0:52:00.6] JL: Those exercises are a good lead in to some of these more advanced programs.

 

[0:52:04.3] RT: Yeah, I agree big time.

 

[0:52:06.2] EL: Women are jumping around in CrossFit and jumping up and down on those boxes, I don’t think a lot of women, if you’re young, fine but I mean, a woman 60 years old can’t jump up on those boxes and run up and down the — there’s something for everybody out there. There’s the young people have their CrossFit and then the older people can — if you’re interested and you want to get in shape, there’s something for you, you just have to find it.

 

[0:52:38.2] RT: Yeah, I believe that that applies to not only whatever age you may be but potentially your personality and what type of things you enjoy. Maybe some people don’t want to be in the gym training with barbells and dumbbells, maybe they want to do something possibly along the lines of kettlebell workout or something that has to do with, like surfing, like what you’re saying Jon but there’s some type of physical activity that you can do to stay in shape that will work.

 

[0:53:02.3] EL: Walking and walking fast.

 

[0:53:03.4]JL: Some interest. What I always said is that for a brief moment in my life, I actually gained 30 pounds and I went into the gym and I developed muscle and then I saw a Bruce Lee movie and I want to trim myself down and that’s when I got into surfing.

 

Surfing does work every muscle in the body because when you fall and you get tossed around by a wave, I just brought Kyro Parry, one of the top fitness models from Canada, we taught him to surf, this guy is in great shape and he was so sore, he’s used muscles he’s never used before

 

The last thing I like to say is that if you’ve ever done a sport, if you’ve ever been a tennis player or a biker, go back and do it, you may not do it on the same level that you did but at least you’re going out and enjoying yourself, doing something that you love right? This gives us the incentive to stay active, maybe some people don’t like pumping weights, maybe it’s boring to some people, go out and play tennis if you used to play tennis. Just do it.

 

[0:54:02.7] EL: Walking, if somebody wants to start out, just go on a walking program. One of my books is Dynastride. Jack came up with that idea, Dynastride, it’s really when you’re walking, you use your arms up and down and put effort into your walk. If you put effort in everything you do then you’re going to get results.

 

[0:54:28.5] RT: So much advice, so much to get into, we’re at the end of the show right now, I hate to end this off. Where can we find out more about you guys? There’s the books, there’s the websites, there’s the videos, Jon, Elaine, can you share with us where people can find out more?

 

[0:54:43.7] EL: Yes, we’ve got a website, JackLaLanne.com and you can find out all sorts of stuff on that, we have — Jon, we have a YouTube channel don’t we?

 

[0:54:52.7] JL: Yes, I just put up a speed to dad’s some highlights and it’s Jack LaLanne Lecture. If you type in Jack Lalanne Lecture on YouTube, you can find it or we can send you the link, it’s very inspiring. Dad tells a funny joke and he sends a simple message, very powerful and it’s only about I’d say five minutes long. So we’ll shoot that link over to you, but if you type in Jack LaLanne Lecture, you’ll see him in a brown suit and you can find it. Take five minutes out of your day and check it out, it’s really, really, really inspiring.

 

[0:55:24.4] EL: Yeah, he has written…

 

[0:55:25.9] JL: He was a great lecturer.

 

[0:55:27.2] EL: Yeah, his last book was Live Young Forever: 12 Steps to Optimum Health, Fitness and Longevity. It was written by a forward by Robert Kennedy and that was in Canada. It was from the publisher was Robert Kennedy in I think it was in Vancouver I believe or something like that.

 

Anyway, it’s Robert Kennedy Publishing. I think he passed away so they don’t — it’s out of business now. That book has got everything in it, if you want to know anything about Jack and we’re working on an autobiography and as I mentioned earlier, Roku is streaming a video of his life and we’re on MeTV and Own Zone and we’re just trying to get his name out there so people know all about Jack LaLanne and I appreciate you bringing this up and…

 

[0:56:23.4] JL: Introducing to a whole new generation. Most people don’t understand that his television show saved a rich nation from poor health.

 

[0:56:31.9] RT: Very much so. Agreed. 34 years, that says something.

 

[0:56:35.3] JL: At the trade shows, people came up and we got an outsider’s view to the power that dad had over people in a good way. People came up from all over the world. One guy even came from Russia, he knew about dad and then the guy from China brought us that plaque remember?

 

[0:56:51.6] EL: Yeah.

 

[0:56:52.5] JL: It was really, really, really touching. I also have a website called ChefLaLanne.com and we did use the juicer but we also grew up with a blender. Dad was a pioneer of the protein powder, which will be in the book, and the protein bar. I have a site called cheflalanne.com. I sell healthy cooking ware on it. Got a great nonstick pan and I’m the mindset of this. It’s like, if you’re going to eat something bad, make sure there’s no chemicals in it. Eat the raw form of the — like if you’re going to do it, try to stay away from the chemicals. That’s probably good advice, right?

 

[0:57:31.8] RT: I would agree.

 

[0:57:32.9] JL: Yes.

 

[0:57:34.2] RT: Usually, that’s the stuff that tastes the best.

 

[0:57:36.9] JL: Exactly.

 

[0:57:38.2] RT: I’d love to have you guys come back on to talk more about the nutrition side of things, the juicing, the blending. That is something that I think has a tremendous amount of benefits for people. I think that there is some misconception.

[0:57:52.2] EL: Jack juiced all his life and we have the Jack LaLanne Power Juicer and that you just log into Jack LaLanne. Most of the power, it comes up, the juicer stuff comes up first. I think just put in that, he wanted to know anything about the juicer but anyway, he juiced all his life and he believed in it so strongly.

 

[0:58:15.4] RT: Excellent, excellent. All I have to say is for those who are listening right now, there’s just so much information that yourself Elaine, obviously Jon now, you guys are kind of taking care of this, you’re stewarding the legacy of Jack and you are still here Elaine and you have a lot that you can still give to people and people can learn so much from you.

 

There’s so much information, the secrets, all that stuff, they figured it all out, it’s there and the amazing thing is, it’s not just about how to get in shape per se, but it also focuses on healthy living so you have a long healthy productive life to truly enjoy it because unfortunately nowadays, there’s a lot of stuff that’s being pushed, that yeah sure, it might give you a six pack, it might get you into some — really look great muscular and this and that and the other thing. But it’s short term kind of stuff.

 

[0:59:05.9] EL: Short term, you’re so right. As Jack and Jon said earlier, lifestyle, you want a lifestyle. You don’t want something that’s temporary, you want something that’s permanent and change those habits for good habits, you’ve got it made.

 

[0:59:24.5] RT: Completely, yeah, keep them simple, stick with them, do them every day just like brushing your teeth, just like showering, I mean you do it every single day.

 

[0:59:31.3] EL: Just like you sleep every day, your body was made to exercise every day. That’s what Jack always used to say. It’s just simple. It’s as simple as that. The life is simple really but sometimes we make it too complicated and it does take a step back and look at it more simply.

 

[0:59:50.8] RT: I am so honored that you guys made the time to come on there. Elaine, thank you so, so much for coming on and I mean, it’s just, this is like a treat to myself and I truly believe that the listeners, having their eyes opened up to the world of Jack LaLanne and the Elaine LaLanne — it’s hard to believe the feats that he’s accomplished and I mean, even you saying at 90 doing a pushup. There’s people that in their 20’s they can’t do pushup. They got to do it from their knees. That just goes to show you guys what is possible when you follow proper healthy living habits.

 

[1:00:24.0] EL: Anything is possible if you believe.

 

[1:00:27.6] JL: And if you make it happen. Anything in life is possible if you make it.

 

[1:00:33.8] EL: You can make it happen too. So JackLaLanne.com if they want to look into our website.

 

[1:00:41.8] JL: Motivational speech is on YouTube, it’s Jack LaLanne Motivational Speech at an 80’s idea convention.

 

[1:00:50.0] RT: Yeah, what I’m going to do is, we have a show notes page where it has information about the show, I’ll make sure to put that video on that page so people can get access to it. So it’s superstrengthshow.com, you just put in Jack LaLanne or Elaine LaLanne and the show notes page will come up, you can listen to the show, download it, share it with others with the social media options, we really appreciate that.

 

There’s links to find the various podcasting platforms we’re on. We highly recommend you sign up so the shows come directly to you and you don’t have to go looking for them. We’re going to have all the information, all the bonus and goodies and whatnot that were mentioned during this interview here, we’re going to have them all on there.

 

Jon, I’d love it if you could provide some links for us and we’ll include all of that stuff on the show notes page, how to get a hold of you guys, where to find you guys, all that stuff will be there. Also, feedback, good bad or fugly guys, let us know what you guys would like us to do, change, see, who’d you like us to bring on the show. This was a really special treat today to have Elaine or Lala as she is called to come on the show.

 

It really meant a lot and we’d love this stuff. Feedback, we take it all into consideration. Any photos, videos of your progress, transformations, maybe your home gym setup, send it over to infor@superstrengthshow.com and from there guys, that’s pretty much it. Make sure when you’re on the website that you sign up for the newsletter, the email and just sign up that with there, you get the free report, it’s a fantastic report.

 

Truly look in to who and what Jack and Elaine LaLanne are. It’s just, it’s hard to believe some of the things they’ve accomplished and especially when you think it was such a while ago you guys were accomplishing these amazing things and nowadays we think, “Oh, we’re so smart and we know everything,” and the reality is, there’s a lot of things that we can learn from doing it the hard way as you mentioned and not being coddled so much, at the beginning of the call, to just very simplistic healthy habits that you incorporate into your life and just the dividends that they pay back and you get so much more than you put in, it’s incredible.

 

That’s the thing, it’s like, exercise may feel tough, sure, while you’re doing it but what it gives you in return is a multiple of what you put in to it. That’s another thing to keep in mind when you’re sweating away and grinding away doing your exercises sometimes. You feel like, “Ugh, I don’t want to do this.” Not at all. The minute you get a taste of the results for those who were kind of on the fence, you’re going to get right into it.

 

For those of us who are really into training, just take a look at the list of accomplishments. I only read a few of them before Jack did and I know they’re hard to believe, it’s like he’s a comic superhero. Truly, it doesn’t even sound true, it sounds like something from Ripley’s Believe It Or Not or from a marvel comic but he did them and he did it a long time ago and continue to do it right up into his 70’s. Just amazing.Thank you so much for coming on the show guys, I really appreciate it.

 

[1:03:33.9] JL: You did a very good job here, a very good interviewer and you were very well spoken.

 

[1:03:38.2] EL: Yes and you’re very handsome and boy you really work out, I can tell you. His muscles are bulging. He’s got some guns.

 

[1:03:48.2] RT: He’s got some guns, well a part of that I must say is because I’ve been influenced and I’m not just saying this, I’m very serious, heavily by Jack and obviously his contemporaries as well but I mean Jack LaLanne has been a really big inspiration for me when it comes to training. Jack LaLanne, Reg Park is another one who really sticks out for me but just incredible and then just the longevity for me is just really important. Thank you guys, I really appreciate it. I’m trying not to blush here, I guess at the end of the mic and I just love your energy. I really do. I’d love to have you come back on.

 

[1:04:18.4] EL: Okay, thank you, thanks so much Ray.

 

[1:04:20.8] RT: No problem.

 

[1:04:23.0] EL: God bless.

 

[1:04:23.9] RT: Thank you, same to you, god bless you guys as well. Okay guys, as I always like to say, put this stuff to use and until next time, train hard and train smart, we’ll talk to you then.
[END]

 

More Specifically in this Episode You’ll Learn About

  • Elaine tells the story of how her and Jack LaLanne met
  • Jack doing push-ups for an hour and a half continuously
  • Jack doing both strength and endurance training
  • Exercise is king, nutrition is queen, put them together and you’ve got a kingdom
  • 10 seconds on the lips and a lifetime on the hips
  • The only thing good about a donut is the hole in the middle
  • Stop being a baby and grow up!
  • Take responsibility for yourself
  • Discover how you can be reborn again
  • Elaine speaks about Jack’s inventions including the first leg extension machine and the weight selectors used in cable machines
  • Elaine shares some of Jack’s world famous accomplishments and how he trained for them
  • The hard road is usually the most rewarding
  • If you want to do something, just try and keep doing it and eventually you’ll get results
  • Make up your mind and motivate yourself to create change in your life
  • The importance of focusing on the results
  • What you eat today is walking and talking tomorrow
  • If you just do, you can’t get any worse, you can only get better.
  • The way you do anything is the way you do everything

About Elaine LaLanne

As many of you know, “The Godfather of Fitness”, Jack LaLanne and his 70 plus year career, motivated millions of people around the world to improve their health. Well, he didn’t do it alone! As they say, behind every successful man is a woman…

In fact, here’s what the Godfather himself has to say about this…

“If you are around her for any length of time, you will find her enthusiasm for life is contagious. She can do push-ups, chinups, she’s a terrific golfer, swimmer, and all around athlete. She’s an author, lecturer, civic leader, in fact – she runs BeFit Enterprises and JackLaLanne.com. She is a super wife and good friend. To me, she is living proof of all that a woman can be.”

Jack is, of course, describing his wonderful and beautiful wife, Elaine LaLanne, whom he called “LaLa,” and I’m honored to say that she is today’s very special guest

At the age of 27, she was living on chocolate donuts, candy, soft drinks, hot dogs, ice cream and smoked cigarettes. That all changed after meeting Jack.

She did a 180 with her lifestyle and ever since then has preached the fitness message to all who would listen.

Today, at 90 years young, Elaine claims she feels 29. She invigorates everything Jack stood for. She has never slowed down and can still do full body pushups. She looks young, acts young, and inspires people around the world to be young at any age.

She has written 5 books, Fitness after 50, Dynastride, Fitness after 50 Workout, Total Juicing, and Eating Right for a New You.  

Elaine and the family are putting the finishing touches on Jack’s Autobiography and video documentary.

She continues to preach Jack’s message through her lectures and personal appearances.

She can be seen on the Jack LaLanne Power Juicer infomercials and his exercise shows soon to be online.

Currently, Elaine has been working with Universal Studios to create the first Jack LaLanne Physical Fitness Studio in over thirty years at the Cabana Bay Resort in Orlando, Florida.

You can connect with Elaine by visiting JackLaLanne.com

Sponsors

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Success Quote

Elaine LaLanne - Physical Culture Legend - Super Strength Show - Quote1

 

Elaine LaLanne - Physical Culture Legend - Super Strength Show - Quote2

 

Elaine LaLanne - Physical Culture Legend - Super Strength Show - Quote3

 

Elaine LaLanne - Physical Culture Legend - Super Strength Show - Quote4

Jack LaLanne Feats of Strength

Jack LaLanne - Feats of Strength

Training Resources Mentioned in this Episode

Live Young Forever by Jack LaLanne

Guest Videos

Elaine LaLanne – The First Lady of Physical Fitness


Jack LaLanne motivational speech at 80’s IDEA convention. MUST WATCH.

Connect With Elaine LaLanne

Website
Facebook
Twitter  – @TheJackLaLanne
Instagram – @officialelainelalanne
MeTV
Roku
YouTube

Check Out What Others Are Saying on iTunes! 

  • Awesome Podcast
    April 21, 2017 by Brooke Craven from United States

    Ray, host of Super Strength Show, highlights all aspects of fitness and nutrition in this can't miss podcast. Ray and his expert guests offer insightful and inspirational advice on how to live a healthy lifestyle!

  • Un canal de lo mejorcito en la materia
    July 17, 2016 by Pipiripiii from Spain

    Un canal con contenido muy completo e interesante. Gracias ppr toda la info!

  • Informative, deep and instructional
    July 9, 2016 by Charles M R from United States

    That Frank Zane interview!

  • awesome fitness podcast and great variety
    July 7, 2016 by jskoosh71 from United States

    Really glad I found this. Lots of care into each podcast, Ray walks the walk and really understands what is being discussed. I really just have one request- stop the Delorean story.

  • 51 and going strong
    June 22, 2016 by Canvas back from Canada

    I used to lift heavy in my late teens and into my 30s and then other thinks like kids,job, house etc took over and I lost motivation. I'm 52 now and starting to show the signs of aging so I thought I better get back at it. It was real tough. Slower gains, easy injuries, slower recovery. Tough to get back into the grove. While searching for some motivating pod casts I came across the SSS pod casts. I listen daily and I can honestly say that it has changed my life. It's more motivating that a gym full of people. I have learned more in 2 months than I learned in 20 years. The host is great to listen to, is very knowledgeable and keeps me wanting more. The guests are great. I look forward to listening. We have a wellness committee at my work and I think I have the entire group as fans of the SSS. Please don't ever stop!

  • Physical Autonomy = Personal Liberty
    June 18, 2016 by Mrsborch from United States

    Ryan inspires me to change my fitness mindset from just doing more reps to creating a body to live the life I want.

  • Lucky find
    May 16, 2016 by Keith3187 from United States

    Stumbled upon this podcast and very glad I did, fantastic guests with tons of evidence based information, highly recommended.

  • Tier 1
    May 14, 2016 by Dragon 1-5 from United States

    Truly a great pod cast very informative and 100% applicable.

  • Great interviews
    May 5, 2016 by Adamdv18 from United States

    Ray has some very interesting guests on here and does a good job of getting some useful information out of them.

  • Intelligent, interesting interviews
    March 25, 2016 by Clown puncher 5000 from United States

    Really. Smart guys.

  • Killer Podcast
    February 26, 2016 by RidgeWC from United States

    Ray puts out a really great show—every episode is top quality!

  • Great work!
    January 14, 2016 by NotMattDamon from Canada

    Impressed by the content and guest - keep up the great work!

  • THE Super Strength Show
    December 14, 2015 by Oastorga from United States

    I came across this podcast through another great podcast (the RDella Podcast) and I must say I'm hooked. I like the action items that are revealed for us to do rather than just taking in more info. I especially like that is simple but not simplistic. I'm 58 years young and shows like this reafirm that I'm doing the right thing. I use Kettlebells, Sandbags, Barbells, Indian Clubs and body weight in my training. I don't look like a fitness model but I feel pretty good. Knowing more and refining techinque has been very important for me. The idea is not to just listen but to do something with the information. The format allows that. Thanks for your hard work.

  • BOOM!
    December 1, 2015 by Getusomemore from United States

    I listened to the entire interview with Danny Kavadlo while I was cooking dinner. VERY good podcast! I give it a ?!!

  • Highly recommend this show
    November 30, 2015 by Altruistic? from United States

    I love this show. Thoughtful host. Interesting guests. Since listening it, I have been giving more consideration to the mental side of training. It's a very encouraging show.

  • Great show!
    November 14, 2015 by Rmolson from United States

    I started training at the age of 41 obese and intimidated. The guests are an inspiration and encouragement toto keep moving forward on this journey.

  • Amazing Content
    November 13, 2015 by MattTucker93 from Canada

    Love listening to this podcast. Amazing information and I always learn something from all the great guests. Thank you!

  • Great show
    September 15, 2015 by unadjective from United States

    Some really cool guests that I wouldn't otherwise come across and Ray does a great job getting into their expertise. Almost always wish the show was longer.

  • I love this
    September 12, 2015 by Mvecdi from Canada

    Please don’t ever stop,i really enjoy it. Wish i found it before. I listen to it while working out or driving etc. Just wanted to tell you to keep doing what you are doing. And would love to see more of people like Mike Israetel etc. Such as Brad Schoenfeld. Anyways love the show, thanks for making it.

  • Very professional
    September 7, 2015 by Ayrshire Lad from United Kingdom

    Always learning something new from Ray and his well selected line up of guests. Sometimes feels a little repetitive as Ray asks all the tried and tested questions to ensure the listener always has a takeaway..its laid back but focused and very professional !!

  • I love this
    September 3, 2015 by Mvecdi from Canada

    Please don’t ever stop,i really enjoy it. Wish i found it before

  • The best podcast in the strength/ fitness industry!
    August 28, 2015 by Powerlifting101 from Canada

    I recommend this podcast to anyone that trying to physically and mental better them self in every aspect.

  • Excellent Resource
    July 25, 2015 by J. Steinmann from United States

    Some great interviews with a wide variety of people. I've listened to a number of episodes, and there's always some great information in every interview. If you're serious about strength training, health and fitness, or just want some good life philosophy, this podcast is worth a listen.

  • Must subscribe!
    July 9, 2015 by Roddygo from United States

    This is one of the best fitness podcasts. A lot of big names from various backgrounds and Ray asks good questions. He also knows when to ask follow up questions without getting too out of subject and having the guests share some more secrets

  • Great Show!
    July 8, 2015 by Wes Kennedy from Canada

    Ray is a great host and has a wide range of quality and professional coaches that have a TON of experience to share with you. Check it out!

  • Excellent interviews!
    July 8, 2015 by another anatomy geek from United States

    Ray does a fantastic job of asking articulate and interesting questions. I always really enjoy his podcasts and learn useful info! Keep up the good work!

  • has become the best Strength podcast
    June 21, 2015 by SuperHuman YYZ from Canada

    I think its overtaken superhuman radio and motivation + muscle as the top podcast for those who love physical culture and the iron game. Ray does a great job interviewing, just the right amount of interjecting his ideas and opinions. The guest list is incredible, the who's who, past and present.

  • The fountain of youth.
    June 10, 2015 by rroxanne from Canada

    Very good . I love the article. I listened to it 3 times to write everything down. Lol. Bad memory. Oh and love Rays voice.

  • just pure MEGA, Pig Iron all the way
    May 25, 2015 by Strongman1981 from United Kingdom

    The Super Strength Show is an amazing and extremely informative resource for anyone involved in physical culture. With an enthusiastic and highly intelligent host and a who’s who’s line up of guests, a must for anyone to sit down, eat grapefruits and enjoy. great work chaps

  • On another level! Once you hear one episode you will have to hear them all!
    May 22, 2015 by Chuck Osswald from United States

    Super Strength Show starts with top performers/coaches/trainers from around the world and chunks down all the important pieces, directed towards any audience. Ray Toulany is unparalled in his ability to make information easy to understand as well as tease out the unspoken gems. You will be glued to your speakers for the entire episode and find yourself eagerly waiting for more. The care put into each episode is clear with a show notes page that helps the curious learn in any medium. Keep up the great work and thanks Ray!

  • A fountain of Strength and training knowledge
    May 14, 2015 by HCF82 from United Kingdom

    After searching for an age to find a good strength podcast I discovered the super strength show through Chris Duffins interview and have been hooked since. The format is excellent with some of the best voices in the world of strength and conditioning appearing. No nonsense straight talking, this really should be one of your first resources to go to if you are a coach or an average joe looking to improve in the weight room.

  • fantastic
    May 10, 2015 by gena_wallis from Australia

    i enjoyed your session.looking forward to more staff.Victor from the Youngpreneurs Podcast!

  • Well structured, interesting, and informative.
    May 2, 2015 by TEEJ888888 from Canada

    I just listened to the first two episodes of the podcast. It's really good. The questions are solid, there is lots of good advice for lifting and for life, and Ray does a good job at interacting with the guest but keeping things on track and flowing. Ray is articulate and the guests seem professional and smart. Overall, I'm very impressed.

  • My top 5 favorite show!
    April 16, 2015 by mrcdmag from United States

    Great show with lots of valuable information! I always have my notebook open and writing.

  • Top strength show
    April 16, 2015 by Alastair7890 from United Kingdom

    Very informative. Top guests

  • Great Show!
    April 10, 2015 by SloneStrength from United States

    Well prepared show. Amazing professionalism! Keep up the great work.

  • AWESOMENESS CONTAINTED
    March 4, 2015 by jamie729 from United Kingdom

    This is an awesome podcast the format, the guests & the topics disscussed are all truely infomative. No BS contained the show always opens up new schools of thoughts and ideas to the listeners. keep up the good work.

  • Subscribe, instantly addictive
    March 2, 2015 by thebroadkaz from Canada

    This show is amazing to listen to it motivates you not only for the gym but for setting and achieving goals in your every day life. Very motivating and positive. Truly helps to get you in the right frame of mind for life and for the gym.

  • An absolutely ace show everytime
    February 24, 2015 by Tommy Eggleton from United Kingdom

    This show is phenomenal! The format and repeated questions for each episode keep the show driving forward, the guests have had ample time to prepare excellent and considered opinions and yet the show never feels like anything but no-BS conversations on building seuperhuman strength and mighty bodies. The host, Ray Toulany, consistently does a marvellous job of drawing out even more from his guests than the material they've prepared and some of the stories that are teased out are superb. I wholeheartedly recommend this to anybody that trains, thinks about training, or simply admires strength sports and bodybuilding in general.

  • Great Resource
    February 4, 2015 by Velvet Jones81 from United States

    For someone new to the strength sports like myself this show has been a great resource. Thanks for doing this show. It has helped a lot.

  • Paul McIlroy
    February 2, 2015 by Paul McIlroy from United Kingdom

    I've been an avid aficionado of all things strength and physical culture related for the vast majority of my entire life. As a former world champion powerlifter and trainer of world champions in different strength sports I can honestly say that Ray Toulany's Super Strength Show is an absolutely INVALUABLE resource for those wishing/needing to maximise their holistic understanding of strength, what it is to be strong, why that is important and how to best achieve it! The list of guests reads like a star studded "who's who" of strength and conditioning ROYALTY! Plus, more than anything the interviews are a ton of fun and provide a fascinating insight into the very best in the business and what makes them tick. It was my complete pleasure and privilege to be a guest on this amazing show (episode 37). If YOU claim to be serious about strength training and are not currently subscribed to THIS show, my honest advice is do so immediately...if not sooner!

  • Super Strength Show
    January 26, 2015 by Joeino from United States

    I love this podcast as I seem to pick up valuable information from each guest. Listing to this is a fun and productive use of my time

  • Excellent Information
    January 26, 2015 by TaylorrrrNB from United States

    These guys obviously do their homework, work hard to create an excellent show and know who to interview in the world of strength and fitness! I’m very impressed by what they have created and the quality of what they do. You need to subscribe! TODAY!!

  • by Brandon Richey
    January 22, 2015 by Great Work SSS from United States

    The Super Strength Show is a fantastic resource for all things concerning strength, fitness, and life. The multitude of guests provides tons of information and perspectives that every listener will appreciate. If you’re serious about strength and the physical culture this is a resource that you just can’t pass up!

  • Very glad I stumbled across this podcast!
    January 22, 2015 by rk102 from United States

    Great info from big-time guests in the strength and conditioning world. Keep up the great work, Ray!

  • Awesome show
    January 13, 2015 by Bonjower from Canada

    The Podcast is the best I’ve encountered in the fitness/bodybuilding sector. The host has a great ability to pull the pertinent information out of his guests. The topics are great and you seem to be able to get useful information out of every interview! Awesome podcast!!

  • Do yourself a favour and subscribe
    January 1, 2015 by GameOverBoss from Canada

    The amount of info and resources in the SuperStrengthShow is just incredible. All of this coming from guests that are the best of the best in their fields. Great questions are asked to these guys and some really insightful answers given (along with a few laughs). I hate wasting time and i'm always looking to evolve and refine my training. This podcast has saved me hours of digging through the crazy crap on the internet to find valid info. It has also introduced me to things i would have never thought to look up. Really can’t recommend enough.

  • Master SFG
    December 24, 2014 by X-Fab69 from Italy

    Awesome Podcast! A whole lot of great and useful information provided by very accomplished athletes and coaches with an extended experience on the ground!

  • Charles C
    December 22, 2014 by CharlieConnely from Canada

    Very impressed with the quality guests that the Super Strength Show is interviewing. Loaded with with actionable and inspiring information. Great production quality and daily episodes!

  • Well done Ray
    December 19, 2014 by Matt McWilliams from United States

    Wow…Super Strenght Show Podcast is flat out awesome. Good production quality. Easy to listen. Very impressed Ray. Keep bringing it.

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185 Eric Bach: Better Physique & Performance with The Power Primer 2.0

In this episode of the Super Strength Show, strength and conditioning coach, Eric Bach, comes on to discuss his new program “The Power Primer 2.0”. The basis for the product is Power Development and how focusing on explosive movements and rep speed can improve strength, build muscle, and help with fat loss. 

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[INTRODUCTION]

 

[0:00:18.9] RT: What’s up Strength Maniacs? And thanks for tuning in. I’m pleased to welcome back today’s guest, Eric Bach. If you haven’t had the opportunity to listen to our first interview with Eric, you can check out Episode 70 where he outlines proven strategies for building a stronger, more athletic and shredded body.

 

For those who need an introduction, here is a quick recap of today’s featured guest. Eric is a certified strength and conditioning coach and precision nutrition certified coach. He has a bachelor’s of science degree emphasizing in sports performance training. Eric is also a fitness author and owner of Bach Performance.

 

His writings on performance and body composition training have been featured in numerous publications from CNN, Huffington Post, T Nation, The PDDC and Bodybuilding.com to the American Council On Exercise. Today we want to bring Eric back on the show to discuss his new product at the power primer. The basis for the product is power development and how focusing on explosive movements and reps speed can improve strength, build muscle and help with fat loss.

 

There are tons of actionable strategies and direct programming in his new program. Not only that but be sure to listen until the end as Eric is going to be hooking us up, you, that’s right, the listeners with a huge discount offer. To connect with Eric, you can visit his website at BachPerformance.com.

 

[INTERVIEW]

 

Eric, welcome back to the show, it’s a pleasure to get you back on here man and I’m ready to dig in to this dude.

[0:01:47.5] EB: Hey man, I’m happy to be here, it’s great to be back.

 

[0:01:49.9] RT: Excellent man, it’s always good to have a guest come back on the show, it’s a lot of fun, we’ve obviously got to build some rapport and what not from last time and this one here is great because we get to do a bit of a free flowing cut in the session. Here we go man, let’s dig in but before we do, for those who haven’t heard the first interview with you, if you wouldn’t mind, tell just a little bit about yourself, give us a couple of minutes man so people can kind of know who you are and who they’re listening to, why they should listen to you?

 

[0:02:15.4] EB: Yeah, background on me, I got my start in the industry in a fairly young in college working as a collegiate strength conditioning coach while I was still finishing my degree. Through that process I’m getting a lot of  hands on experience and one of the benefits of going to a little bit smaller university.

 

With that, I was able to jump right in to the professional field working at an awesome facility out here in Denver Colorado which was partially owned by Steve Hess, strength coach at Denver Nuggets. That allowed me to really kind of hone in and get a little taste of performance while also working with quite a bit of a general population.

 

That’s where I first started to form my niche where I really enjoy helping guys that are ex-athletes and helping them improve their athleticism while also building the best looking bodies. From there on, I worked on Steadman Hawkins Performance with Loren Landow for a few years, I’m under his tutelage, great coach. From there on, I’ve started Bach Performance and now run Bach Performance independently.

 

[0:03:12.3] RT: There you go, good pedigree man, good background, some great information. It’s amazing man, how many guest we have on the show and how many of you guys are out there man, guest experts that just have this tremendous background. I appreciate you taking the time to come on here, I know obviously we’re going to discuss a product that you have and some people may think this is going to be a pitch fest but no, not at all.

 

We’re going to actually dig in here and we’re going to dig up some good kernels that people could apply in their day to day training without even buying the product, just to give them a taste but that being said, highly recommend you get your hands on the complete system because that’s when you’re going to get the real value because you’re going to have the whole entire thing to work with there which is important to make sure you’re doing things correctly and you’re doing all of the things you need to do to get the best results.

 

With that being said Eric. Tell me man, Power Primer, what is the product, what are we talking about here? It’s like a course of some sort, what are we talking?

 

[0:04:08.2] EB: The Power Primer is a three tiered system, a workup program if you will. Now, within the program, what we’re really focusing on is incorporating some of the same athletic principles that are used for power development and the flood system and applying those to guys that aren’t necessarily competitive athletes anymore but are looking to improve their performance and improve their body composition at the same time.

 

With that, we’re talking about rep speed, moving faster, jumps, throws and some of these other components that tend to fall out of our favor or out of our programs as we get away from competitive sports and more into a sedentary lifestyle, desk job, just hitting the weights a couple of times a week when we’re able but not having quite as high a priority on sport performance and movement.

 

[0:04:49.8] RT: All right, sounds good. Okay, so let’s dig in to this a little bit further now that we got kind of the overview. Tell me, what is the general core concept behind this and how is it applied in the program?

 

[0:05:01.9] EB: The big core concept behind this is using maximum explosive intent. What that means, when you’re lifting weight, you are focused, you’re honed in on as much force as you can. We’ve all seen a guy who is doing a squat and kind of going through the motions, say he’s even 135, a fairly light weight versus a guy who regards to the weight on the bar is attacking every rep.

 

He’s mentally focused when it comes on as much force as he can on each rep, regardless of weight on the bar. Now, this gives us a couple of awesome benefits. First and foremost, we can do more with less, so we don’t need quite as much weight so we have a little bit less joint stress/compressive stress depending on the exercise sheer stress to help the body feel a little bit better and allow how your training frequency.

 

Now, we can also increase motor unit recruitments looking at the size principle. If you look at the size principle, the idea there is, we can increase muscle unit recruitment or motor unit recruitment in two different ways. First one, lift heavy weights, simple. I don’t think with most of the listeners here that there’s a problem with lifting more and more weight, am I right?

 

[0:06:06.9] RT: No I don’t think so.

 

[0:06:08.4] EB: No. But the other way, which can be a little better bang for your buck and provide a little bit of a  de-load for the body, lifting lighter weights faster or with maximum explosive intent. That can be talking about using some strength speed, speed strength type percentages anywhere from 30 to 70% give or take to have a high level of muscle fibre recruitment, yet a little bit less stress on the body.

 

[0:06:30.3] RT: Okay, so let me get this straight, my understanding is I think a good way of saying it, an example would be imagine having like a train, you had like a pan, almost like a cookie sheet. Okay? You’re holding on to this thing and then you’re kind of swinging it around in the air, you’re feeling the wind resistance and the harder you swing it around, the more resistance you feel, although it’s very light, there isn’t much to it, the quicker you move it, the more force you need to put into it to move it around.

 

Now, obviously when you’re lifting weights, you don’t have the wind resistance but it’s kind of a concept like that. Although it’s a lighter load, if you lift it with much more intention, just lot more explosiveness and try to move it faster, you’re saying that it’s going to exert more force in the muscles, is that how it is? How does that exactly work?

 

[0:07:20.8] EB: Yeah, what happens is muscle fibres are recruited based upon demand. Let’s look at another example. Say you’re walking down the street and a car comes barreling towards you, what’s your first reaction?

 

[0:07:35.9] RT: Hulk smash — probably get the heck out of the way.

 

[0:07:38.8] EB: Get the heck out of the way, right? We have that impulse where we send the signal to our body that, “Hey, we need to move, we need to generate as much force of these muscles as we possibly can to get up and get out of the way.” With lifting weights, we can apply that same theory is we can kind of half way go through the motions on the rep and the nervous system is only going to call the reps that are needed to go and produce the movement at the rate in which we’re trying to move.

 

That’s where the example of the half speed squat comes in where guys now really push in that tempo. By using that same neuro impulse, we can focus on trying to go up as hard as possible. Think of it like a dynamic effort type work. Using that same forceful intent, that’s where we’re going to increase muscle fibre recruitment.

 

[0:08:29.1] RT: Okay. Okay, got you. You were saying a moment ago that the benefit of that is you are not applying as much wear and tear to the body because you’re using a lighter weight? Does that make sense?

 

[0:08:39.9] EB: Yeah, generally speaking. We could talk about different factors like shotgun the joints and what not later on, however first and foremost, most guys tend to absolutely love lifting heavy and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with it. However overdone, which there’s a tendency for most of us to do, we can have quite a bit of neural stress, joint stress, ligament stress that over time can really beat up the body.

 

Now if we can do more with less or have the same reward with a little less risk in terms of long term training consistency and allow little higher training frequency, I think that’s a good bet and that’s one benefit of using lighter loads, more of a dynamic effort, Power Primer style.

 

[0:09:18.8] RT: Right. Okay. Now, are you going to get the same effect though using a light weight even though you’re moving it very quickly compared to a heavier weight?

 

[0:09:27.8] EB: That really depends what your goal is. This is where it gets into each unique program. Obviously if you want to get maximally strong, you have to lift heavy weights. I’m not saying that that’s the way to completely abandon that aspect. However, if we’re looking at increase in athleticism and kind of bridge the gap between a pure speed and a pure strength movement, lifting lighter, heavier weights is going to let some guys improve that athleticism and have a little more real word carrier to what they’re doing things outside the weight room.

 

[0:09:55.0] RT: Okay. Okay, and that’s because you’re saying, in the real world, like you’re saying about the car, it’s more explosive type of movements when you’re on the field like athletically speaking?

 

[0:10:04.9] EB: Yes, athletically speaking we’re working against a lighter resistance. So if we look at a force velocity curve with a sport, generally you’re just moving your bodyweight through space or against a smaller resistance. So by bridging that gap and not necessarily going for a pure speed movement and just using bodyweight, we can bridge a gap by using some lighter weighted movements that are going to help focus on the velocity component and still generate a lot of force that way.

 

[0:10:29.3] RT: Okay, here’s a question I got for you. There’s something called a Tendo unit. I believe a tendo unit is a device, I think that’s like a branded name but anyway, it’s a device you put in a barbell and it essentially will tell you how quickly you lift the bar or how much force you’re putting into the bar I believe.

 

I know there’s a whole type of training, a method of training that tracks, again, the speed of the bar and obviously you have to factor in the load on the bar as well but if your speed starts to dip to a certain point, you’re basically — you’re done for the day basically is the idea. If you go into the gym and your speed is not where it’s supposed to be and you’re supposed to be lifting at a certain speed then again, you’re either training’s not right or you’re not recovered, something’s not correct with load and right.

 

Anyway, the point I’m trying to make is, you have a device that’s giving you hard data, it’s telling you, you are moving at a certain speed or putting a certain amount of force into the bar. With somebody who is training like this at home and using this concept of speed while lifting the load. How do they gauge whether or not they’re lifting fast enough, how does that work? Or is that even a factor?

 

[0:11:35.7] EB: Yeah, it’s definitely a factor and one big component of this is going to be auto regulation honestly. How do you feel on the rep, technique changing, are you compensating some threat to kinetic chain, are you racking at a different point, if you’re doing a clean? These are all things you’re going to have to look at individually.

 

However one thing, a little trick I like to use is for example on a squat, instead of having the weights completely fast and down with the cliff, move that clip out maybe an inch or two. Once you feel that weight’s stopped rattling, you know what I’m talking about? When you come up fast enough, the way it jumps a little bit. That’s a good queue that your speed is slowing down.

 

You could also take a video even, look at yourself and break down your technique post workout and see at what point are you starting to fatigue? The big point right there though as you’re kind of mentioning this with a Tendo unit. You get to a certain point and that rep speed slows down, your power output’s going to decrease.

 

That becomes a matter of neuro fatigue versus neuro recovery. That’s going to be highly individualized, however the biggest component there is going to be the rest that you’re taking between and any changes you’re going to have in technique.

 

[0:12:42.4] RT: Okay, interesting. Now, break down for us, what are the workouts like and essentially what type of results should somebody expect? What sort of mindset that they bring to the workouts and what type of results should they expect?

 

[0:12:57.7] EB: What’s in the power primer, there’s three different workouts. One is focusing on building athletic strength, that’s going to focus both on getting stronger and then incorporating some athletic values. Athletic values are going to be throughout the entire workout plan. That’s going to be using some more explosive movements to increase athleticism.

 

Now with that program, we are going to get into some fairly heavy weights up to 95% give or take one RM with a sound progressive plan for a 12 week plan. Now, for a lot of people you’re going to see significant increase in weight, maybe 10, 15, 20 pounds in terms of numbers that are going up. When I ran my test group on this, we had a couple of guys that were up as high as 40 pounds up on their max. That was absolutely fantastic to see.

 

Now, when we look at the muscle building program, that’s going to be highly individualized based on how much you adhere to nutrition, you and I both know that we can lift with all the volume and all the intensity boosting methods that we want, but if you’re not getting calories, it’s just not going to happen. That said, in a 12 week plan, most of these lifters are going to be intermediate to advanced, we’ll see anywhere from six to 10 pounds of muscle in nutrition is on par.

 

Now, what we do in terms of muscle building that’s a little bit different is we still use some explosive movement but we think about that as more or less potentiating a greater number of muscle fibres to fatigue. You can only more or less stimulate a growth response for muscle fibre are getting stimulated within a training session. That’s where some of the strength working come in. The muscle fibres and then we add in some density boosting measures later on that are going to help provide some of that metabolic stress, mechanical tension and muscular damage for growth.

 

Going forward, we’ll also have the fat loss program. The fat loss program is a little bit different than all three because they’re going to be obviously operating in a caloric deficit which isn’t always the most fun. What we’ll do there is we’ll have a combination of heavy loading and lighter, more explosive loading to really help hold on to muscle mass where in a caloric deficit.

 

At the same time we’ll also use some high density training and a greater level of conditioning where we’re getting into some more athletic type drills, sprint work, to help take off body fat. Overall, all the workouts should be able to be completed 50 to 65 minutes give or take, they’re not extremely long but they are focused and predicated on quality over quantity which is always a good thing.

 

[0:15:11.0] RT: Yeah, it’s interesting because we just had a guest on, Craig Weller. We were talking about deliberate practice and making sure that it’s quality because he was talking about the study, the 10,000 hour rule and how it’s not just a set in stone, just 10,000 hours all of a sudden you’re Mozart. Some people did 10,000 hours and they became world class, other people did 10,000 hours or 8,000, whatever the number was in the specific study but again it relates to that whole 10,000 hour rule idea.

 

Some became like Mozart and some really didn’t get that much better and it all depended on the quality of the training. I hear what you’re saying, the workouts are a little shorter but at the end of the day it’s about quality. Okay, tell us, now, with the concept of being very explosive, what about risk for injury, does injury risk go up? How does that work?

 

[0:15:57.8] EB: That was an important point when I was putting this piece together. So what I have included is a full exercise substitution guide throughout the program. If you don’t know how to do a clean, by all means, I would love for you to learn, it’s a great lift with a lot of unique benefits, but you’re not forced into any particular exercise. The big focus for the entire program is using explosive intent.

 

What I urge everybody to do is pick exercises that match a particular movement pattern but then focus on using explosive intent. That means instead of necessarily doing a clean with 60 or 70% as it’s listed in your program, if you don’t know how to clean, fine. Do a front squat, do a back squat with those same percentages but just have that explosive intent all the way throughout.

 

Or, if you can do a barbell bench press because your shoulder is not happy, feel free to switch and use a buffalo bar, use a floor press or use some dumbbells with some explosive intent. That’s the big bridging factor. Lift everything explosively when it’s needed, those first main lifts.

 

[0:16:53.8] RT: Okay, all right, that’s good. Basically what you’re saying is, you provide substitutes so people can work around an impossible preexisting injuries maybe or if they’re not familiar with certain movements so they can avoid getting injured to begin with.

 

[0:17:06.8] EB: Exactly. Never want to shove a square peg into a round hole, it’s just not going to work. In terms of improving your movements and staying injury free, we all know exercises that are better for us than others, we all have problem exercises that are unique to our body, whether it’s a different type of deadlift, whether a trap bar works better than a conventional pull versus a sumo deadlift. Use what works best for you, granted within that movement pattern.

 

[0:17:33.1] RT: Okay, yeah. Yeah because there’s a handful of movement patterns and then obviously within each movement pattern, there’s a huge variety of exercises. Certainly there’s got to be something somewhere that will suit your abilities, your mobility, potential existing injuries, old injuries and you’ll be okay.

 

Okay, so what you’re saying is, in all likelihood, you can apply all aspects of this program as long as you’re relatively healthy, correct?

 

[0:17:59.3] EB: Exactly, exactly.

 

[0:18:01.5] RT: Okay, we’re going to go to a break here in a moment but before we do, I should have probably asked this earlier on but what are we getting in this package?

 

[0:18:09.4] EB: Yeah, so this package, this week actually is going to be $29.99. That’s 50% off with the price going forward. Now, within each program, you’re going to get three 12 week programs, that’s 36 weeks or about eight months’ worth of programming, full progression, the entire weight through and exercise substitution guide within also an entire video guide to cover every exercise that’s in the Power Primer and a one rep max guidelines. That will give you the opportunity to test, assess and find correct numbers for your Power Primer workouts.

 

[0:18:41.6] RT: Okay, I’m assuming this is digital version is what you’re getting? It’s not a physical product, it’s digital, right?

 

[0:18:46.9] EB: Yeah, sorry about that. Yeah, the entire thing, it’s a digital product that will be available for download so you’ll be able to take it with you when you go into the gym, whether you want to download it on your laptop, on your smart phone or tablet, whatever you want, it’s going to be easily downloadable and digital.

 

[0:19:01.8] RT: Okay, we’re talking just text, PDF’s, are we talking video?

 

[0:19:06.9] EB: We’ve got a combination. It’s going to be PDF based, however there’s also an entire video guide for every exercise that is in the Power Primer. You have a full video guide with exercise and instruction. Queue’s, video demonstrations to help you optimize your form, minimize risk of injury and optimize performance.

 

[0:19:27.0] RT: Okay, all right, it sounds like it covers pretty much everything. All right, let’s go to a break, we’ll come back, we’ll cover a couple more questions and we’ll dig in to a couple of good nuggets that people can take away in the plan of their training, sounds good?

 

[0:19:36.6] EB: Sounds good man.

 

[0:19:37.0] RT: All right, let’s do that. So guys, this is the Super Strength Show, you’re listening t Eric Bach and he’s on here talking about his new power primer, sounds pretty good to me and when we come back, we’re going to dive into more details. Hold on to your dumbbells guys, be right back.

 

[BREAK MESSAGE]

 

[0:19:52.2] RT: The world of working out is seriously confusing at first. It punishes uneducated lifters with years of poor gains and injures, and reward smart ones with slabs of lean muscle and superhuman strength. If you don’t know if you’re using the right form, have hit a plateau, or things just seem a whole lot more confusing than you thought they’d be, I want to help you out.

 

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Whether you’re a novice lifter or have years of experience in the Iron game, this is a very helpful resource that you can either apply to your own training or use as a helpful guide to teach others. Stop wasting time and effort in the gym and get the info you need to maximize your gains and minimize your risk for injury. Visit www.Instantstrength.com and get your free report today.

 

[INTERVIEW CONTINUED]

 

[0:20:57.1] RT: All right guys, we’re back with our guest, Eric Bach from BachPerformance.com and ThePowerPrimer.com. Eric, prior to going to break, we were starting to get into some specifics and details. During the break we were kind of talking and I was thinking to myself, “This sounds like it’s designed for young athlete of some sort.” So I’ve got a couple of questions here. Is this really limited to people who are either athletes or who have athletic type of a background?

 

[0:21:23.3] EB: This program is best for people who have some experience in the gym but it doesn’t necessarily have to be for competitive athlete. The big take away with the Power Primer is lifting faster, moving like an athlete, we’re going to incorporate jumps and those and some of those principles and components of athletic training programs but it’s not fully built for athletes. You can reap some of the same benefits build that show and go style body where you’re strong, athletic and capable but it’s not fully versed towards athletes.

 

[0:21:51.3] RT: Okay, all right. Now, what about the age thing? I have my own opinion on that kind of stuff but anyway I know some people will be asking that. Is this meant for somebody who is younger as supposed to somebody who is 40 plus?

 

[0:22:03.1] EB: Nope, I’ve had a number of clients that are 40 plus go through his program and it works awesome. A big reason for that is as we get older, we tend to shy away from some of these explosive movements and that’s for good reason because a lot of times if we do them incorrectly, we can have some compounding joint issues that add up over time.

 

For guys over 40, I have quite a few clients actually who are in this age range. 35, 40, 45 who are ex-athletes, work a typical desk job and one of the big missing components of their program is athletic and explosive movement. So by reincorporating some of the same values whether they’re jumps, throws, lifting with more of a kind of a dynamic effort perspective, we can activate some of those high threshold muscle fibres that are more or less kind of getting shut down with age.

 

This is going to help improve athleticism. A lot of times I’ll find that they’re feeling better, better balanced strength coordination and all components that are going to be vital to longevity and athleticism as you get older.

 

[0:22:57.3] RT: Yeah, it’s a good point, I remember reading something years ago. Clarence Bass I think is who it was. A few years back and he was talking about how he noticed his explosiveness, the spring in his step is something that he really noticed was kind of fading away as he aged. He was getting up there, he was like 60, 70’s and he was really noticing this.

 

So he started to introduce some Olympic style type of movement, some more explosive type movements and that really made a big difference for hm. Obviously he get to do this intelligently, don’t be foolish about it but yeah, that does seem to be something that does fade if you do not keep it going and stay on top of it and train the athletic component of your body.

 

This is something you’re saying in fact, it’s the opposite, it’s not that it’s not good for somebody over 40, in fact, it’s good for somebody over 40 because this is the type of physicality or athleticism that you start to lose potentially. You kind of notice it more as you age correct?

 

[0:23:54.0] EB: Yeah, 100%, and you bring up a really good point talking about all that stuff. We look at quality of life through the aging process as we get older and you know, we talk about this athletic training methods, they sounds awesome and sexy and, “Ah, yeah, let’s get somebody jacked but nothing is more practical than helping somebody preserve their physical capacity as long as humanly possible.

 

Just by applying the same intent, whether you’re using a dumbbell, whether you’re walking up a stair. Have a little more intent on what you’re doing, have a little more pop. You don’t have to be doing power cleans, step jumps and all these high intensity crazy measures but having that focus and applying a little bit more pop and focus on each exercise into that can be really beneficial throughout the aging process.

 

You touched on the idea that you have to do something, you have to do everything with intent and safely, you’re going to treat 55 year old than a 70 year old differently than a 25 year old. The same principles can apply across a lifespan as long as you use them intelligently.

 

[0:24:51.8] RT: Okay, cool. Okay, this is something I got to ask you. When I was first introduced to the concept of compensatory accelerated training, you’re using bins, you’re using chains and the benefit of that is you can extend all the way to full extension and the added weight which slow you down enough that you’re not going to hyper extend a joint.

 

When we talk about explosive type of movements, is that something that you got to be cautious of, how does that kind of factor into things?

 

[0:25:18.0] EB: Yeah, that can be an important point. Using bands as some of these other methods can decrease will be called ballistic shock and trauma on the joints. However at the same time, I’m just speaking from practical firsthand experience. I haven’t really noticed much of an issue with those component. Have you really — like I said, I’ve read about it numerous times, I’ve used plenty of bands in my training and with clients for that compulsive story acceleration but have you seen any issues with clients that you’re working with , or personally?

 

[0:25:44.9] RT: No, I’ve never have personally known. I have again, I’m trying to think like times when I’ve done speed reps without bands or chains and no, I’ve never really noticed any issues at all actually. There’s enough weight there that it’s not like I’m not using any weight and it’s really easy to — it’s like trying to punch somebody and that feeling you get, not that you run around punching people, then again there are people out there probably — That’s not right people. I’m just kidding, don’t go around punching people.

 

That kind of idea, you go to hit something and you miss or you’re coming down the stairs and you miss the step and you kind of hyper extend your leg a little bit if that makes sense or like hit a pot hole when you’re walking. It’s like that concern, you’re going to jar your joint. Yeah, now that I think about it, I’ve never really ever had that issue. I’m sure if I had just the bar, maybe a plate, maybe okay, at that point in time it’s so light that I may do that but no, once you get any reasonable amount of weight. No.

 

It’s so light that you move it super quick but yeah, you’re not going to hurt yourself. I want to add to that. Do you use bands or chains in this program?

 

[0:26:52.2] EB: I do not in the program, mostly because that adds a very big level of complexity and a lot of people are not able to use when it comes to a program. There’s something I definitely use in the past and if you have experience with it, by all means, feel free to play around a little bit as long as you’re loading parameters, the weight plus the resistance of a band or a chain, whatever you plan to use. Stays within the percentages, recommended in the power primer but really for ease of access and programming for a lot of people, that’s not something that’s included.

 

[0:27:20.9] RT: Okay, cool. All right. You don’t need to get extra equipment is what you’re saying?

 

[0:27:24.9] EB: Exactly. This should be able to be done with a bare bones gym, whether it’s a dumbbells, barbells, all that stuff and like you said. Bands can be great and focusing on acceleration through different ranges of motion is awesome but doesn’t have to be part of the program.

 

[0:27:41.3] RT: Okay. Okay now Eric, how about you give us like a specific one, two, specific examples of how you can apply these concepts. Like something that we could use right now in our training like while we’re listening to this or like the next day, so we could just get a taste of what this program is about. Are you able to do that?

[0:28:02.2] EB: Yeah I can do that. You guys are pretty cool, I can do that.

 

[0:28:04.9] RT: Yeah, yeah, yeah. I’m not sure like you’ve got to have like the whole thing laid out in front of you or no, these are actually one technique, one tip that somebody can walk away with and just try it and then they’ll actually get a feel for it. You’re saying yes, that is possible. Let’s go for it man. What’s that like?

 

[0:28:20.7] EB: Yeah, after you warm up, you should all be doing a warm up right? We definitely at that part, you can’t just be skipping that over, I know we’re all guilty but go through your warm-up. Before you get to your main lift of the day, we can say it’s a bench press for example. We’re going to focus on doing an exercise by mechanically similar but focus on being as explosive as possible.

 

This is going to do a couple of things. First because the exercise bio-mechanically similar so we can do a plyometric pushup, a clap push up. Any sort of exercise that is a horizontal push that is similar to a bench press. We’re going to fire up the central nervous system and get that ready for a performance. Essentially what’s going to happen is you’re going to improve more in your recruitment and patterning for that big lift. Does that make sense?

 

[0:29:04.8] RT: Yeah, definitely. It’s like you’re firing things up.

 

[0:29:07.7] EB: Exactly. So I’ll take it a step further, and go a little geeky on it but really we would consider this is intramuscular coordination. That’s the synchronized firing of motor units. Now, there are three different aspects that improve that intramuscular coordination that are all going to happen when you use an explosive exercise, before the main exercise for potentiation. We’ll be called rate coating.

 

Think of that like firing up a motor unit a little bit faster. It’s almost like going from a single shot pistol to a semi-automatic gun. The more powerful, the more rapidly you’re going to be able to generate that force. You’re also going to be able to create a greater unit of muscle fibres or greater number of muscle units and muscle fibres.

 

That’s going to help you instead of say using 70% of muscle fibres, 75. You get that little boost in performance. Third, you’re also going to have synchronization. For synchronization, think about rowing a boat. If you had four people rowing together versus each person rowing at their own pace, what’s going to be more effective? Obviously the four people that are rowing together, right?

 

[0:30:08.4] RT: Obviously yeah.

 

[0:30:10.9] EB: The synchronization is going to help synchronize…

 

[0:30:14.7] RT: Otherwise they wouldn’t have that lazy bastard up at the front just hollering at them, the fifth guy, telling them to all row together at the same time.

 

[0:30:20.3] EB: That guy’s a prick I’ll tell you what man.

 

[0:30:22.1] RT: All right.

 

[0:30:24.3] EB: Yeah so all three of these together though are going to improve that intramuscular coordination so you’re going to have more muscle fibres that are going together, more muscle fibres firing, they’re going to fire together and they’re going to fire faster.

 

All three of those components, granted you manage fatigue and take 60 to 90 seconds rest in between each sets that you’re going three sets of five and then maybe another two minutes after that explosive exercise, that’s going to help potentiate your body, warm me up for a little bit more better bench press.

 

[0:30:53.3] RT: Okay, so how do we apply this? We’re going to the workout, how are we going to actually apply this thing? We’re in the gym, what are we doing?

 

[0:30:59.0] EB: All right, step one, warm up. Do whatever your normal warm up, just go through that, excellent. Let’s say you’re going to do an incline bench pushups, your hands are on the bench, you lower yourself down and do an explosive pushup projecting yourself up beside you can before you catch yourself and repeat again.

 

You’ll go three sets of five, take 60 to 90 seconds down in between each set and then take two minutes down after your last set. After the first set. Then you would be able to jump right into your bench press, whatever percentages and training numbers you’re working at. With that, you’re going to have all that improved intramuscular coordination to help you use more muscle fibres, have them fire the same time in synchronized movement.

 

[0:31:39.7] RT: Okay, so this doesn’t sound overly complicated?

 

[0:31:41.9] EB: No, not at all, that’s the beauty of it. In the book, I lay it out as simply as we can with the science laid out. The science is complicated, however being able to sift through it and hone the big idea, that’s the cool thing about the Power Primer. Match the explosive — or focus on explosive demand and match the same mechanical movement for the big lift that you’re doing for the day.

 

So if it’s going to be a squat, you can do a squat jump. If it’s going to be a deadlift you can do a light kettlebell swing or a broad jump, it’s going to be an overhead press, could be an overhead throw with a medicine ball, over head slam with a medicine ball or sand-bell.

 

[0:32:18.0] RT: Okay. Pretty easy, what was that last one you said?

 

[0:32:21.4] EB: Sand-bell. Yeah.

 

[0:32:25.0] RT: Tell us about those.

 

[0:32:25.8] EB: Yeah. If you get a medicine ball that’s going to have some bounce and you do an overhead slam — I’ll cover the overhead slam in a second. Imagine holding a medicine ball over your head, arms are locked out, looking straight ahead, keep your abs braced and prevent flection forward, so you’re not bending over forward.

 

As your abs are engaged, you throw the ball down as hard as you can without flexing forward. That’s really going to fire up the lats and into your core and provide a little more activation and stabilization through the kinetic chain. Now, if you have a ball that’s bouncy, where’s that ball going to go? Probably your teeth or your nuts.

 

[0:32:58.0] RT: Your teeth, yeah.

 

[0:32:59.0] EB: Yeah, so either one of those. What a sand-bell is, sand-bell is I think they come anywhere from about eight pounds to I think all the way up to 40 but 10 to 12 pounds is good for this exercise. This is a very durable bag that’s filled with sand, it’s got a neoprene cover, just very resistant to damage. When you throw a sand on the ground, its’ not going to bounce up and hit your buddies or your teeth. Just a different piece of equipment to protect yourself.

 

[0:33:25.1] RT: Okay, all right. I’ve seen those around but I sometimes forget about them but yeah, definitely got to have the right equipment. I remember seeing a guy one time taking a sledge hammer to a tire and he didn’t realize that you got to be careful because it’s going to bounce back, there’s a big tire, big bouncy tire, just the way the specific tire was setup.

 

I think it was off of like a — man, what do they call those things? All of a sudden I forget. Those little tiny units that I use. It’s got a little bucket on the front of it, they use them to clear. Bobcat, it was like a bobcat tire. It’s like a little tiny earth moving thing. They use them a lot of times to clear the snow off sidewalks in cities.

 

Anyway man, this tire, it’s a good sized tire but the way it was setup was vertical. He was coming down on the tire the way it would be like on the actual vehicle if that makes sense, it’s actually sitting on its tread. Because it was setup like that, had a lot of bounce to it. Man he came down on that thing, he is so lucky that he only got the handle on the forehead. He didn’t get the head of the actual sledge hammer, the head of it, back into his teeth or into his nose.

 

Anyway, I was watching him and I was going. I was just — I turned around and saw and said, “Woah, woah, you’ve got to hold on, you got to watch how you do” — boom, right into his face. Poor guy man but he was lucky, he didn’t split anything open or anything like that. He had a bit of a bruise going on there but yeah. That’s something to kind of mention here guys. Not only do you got to do the exercises right but make sure you’re using the right equipment. Anyway, that’s it for that. Enough for that PSA, “The more you know”.

[0:34:51.0] EB: You got a beautiful voice.

 

[0:34:52.0] RT: You like that?

 

[0:34:53.4] EB: I do, yeah.

 

[0:34:54.5] RT: Definitely. I got to tell you, I’ve been working on it, I’ve been in the opera, I’ve been working on being a soprano and just got to finalize the last little operation to get rid of the boys and make sure I can really hit them high pitch, high notes. It will be great. Anyway, then I won’t have to worry about using sand bells when I’m doing that.

 

No, getting back to all seriousness. Okay, it doesn’t sound like the concept is really complicated. Now, the last question I got here and we’re probably going to wrap this up. You need to mentally remind yourself to really push right? To explode through the movement. Is that going to become an issue near the end of a set? I don’t know how many reps you got in sets or near the end of the workout where you’re starting to fatigue.

 

[0:35:38.2] EB: When we’re talking about really applying that rep speed, it’s really going to mostly apply for the early exercise that we’re focusing on. Especially if we’re talking about a muscle building workout. For example, if we’re doing a set of 15 in a bicep curl, I’m not going to have you necessarily focus on maximum concentric explosiveness at every single rep.

 

Now, for the early sets, it’s going to be your focus but reps are held pretty low for that reason. As you mentioned, it can be mentally fatiguing to stay locked in for all these aspects but that’s also an area I can see lot of guys really improving, a lot of men and women when they’re doing their training.

 

We all walk in to a general gym these days and we see somebody on their smart phone or tweeting between every single set rather being focused and engaged on what they’re doing. Just adding that explosive intent and that mindset is going to help you lock in the little more keen in terms of your technique, how you’re performing every single rep and that alone can be a big performance advancer.

 

[0:36:30.2] RT: Okay, all right, good. Yeah man, I think this is a training method that not too many people, your average, guys going to the gym and gals going to the gym really use. I think this would be a very interesting way to go about training for a while definitely. Just to kind of be clear here before we close this up. You’re saying, when you purchase the product, you’re getting a 12 week training block, are you saying you’re getting 12 week training blocks?

 

[0:36:55.8] EB: Yeah, you’re getting three full 12 week training blocks. Within each of those training blocks, there’s a one rep max guide to help you calculate your numbers that are used within the Power Primer. Within that, you’re also getting an exercise substitution guide. So if there is exercises that you’re not comfortable with whether it’s an Olympic lift, you’re going to have something that you can switch out and still be able to hit that workout without missing a beat. Or for example, you’re at a hotel gym, you might not be able to hit your percentages but you can flip out exercises and use dumbbells for an exercise as needed.

 

[0:37:27.4] RT: Okay. All right. Just to be clear, the three blocks that you’re getting, are they all like this one focused on fat loss, one is focused on muscle gain? What are the different blocks focused on?

 

[0:37:39.4] EB: Yeah, three different blocks, there’s the Power Primer athletic muscle guide and that’s about 12 weeks long and that’s going to use some power performance principles the beginning but then focus more on bodybuilding methods later on. The fat loss program is going to be focused and predicated on explosive movement and some heavy strength work to help you hold on to lean muscle while you’re in your dietary deficit.

 

You’ll look no better if you lose all your muscle at the same time on a cut. So that’s an important component there. The athletic strength program, that’s going to get you stronger, improve athleticism, speed, power, all that stuff, that’s another 12 week program. So three 12 week programs that have athleticism as an underlying theme but are then customized towards a goal.

 

[0:38:20.7] RT: All right. Sounds good to me. Yeah man, I love it when somebody like yourself takes an effective training method that is based in real science and then is able to essentially simplify it, codify it and put it into a system with the rest of us to follow. Guys, you always hear me say that the only real shortcut, closest thing to a shortcut is doing it right the first time and that requires you ultimately to have a mentor, a guide, somebody who has been there, done that — you hear me say it all the time.

 

Someone who has been there, done that, has taken others like you there and has come back to the Promised Land to take you there too. Ideally if that person was in the position similar to you, it’s really helpful but really important is that they’ve helped others, they have that ability to do that. Now, not everybody has somebody close by to them. In person, its’ the best thing. Then you obviously have the internet which is a wonderful thing especially now with, you got videos chat and you could record videos and send it over and emails.

 

There’s a lot of things you can do to get — it might not be as close as having that person right next to you but it’s pretty darn good. Now, there’s people who say, “Well I really can’t afford that.” Well, then you have what right now Eric is talking about, somebody who knows what he’s talking about, he’s put together a training program for you and I mean for very little money. I mean if you think about it, you do the math on that, it’s like $10, $20 bucks a month. No, what am I talking about? For a 12 week block. You’re paying like three bucks a month for a training routine, training program.

 

[0:39:45.6] EB: Exactly man.

 

[0:39:46.5] RT: Yeah, you’re getting high quality and guys, I want to just put this out there right now, if somebody’s trying to sell you something that isn’t personal coaching for $100 plus. Some preprogrammed thing that doesn’t take your personal type of situation into account, it doesn’t give you feedback, be very careful of that, okay? Because somebody’s trying to rip you off.

 

What Eric’s doing here is, he’s pricing this very favourably, even at full price, this is still very favourably priced and also, as I mentioned, the nice thing is, you know what you’re getting, explain to you like this program is designed to give you this results, it’s not just some random thing you’re finding online, you’re not exactly sure what this is supposed to give you and Eric knows his stuff. He’s researched this which is great.

 

As I always say man, look, at the end of the day, it depends as to whether or not this is resonating with you. If this sounds like something that’s up your ally then I would say reach out and check it out man, it’s very inexpensive to do and having a coach, mentor in person is ideal then you can have somebody remote and then the third option would be getting your hands in a program. A very well designed program that’s based in science, that’s based in improving systems, it’s structured in a manner that you can follow without having, without getting lost.

 

It has not just the routine itself but as Eric has done here, he’s provided you with substitutes for certain exercises. So if there’s a movement that you’re not very comfortable with, don’t do that movement if you don’t have the proper training or coaching. Maybe you can find somebody locally to teach it to you, that would be ideal.  But if not, then stick with the one that you can do because there’s no benefit in getting all jacked up or doing the movement inefficiently, that’s really not good for you either.

 

You’re not going to get the results, let alone just the potential to getting injured. He also has a video as well. Now Eric, if people want to get support after picking this up, is there any way that they could shoot an email over to you? Is there any membership group or forum or something like that they can, like Facebook group or something?

 

[0:41:42.8] EB: The best way is going to be on social media. Facebook — Facebook.com/bachperformance. The page is very active, they’ll be very active going forward especially with the power parameter coming up. For the most direct access, actually Snapchat is probably the way to get a hold of me these days.

 

[0:41:56.7] RT: For real?

 

[0:41:57.0] EB: For real man, it’s a good time. Although you might get quite a few dog pictures but so Snapchat @bachreric is a really good spot. If you go to direct question, I can hit you back on that right away really faster than any other platform.

 

[0:42:11.7] RT: Okay cool. I mean, there’s a support aspect to this as well?

 

[0:42:14.8] EB: Exactly.

 

[0:42:15.8] RT: I mean, come on man, you’ve got to be kidding me. There’s options out there for everybody guys, there’s a variety of ways that you can train, which is awesome. There’s a variety of personalities when it comes to coaches, that’s awesome. There’s a variety of different levels, like I said, coach, in person, remote, virtual and giving your hands on a program like this here, pre written program. There’s options out there for people man, for everybody. There’s no excuses nowadays not to get quality coaching in one form or another. Eric, I appreciate you coming on the show man.

 

[0:42:45.8] EB: Hey, I appreciate having me, it was a blast to talk shop a little bit and tell everybody about the Power Primer. I’m happy to be here and I’m glad everybody can hopefully take something from this show and apply directly to their training right away.

 

[0:42:57.1] RT: Excellent man, definitely and it is ThePowerPrimer.com.

 

[0:43:07.4] EB: I’m in URL battles right now, everybody trying to take all the websites I want.

 

[0:43:10.9] RT: Yeah, exactly. ThePowerPrimer.com and you guys will find everything you need there. Now, SuperStrengthShow.com, you put in the search bar Eric Bach, you will have his other episode will come up as well, recommend you listen to it if you haven’t already. This one will come up as well and you know, you can listen to it there again, you can download it, you can share with others with the social media buttons that we have on there.

 

There is links to the various podcasting platforms we are on, you could listen to the show there or ideally sign up if you haven’t already. That way there the show comes directly to you, which is the best way. You don’t have to remind yourself to go check it out and we got shows coming out all the time man, you don’t want to miss anything, right?

 

Also, there’s an ability to leave a review, we really appreciate it when you leave a review for us, it does a lot of things and one of the things that it does for us is that it raises the show on the rankings like in iTunes for example. That’s good because it gets more eyeballs on the show, more people get to get in on the fun and on the good stuff, and they get the benefit from all these great guest and great information that’s on the show.

 

That’s wonderful but it also benefits you as well because what it does is, it allows guys like Eric to realize, “You know what? This is a show with an engaged audience and it’s worthwhile for me to come on and make this platform that I can benefit from and make it worth my while.” So five star reviews in iTunes go a long way. You can leave reviews on stitcher, that’s also beneficial. We appreciate all of that and for each and every one of you who have already done that, thank you so much, it means a lot, it really does.

 

I know there’s a lot of shows out there that you could tune in to when you decide to tune into these one here, it means a lot to myself and the team and when you go out of your way to write that review, it makes us pretty happy over here. Because ultimately, like Eric and the guests that come on here, we want to help you guys, cut through the BS and get to the good stuff and avoid the morass and the getting lost in the forest and the woods and not knowing which direction to go in, we have a wide variety of guest to come on the show.

 

Certainly there’s going to be somebody that has a training method and ideology and the personality type that will resonate with you and at that point in time, it’s up to you to put the stuff to use. On the show notes page, we’ll have links to various ways to get a hold of Eric.  We’ll have all sorts of videos and just a bunch of stuff on there. Social media, Snapchat, all that stuff to get a hold of and will be on there, a lot of good stuff, highly recommend you check out the show notes page.

 

You could sign up for the weekly tips there, you get information on what shows are coming out, you’ll also get tips on for training and you also get the free report that shows you how to maximize your strength while minimizing your risk for injury. Very important, don’t forget that guys. It’s there for you to take, it’s there for the taking. Sign up for the newsletter and you’ll get a hold of that. I highly recommend you do that. Feedback@superstrengthshow.com. Good, bad or fugly, let us know guys, take it all into consideration.

 

Photos at info@superstrengthshow.com. You can also send links to videos of yourself on YouTube. Before and after’s, home training setups, I don’t know, maybe some cool equipment you guys designed for yourself. I know with some of the Strongmen guys out there, I know we love to create some pretty interesting stuff from the scrap yard. Anything you guys got man, send it over, we’d love sharing it with the audience and the family we got here, everybody loves checking that stuff up, it’s motivational.

 

That’s about that. Eric, one last time, thank you so much.

 

[0:46:18.7] EB: Hey, thank you for having me, thank you everybody for listening and pick up your Power Primer at ThePowerPrimer.com and leave Ray an awesome review.

 

[0:46:24.8] RT: Thank you so much guys. Thank you, I really appreciate that. Take advantage of this guys, Eric’s been really kind, he’s providing that discount so make sure you guys take advantage. And no, I’m not — he didn’t pay me to come on the show to do this, I’m just going to put that out there. If I do choose to be an affiliate for him, I will make it very clear that that’s what this is. So I want to put that out there too.

 

I know some guys, maybe they’re getting an envelope under the table to get people to come on the show. There’s none of that crap going on here. Anyway, Eric’s a great guy, good info, take advantage of it and as we always say, put this stuff to use and until next time, train smart, train hard and we’ll talk to you then.
[END]

 

More Specifically in this Episode You’ll Learn About

  • Eric shares his story of how he started Bach Performance
  • What is The Power Primer?
  • What makes The Power Primer different from other training programs?
  • The benefits of maximum explosive intent
  • The Size Principle
  • The benefits of lifting lighter weights at a faster pace
  • How you can increase muscle fiber recruitment
  • Creating real world carry over with your training
  • Tips and techniques for measuring your rep speed
  • Neurofatigue vs. Neurorecovery
  • What to expect with The Power Primer workouts
  • Choosing the right exercises within a movement pattern
  • Who is the Power Primer program designed for?
  • Intramuscular Coordination
  • Eric lays out an exercise from the program that you can apply and test out today
  • Overhead sandbell slams
  • How to prepare yourself mentally for explosive movements
  • Eric explains the three 12 week Power Primer programs – Athletic Muscle Guide, Fat Loss Program, Athletic Strength Program
  • The Power Primer – 50% off between April 7th– April 9th at 11:59 PM.

About Eric Bach

Eric is a certified Strength and Conditioning Coach and Precision Nutrition Certified Coach. He has Bachelors of Science degree, emphasizing in sports performance training.

Eric is also a fitness author and the owner of Bach Performance. His writings on performance and body composition training have been featured in numerous publications from CNN, Huffington Post, T-Nation, the PTDC, and bodybuilding.com to the American Council on Exercise.

To connect with Eric, you can visit his website at BachPerformance.com.

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Success Quote

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Training Resources Mentioned in this Episode

ThePowerPrimer.com 50% off between April 7th– April 9th at 11:59 PM.

Guest Videos

Hang Power Clean from Blocks

 

Clean from Blocks

 

Clean Progression: Muscle Clean

Connect With Eric Bach

Website
Facebook
Twitter  – @Eric_Bach
LinkedIn
Google +
YouTube

Check Out What Others Are Saying on iTunes! 

  • Awesome Podcast
    April 21, 2017 by Brooke Craven from United States

    Ray, host of Super Strength Show, highlights all aspects of fitness and nutrition in this can't miss podcast. Ray and his expert guests offer insightful and inspirational advice on how to live a healthy lifestyle!

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    Un canal con contenido muy completo e interesante. Gracias ppr toda la info!

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    July 9, 2016 by Charles M R from United States

    That Frank Zane interview!

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    Really glad I found this. Lots of care into each podcast, Ray walks the walk and really understands what is being discussed. I really just have one request- stop the Delorean story.

  • 51 and going strong
    June 22, 2016 by Canvas back from Canada

    I used to lift heavy in my late teens and into my 30s and then other thinks like kids,job, house etc took over and I lost motivation. I'm 52 now and starting to show the signs of aging so I thought I better get back at it. It was real tough. Slower gains, easy injuries, slower recovery. Tough to get back into the grove. While searching for some motivating pod casts I came across the SSS pod casts. I listen daily and I can honestly say that it has changed my life. It's more motivating that a gym full of people. I have learned more in 2 months than I learned in 20 years. The host is great to listen to, is very knowledgeable and keeps me wanting more. The guests are great. I look forward to listening. We have a wellness committee at my work and I think I have the entire group as fans of the SSS. Please don't ever stop!

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    I started training at the age of 41 obese and intimidated. The guests are an inspiration and encouragement toto keep moving forward on this journey.

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    Love listening to this podcast. Amazing information and I always learn something from all the great guests. Thank you!

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    Some really cool guests that I wouldn't otherwise come across and Ray does a great job getting into their expertise. Almost always wish the show was longer.

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    September 12, 2015 by Mvecdi from Canada

    Please don’t ever stop,i really enjoy it. Wish i found it before. I listen to it while working out or driving etc. Just wanted to tell you to keep doing what you are doing. And would love to see more of people like Mike Israetel etc. Such as Brad Schoenfeld. Anyways love the show, thanks for making it.

  • Very professional
    September 7, 2015 by Ayrshire Lad from United Kingdom

    Always learning something new from Ray and his well selected line up of guests. Sometimes feels a little repetitive as Ray asks all the tried and tested questions to ensure the listener always has a takeaway..its laid back but focused and very professional !!

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    Ray does a fantastic job of asking articulate and interesting questions. I always really enjoy his podcasts and learn useful info! Keep up the good work!

  • has become the best Strength podcast
    June 21, 2015 by SuperHuman YYZ from Canada

    I think its overtaken superhuman radio and motivation + muscle as the top podcast for those who love physical culture and the iron game. Ray does a great job interviewing, just the right amount of interjecting his ideas and opinions. The guest list is incredible, the who's who, past and present.

  • The fountain of youth.
    June 10, 2015 by rroxanne from Canada

    Very good . I love the article. I listened to it 3 times to write everything down. Lol. Bad memory. Oh and love Rays voice.

  • just pure MEGA, Pig Iron all the way
    May 25, 2015 by Strongman1981 from United Kingdom

    The Super Strength Show is an amazing and extremely informative resource for anyone involved in physical culture. With an enthusiastic and highly intelligent host and a who’s who’s line up of guests, a must for anyone to sit down, eat grapefruits and enjoy. great work chaps

  • On another level! Once you hear one episode you will have to hear them all!
    May 22, 2015 by Chuck Osswald from United States

    Super Strength Show starts with top performers/coaches/trainers from around the world and chunks down all the important pieces, directed towards any audience. Ray Toulany is unparalled in his ability to make information easy to understand as well as tease out the unspoken gems. You will be glued to your speakers for the entire episode and find yourself eagerly waiting for more. The care put into each episode is clear with a show notes page that helps the curious learn in any medium. Keep up the great work and thanks Ray!

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    May 14, 2015 by HCF82 from United Kingdom

    After searching for an age to find a good strength podcast I discovered the super strength show through Chris Duffins interview and have been hooked since. The format is excellent with some of the best voices in the world of strength and conditioning appearing. No nonsense straight talking, this really should be one of your first resources to go to if you are a coach or an average joe looking to improve in the weight room.

  • fantastic
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    i enjoyed your session.looking forward to more staff.Victor from the Youngpreneurs Podcast!

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    May 2, 2015 by TEEJ888888 from Canada

    I just listened to the first two episodes of the podcast. It's really good. The questions are solid, there is lots of good advice for lifting and for life, and Ray does a good job at interacting with the guest but keeping things on track and flowing. Ray is articulate and the guests seem professional and smart. Overall, I'm very impressed.

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    April 16, 2015 by mrcdmag from United States

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    February 24, 2015 by Tommy Eggleton from United Kingdom

    This show is phenomenal! The format and repeated questions for each episode keep the show driving forward, the guests have had ample time to prepare excellent and considered opinions and yet the show never feels like anything but no-BS conversations on building seuperhuman strength and mighty bodies. The host, Ray Toulany, consistently does a marvellous job of drawing out even more from his guests than the material they've prepared and some of the stories that are teased out are superb. I wholeheartedly recommend this to anybody that trains, thinks about training, or simply admires strength sports and bodybuilding in general.

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  • Paul McIlroy
    February 2, 2015 by Paul McIlroy from United Kingdom

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    January 26, 2015 by TaylorrrrNB from United States

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  • by Brandon Richey
    January 22, 2015 by Great Work SSS from United States

    The Super Strength Show is a fantastic resource for all things concerning strength, fitness, and life. The multitude of guests provides tons of information and perspectives that every listener will appreciate. If you’re serious about strength and the physical culture this is a resource that you just can’t pass up!

  • Very glad I stumbled across this podcast!
    January 22, 2015 by rk102 from United States

    Great info from big-time guests in the strength and conditioning world. Keep up the great work, Ray!

  • Awesome show
    January 13, 2015 by Bonjower from Canada

    The Podcast is the best I’ve encountered in the fitness/bodybuilding sector. The host has a great ability to pull the pertinent information out of his guests. The topics are great and you seem to be able to get useful information out of every interview! Awesome podcast!!

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  • Master SFG
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  • Well done Ray
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    Wow…Super Strenght Show Podcast is flat out awesome. Good production quality. Easy to listen. Very impressed Ray. Keep bringing it.

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184 Adam Feit: Fundamental Training Principles For Better Health & Performance

In this episode of the Super Strength Show, Adam Feit takes us on his journey to becoming a Level 2 Master Class Certification Coach and Assistant Director of Performance Nutrition for Precision Nutrition and the Director of Sports Performance for Reach Your Potential Training (RYPT). During this interview, Adam teaches you the fundamental training principles for better health and performance.  

Collapsable Transcript

Read Full Transcript

[INTRODUCTION]

 

[0:00:18.2] RT: What’s up Strength Maniacs? And thanks for tuning in. I’m pleased to welcome today’s guest, Adam Feit. Adam is a level two master class certification coach and assistant director of performance nutrition for Precision Nutrition, helping deliver life changing, research driven, nutrition coaching for everyone. He’s also the director of sports performance for Reach Your Potential Training, a private sports performance centre located in Central New Jersey.

 

Earlier in Adam’s career, he served as the head sports performance coach for Eastern Michigan university, as well as assistant strength and conditioning coach for the University of Louisville’s football team. He also served with the NFL’s Carolina Panthers where he assisted in program design and implemented the strength and conditioning programs including team’s performance nutrition program.

 

Adam’s passion for sports performance doesn’t end with coaching. He is an active competitive lifter in Olympic weightlifting, powerlifting and Strongman. Hell yeah. As I said earlier when I reviewed this, I’m loving this man. That type of a background is a beautiful thing. Actually, that’s a question I’m going to ask about how he manages to pull that off.

 

Adam is married to Marie Kate Feit. Also a sports performance coach and competitive lifter and has two beautiful children. Cody and Macy. You can connect with him by visiting AdamFeit.com and just so you know guys, it’s AdamFeit.com.

 

[INTERVIEW]

 

Adam, welcome to the show, I’m looking forward to getting into this.

 

[0:01:47.6] AF: Yeah it is, well Ray, that was quite the intro man, I appreciate you setting the tone right there.[0:01:52.1] RT: All right man, let’s just continue on with this and just keep knocking them out of the park, how does that sound?

 

[0:01:56.1] AF: Let’s do it.

 

[0:01:56.7] RT: All right. Okay, before we get into this, how about you share a little bit of info about yourself, we kind of had the 50,000 foot view of you and man training and nutrition, as it pertains to performance and training. Excuse the pun but you eat, sleep and breathe this stuff man. Tell us, how’d you get on this journey, how’d you get on this path, fill in some of the gaps for us.

 

[0:02:18.6] AF: Yeah, I think you did an awesome job kind of taking care of the big rocks and major life points along my journey thus far. I guess most a lot of us in this field of strength conditioning, sports performance, even with nutrition for instance. We had some mentors along the way very early on in our career and I think that’s been a commonality with a lot of people that you’ve had on the podcast. It’s no different really for me.

 

I became interested in weight lifting and training to become a better athlete, my high school years and right away with some of the guys I spent time with as coaches and as players, really set the tone for me to continue on and figure out there is a career in this. Kind of looking back, let’s say maybe almost 15 years now, finishing up high school, senior captain, senior season, it’s like everything to a 17, 18 year old young man and all of a sudden I had a season ending injury, I broke my arm on a pass play and tied in.

 

[0:03:14.9] RT: Yeah.

 

[0:03:15.4] AF: It was a pivotal point because that’s where I spent some time with the athletic trainer on the sidelines and trying to figure out exactly what the hell I was going to do with my life and he was the one, Kevin Afrael, never forget it and said, “Hey, you should be a strength coach man,” I had no idea what it was, turns out one of the best schools in the nation, Springfield college was right down the road in Western Massachusetts and I took it from there, I went on an interview, wanted an opportunity to play college football again to kind of get my redemption back.

 

I sat in my intro exercise science class when I was 18. Teacher was like, what do you guys want to do with your life? I knew it right then and there I wanted to be a division one health strength conditioning coach and I wanted to make athletes better because that’s what I wanted to do and I wanted to make sure I overtook that with my teammates and moving forward. I thought, “What better way to get paid, train athletes and just really watch your physical development from the get go?”

 

That’s how I started everything and my career at Springfield college was very fortunate to be around some great teammates and coaches, had a great season of development there and did a lot of internships to kind of pave the way, worked out a lot of different schools, started my field work at university of Connecticut, did my big internship at US Olympic Training Center out in San Diego working with USA’s finest and got down a little bit early, got done in three and a half years instead of four because I transferred in with some credits.

 

And kind of figured out, “Hey, if I want to keep going the way I’m going and get a job in this thing earlier than later, let’s do another one.” I got done and sitting around home and waiting for grad school applications to kind of fill the inbox. I went out to Arizona State and I was kind of the big tipping point in terms of who I would need, what I would learn and where I’d go from there. Went out there for a volunteer coaching position and that turned into a graduate assistant position at the citadel where I started my master’s degree.

 

That eventually led me back to Louisville where you kind of picked up the journey. Definitely very fortunate to where I am now in terms of coaching and living and just really crushing life was really early on and understand that. I had to do what it took right away and I kind of wait for things to happen on their own.

 

[0:05:18.6] RT: Okay, I got a question to ask you and this may seem almost silly ask this question. How much of a difference does proper program design and nutrition make in an athlete’s life or performance? What can you do with somebody? They show up, they’re raw recruit, they’re an athlete, they’ve been training for a while, they got the skill set down and all that stuff. What can training and proper nutrition potentially do for them?

 

[0:05:45.8] AF: Well I think it goes back into our company’s mission with Reach Your Potential Training is helping them maximize to performance both on and off the field. Really help them reach their potential because like a lot of us as we get started in kind of the iron game, we’re just kind of reading magazines or we’re scouring internet forums or what’s this guy doing or what’s this athlete doing? But in reality, if we’re just kind of jumping ship too often, we never really get to the point of destination right?

 

That was something I did as a high school athlete, I would train whatever I saw. I was really good at three sets of 10 because that’s kind of what I ran almost every bodybuilding book. All of a sudden I get to college and they’re testing me on 225 test or hang cleans and all this athletic based movements and I had no idea what I was doing. During those college years, it’s really eye opening to have coaches that understood the programming and the planning process and I so didn’t really dig into the nutrition and I kind of blew up.

 

I was an offensive lineman, I weighed in my [heddies] 280 pounds and I just wanted to get bigger and stronger, that’s all that matters. Kind of going back to the original question, planning and performance with the progressions of what you can do is pivotal because one, you don’t know where you’re going unless you know where you are right now. Then two, you can figure out along the journey and along the path exactly what you can do, what you can’t do and some of the setbacks that might come up.

 

And you got to be able to work around them because we often tell other coaches, the best program maybe written on that paper but you’re going to have to figure out how those athletes are feeling, you’re going to have to figure out how they’re adjusting. Because it may have seemed really great 12 weeks ago when you wrote it but things are going to have to change, curve balls are going to get thrown and as long as you have that general plan, you can work off something, that’s going to strive for kaizen, that continuous small improvement all the way through.

 

[0:07:28.1] RT: Yeah, definitely, awesome. Okay, let’s get into the first question of the interview that we normally ask and that is, how about you share with us one of your favorite success quotes or mottos that you use and how do you apply it in your training in your life?

 

[0:07:43.4] AF: Love this one man. This one came to me from a book that was recommended through a lot of coaches I had the privilege of working with and it comes from the book, Make the Big Time Where You Are by Frosty Westering who was one of the most successful division three football coaches out in the area but really, that west coast and the motto itself is “Make the big time where you are.”

 

Because I work with a lot of coaches, I work with a lot of athletes that they tend to find everything that’s wrong with the situation and they’re always looking for the next job, they’re always looking for the next opportunity and then they kind of fail to see exactly how awesome things are right now. If you’re a coach that you don’t have a big weight room or you don’t have a lot of help, you can make that big time where you are right now because it’s not going to be exactly what lies at the end of your journey, what’s at the end of the road, right?

 

You get on the high way, you’re passing some cars, you’re in the fast lane, you’re in the slow lane, you’re bumper to bumper traffic, all you care about is getting to the end. But my challenge to that is, what happens when you get to the end? Is it everything you thought it would be or did you actually enjoy the process as you went through? Making the big time where you are is kind of a philosophy that I’ve used in coaching and life because you may be in the position where it may not be the most optimal.

 

The grass may not be extremely green but you won’t know that until you get to another opportunity where you can compare that. So making the big time where you are is maximizing your development, it’s maximizing the time, it’s really for me as a coach is your impact with the resources that you do or do not have. So you do better and help other athletes and individuals on your tutelage to maximize their personal life.

 

[0:09:18.9] RT: Alright, awesome. It’s interesting to see how — to see what drives people, that’s one of the main reasons for this question and I’ve never heard of that book before actually, it sounds pretty interesting.

 

[0:09:29.5] AF: Yeah, one of my staples, one of the top three, four, five that I always recommend to coaches along the way because it really puts things into perspective in terms of we get so caught up in the outcome right? I know we’ve talked about this with some coaches of I want to lose weight or I want to squat 500 pounds and it’s like, you do everything you can, you’re pain yourself over to get to that result but what are you doing right now to enjoy this whole entire process? Are you taking in every opportunity around you to be mindful of it and have a good time with it?

 

[0:10:00.4] RT: All right, next question. That is, telling us a story of a time in your training when you encountered a major challenge. All right, so big obstacle you had to overcome, breaking your arms sounds like a bit of an obstacle but tell us what exactly occurred then and then paint for us the picture so we can kind of go back there with you and share the lessons that you learned from it.

 

[0:10:20.2] AF: Sure, yeah. Breaking my arm was definitely a game breaker, no pun intended because not only did it take me out of the gym but it also forced me to reflect exactly where I was in life, where I wanted to go. To build off that, I think there’s another big challenge as I got older and mature but breaking the arm itself was — it was a pivotal point in my life because I didn’t know what I wanted to do.

 

I didn’t take my SAT’s yet, I had no idea, I thought I was going to go to school and be a history teacher just because I had a pretty cool high school history teacher and I was like, “You know what? That looks like a good time. Maybe I can be someone like him.” So going through that time in my life, it was an opportunity for me to figure out exactly what was important to me, what did I value, what did I identify with and what were my priorities? And it turns out it was being fit, it was exercising, it was taking care of others.

 

So that definitely shaped the path in terms of where I would go to my coaching career but I’d say one of the biggest challenges as I got older and matured was, really as I got older, how my challenges started to escalate. My responsibilities started to really add up and as a college athlete, right? You have to do what you have to do to get by and show you’ll maximize your time you have there but it’s about playing ball, it’s about getting good grades and getting your foot in the door into coaching.

 

And then when I started coaching, I was football only with strength conditioning for the first three years of my career. When you’re a football only strength coach, you’re coaching football players and that’s it. As much time as you have with the day, you also got a lot of free time too because you’re only worrying about 105 guys at a time whereas. As I became a head coach, now I got 400 plus athletes, I’ve got 21 teams, I’ve got a staff to manage.

 

For the first time in my career and this was, I’d say about 24 years old. I was working out every day, I was training with former professional Strongman competitors, guys that are deadlifting in the 700’s, coaches that just, we trained our kids hard and we trained ourselves hard because that’s what I identified myself as, is I needed to be this super strong guy and this role model for these guys, whatever area the country they came from. So whether it was inner city, whether it was within the city, whether it was country boys like, we were the strength coaches and we had to be strong.

 

When I became kind of like the youngest head coach in the nation at 24, everything just kind of slapped me in the face. Training had to take a back seat and I had to figure out a way to maximize my gains and my development as a man, as a leader, as a manager and as a head coach but also to take care of myself. Going from football only and having a lot of time in the day to just kind of take care of me to shifting to an emphasis where I didn’t really have a lot of time but I knew I had to try and figure something out, so not everything was going to be lost, was kind of tough for me at the beginning.

 

[0:13:07.5] RT: Okay, it’s interesting you say that. I’ve touched on that topic a couple of times where my responsibilities and my schedule were a certain way, I had a certain set of responsibilities. My schedule, when it came to work, schooling, whatever it may be, was set a certain way. Then all of a sudden I had some change. Work changed, some things changes in life, nothing like bad, it’s just all of a sudden now I’m working a lot more than what I was before.

 

It was a pretty quick change and it was fairly dramatic change in the sense that I was putting in some serious hours and that may have had something to do with this but I didn’t clue in to the fact until later on after getting frustrated and disappointed and, “Why the heck ain’t I stick with my training?” All of a sudden I sat back and I said to myself, “Wait a minute. Well yeah, well I’m trying to apply the schedule I had prior to these commitments and responsibilities I now have, they’re incompatible, we got a problem here. So I need to make some changes so things work.

 

So I could get what I want and that may mean maybe training has to be reduced a little bit, maybe I have to shift it around somewhat so I could still get the type of results I want. Still manage to attend to the other responsibilities I have.”

 

Surprisingly, it took a bit man because I was running and it kind of caught me off guard and being somewhat hardheaded, you just kept thinking to yourself, “Oh, I’m gonna make this work. I’m gonna make this work. I’m going to make this work.” Really all you’re doing is you’re just trying to keep, it’s the definition of insanity, you’re just trying to keep doing the same thing over and over again, expecting a different result. It’s like, “Hello? How many times do you need to do this before you realize?”

 

[0:14:46.4] AF: Yeah, 100% and that carries over into everything too right? I’ve got a bad habit of saying yes a lot because I want to leave this awesome impact with the people and people. I identify myself with always being there and I’ll do anything I can and then all of a sudden you can only fit so many plates on your table, right? When you get, go ahead and you start getting rid of this plates, you’re like, “Okay, maybe I’ll free up some time, I could really be essential at the things that need to be taking care off.”

 

But then you’re just, I’ll still grab a plate but maybe it will be smaller. You finally get this routine down, “I’m going to do things like this now and now I’ve got the time and I’ll just kind of — I’ll ramp down a little bit but you kind of have this urge to be like well, why do two sets when I can do four? Why do six sets when I can do eight.” I think on the other side of the coin when this time and scheduling, all this issues kind of came up, it forced me to be a better coach.

 

Because now I realize, hey sure, if I had 90 minutes to train every day, yeah, I’m going to want to crank out a lot of volume. I’m going to train at a high level but hey, if I can get the same results in three sets instead of eight sets, now I’m thinking, I’m taking this long game approach right? I’m not so much worried about what’s it going to do for me now but can I keep this going for longer period of time?

 

[0:15:57.3] RT: Okay, so what were some of the shifts that you had to make to maintain your training and a few other things? Can you just kind of share some of that with us, what are some of the realizations that you had?

 

[0:16:08.1] AF: Yeah. Looking back on how it’s been and how it’s progressing, even now as a father and as a husband and everything that’s going on with my crazy life is I kind of took like the Pareto Principle where if I focus really on the 20%, like these big — we call them like big rocks. But the big multi-joints, three dimensional ground based movements, it’s what’s going to take care of let’s say the 80% of my results because when you’re kind of a young trainer and a young coach and you got some time , you’re going to try and do everything on to your son.

 

You’re going to try this out, you’re going to try that out. You can watch something online, you’re like, “Oh let’s throw that in,” right? It’s a good outcome based decision making that we talk about because how am I going to know how my athletes are going to respond to it for me as a coach unless I try it? You kind of find this way, you’re building the exercise poles. You’re just trying things just to figure out how it’s working for you and then you have this time that’s not there anymore. So it realigns with hey, what works, what do I know that works for me and how can I go ahead and reframe that?

 

So for me, a big shift for me was when I started to train for Strongman was there were a lot of filler type exercises that I really didn’t have to worry about. Let’s say one of them is a bench press, right? I’m here to say like it was going to do nothing for my Strongman training. So I had to analyze the sport and figure out okay, well, a lot of the stuff happens with putting weight over my head or putting away on my back or picking up a weight off a ground or moving with weight in my hands.

 

So how can I go ahead and shift my training to maximize that so I can not only bring my whole self as a strength athlete but also to be a better coach in program because there is so much time in the day and we have to figure out exactly what’s going to carry over and have that transfer to sport. At this time it really said hey, let’s cut through the unessential, let’s get rid of it and then let’s really, let’s put my money on what’s really going to work right  now because that’s what’s going to give us the results and that’s what’s going to keep us in the game for the long run.

 

[0:18:01.9] RT: Okay, very quickly before we move on to the next question. You said the Pareto’s law, what is that? You kind of explained it but if you could just specifically speak to that if you don’t’ mind.

 

[0:18:12.2] AF: It’s a principle, based off economics but essentially 80% of the results are going to come from 20% of the causes. When I look at it in terms of exercise programming, let’s say there’s a hundred exercises that you could do to be a better athlete. It could be everything from squatting, it could be bench, it could be overhead pressing, it could be hamstring curls, it could be calf raises, it could be elbow extensions, whatever you want to call it.

 

Let’s say you have a giant pull of 100 things but if you focused on the 20 biggest ones, the 20 things, the most amount of muscle, the most amount of joints, the most amount of impact on your sport, it’s going to accommodate 80% of the results that you would get. So if I focus on 80% of all the little things, if I had 80 small exercises, it’s still what it gave me the results at this big — what we call these money maker bang for your buck exercises.

 

So in programming, that’s how I look at it. If I get to the gym or let’s say I’ve got my kids with me, we’re at the facility before the kids get going. I’ve got 20 minutes to train, I’m not going to focus on steady state cardio, I’m not going to focus on my single joint movements towards the end of the workout. I’m going to say, “Okay, what’s going to recruit the most amount of muscle, what’s going to get me moving some serious weight?”

 

If I can do that by decreasing the time, the density in between sessions like the rest periods, I can get a great metabolic effect and kind of hammer home all these muscle groups that I normally wouldn’t get to. So that’s where, when I talk about Pareto’s Principles, is really focusing on those big rocks to training because I think as coaches and as athletes and just advocates of the strength iron sports that we get caught up with all the things that we could do whereas we should be focused on what we should be doing.

 

[0:19:50.3] RT: Okay, yeah. So could you give us an example very quickly for maybe — wow, this is a bit of a Pandora’s Box of a question. For a powerlifter — that’s probably really easy to answer. For a powerlifter, for an Olympic weightlifter, for a strong man and for some type of a field athlete, maybe even like a basketball pair like a core athlete, what are some of the exercises that you could quickly fire off that would represent the 20% that lead to the 80% result?

 

[0:20:20.4] AF: Sure, actually I’ll throw them all in because I think when you’re training athletes, you need to borrow from all strength disciplines right? You get your strength and explosion from Olympic lifting and powerlifting with your field sports, you know, as your movement. Let’s just start. If I get to the gym for instance and I’ve got 20 minutes, I’m going to focus on my Olympic lifts.

 

Whether it’s working triple extension, it’s working rate of force development with that bar, let’s say on day one I’ll do some sort of snatch variation. So that could be a hang snatch, that could be a power snatch, that could be a block snatch or snatch from the floor. Then if I only had time to do one more movement, let’s say we add some sort of squat variation.

 

Right there it’s a front squat, it’s a back squat, it’s a box squat, we’re looking at how much muscle and how many joints am I using here? Let’s say if it was a field sport athlete or something, I need to work conditioning, farmers walk would be really good here because you’re getting a bigger metabolic effect from carrying farmers walks for let’s say 10 bouts of 50 to 60 yards, you’re just going to hop on the spin bike and crank out a couple of cycles.

 

That could be day one of a program, day two would be, maybe this is our clean variation day, I get in the weight room, I’m warmed up, I’m ready to go, I’m doing some sort of hang and clean, a block clean, a power clean, a deck clean, something like that and then maybe I can do some sort of big pressing movements? So this could be my overhead presses, it could be my bench press.

 

My third day, what I would just kind of look at where I was with my balance if I needed a little bit more lower body and total body work, maybe I’ll throw in some sort of a clean and jerk variation or split jerks. So again, some heavy weight overhead and then if I squat it on let’s say day one, maybe I do some sort of deadlift variation. Within that framework for that movement athlete, I want to make sure I add some straight ahead sprinting, I want to throw some medicine balls, I want to jump on some boxes or go ahead and add some different elements of athleticism without weight. And then I can go ahead and kind of bunch that into a package and realize, “Hey, where are my deficiencies? Do I need to get my hamstrings stronger? Okay, let’s throw in some glut hams.”

 

For every type of press I’m doing, am I doing some sort of pull? If I’m overhead pressing, make sure I’m cranking out my chin ups and pull ups. If I’m benching a ton, make sure I’m hitting this dumbbell rows and this TRX rows. For me it’s all about, how can I stay in balance with the least amount of time as possible at the same time maximizing the development that I can get from these big, multi-joint movements.

 

[0:22:38.5] RT: Yeah, the beautiful thing is, when you focus on these stuff, your workout time, it’s severely reduced. I don’t even think it’s possible. You just said this I believe earlier. I don’t think it’s possible to get the results that these core movements provide if you’re wasting time with this other smaller movements. I don’t’ want to call them inferior, they may be inferior in regards to comparison of the results you get from the main lifts compared to these, you could almost say, assisted type of movements, accessory work.

 

A lot of people, they fall in to that. Sometimes I notice this, it’s kind of like the light night infomercials, they have this gadgets, use this gadget to tighten the inner thigh or use this gadget to tighten the upper quadrant of your buttocks or whatever. You will even see it sometimes with trainers, they put their clients through a variety of movements as opposed to working on the core movements. Yeah, they have to learn to obviously do them with proper form and be able to do them.

 

Those who are unable to do them for some reason, it completely make sense to possibly choose an alternative. But you get people doing 10, 20 different exercises when if they just did a hard set of squats, they would arguably hit 80% plus or if not more than a 100% with the results of getting with all this other stuff.

 

[0:23:55.7] AF: Oh 100%, you’ll see that in the fitness media right now on the other side of the corner, there’s guys making eBooks and products on like the one exercise day program, right? The 10 minutes a day to the rest of your life, things like that and they’re not messing around with this little things that are just, they’re not going to help you break a sweat. Most importantly, they’re not going to make you uncomfortable.

 

And I think like anything in life, there’s no challenge without the change but to get results is there’s going to be a period of growth and within that growth it’s going to be uncomfortable. It’s our job as trainees and trainers to embrace that and be comfortable being uncomfortable because the pay offs, the results will speak for themselves.

 

[0:24:34.4] RT: Agreed 100%. It’s just interesting when you do the right thing how a lot of other things kind of take care of themselves. Again, results, you get performance increase, muscle mass, you reduce the amount of time you’re in the gym, potentially. I mean it’s just interesting how many times when you do the correct things, items like that kind of fall into place.

 

Okay, let’s jump in to the next question and that is simply sharing a story of a time in your training when you encountered — sorry, when you had a major breakthrough. Again, similar to this one here where you could jump back for us and kind of paint the picture for us, explain it so we’re there with you and then tell us what was that moment that you were able to flip the switch and kind of have that light bulb aha moment?

 

[0:25:14.8] AF: Well unfortunately, it did end up in an injury and I feel like that’s a common thread with a lot of coaches talking about this moment but within that being said, it was definitely a period of growth and learning because I learned that if you chase too many chickens like Rocky did in his movie, you’re not going to catch one of them, you’re just going to go hungry.

 

So I was trying some things out, a new system of training, had to come out, triphasic training through Cal Dietz which it does an excellent job about lining, how there’s different phases of muscular contraction and how we should be targeting all of those throughout various cycles of the year and I also thought it was a good idea to kind of challenge my mind and body to run a half marathon because I’ve always been a strength power athlete, I was an offensive lineman.

 

So I got good at lifting weights and being an offensive lineman, you only had to work hard for a couple of seconds at a time. As I got older and I lost weight, I kind of figured out, “Hey, this lifting weight thing is working but I want to go ahead and stretch my comfort zone out a little bit.” So ironically or coincidentally, however we want to look at this type of reference but I was training for this half marathon which is really just no goal of mine, just to say that I did it.

 

I didn’t want to stop running, I want to say that I accomplished something and I was training hard in the gym and I was really burning the candle from two ends and within the middle itself. I found out that my body couldn’t handle the three to four runs per week with the half marathon plan that somebody had written up for me. Actually I just kind of stuck to hey, I’m just going to run two days a week and then that kind of got into one day per week.

 

So I was doing my long runs on Sunday and I just go out there in week one and it would be five miles, week two would be six miles and I go all the way up to get ready for 13 miles. I’d be training hard on Monday, ‘cause Monday was squat day. In squat rep, I’m on a heavy cycle of some eccentric work and all of a sudden I’m coming out of the bottom of a front squat and I just feel my back just completely spider web into the most painful nerve pain I’ve ever experienced and I wrapped the bar and sure enough, I was like, “Ah, you know, I’m all right, I’ll just kind of suck it up,” and I tried to get under the bar for the next set and then it was over.

 

Fast forward a little bit I found out that I bulge one of my disk in my thoracic spine which if you talk to a lot of lifters, they get a lot of problems with their lower back, their lumbar and sacral regions. This was kind of a unique approach because I met with some physios and physical therapist and they’re just like, “I’ve never seen a case like this,” and right there, I was like, “Okay. I’m telling my kids and I’m telling the people I’m around with to know your priorities and here I was trying to chase too many things. I’m going to the all you can eat buffet with two plates instead of one and I learn from it.”

 

Unfortunately, I had some injuries prior to that and I’ve lifted some heavier weight as I was training for strong man and power lifting and this was the defining moment and ever since then, now I’ve really had to scale back and I’ve had to be very smart with what I do and how I apply that and specifically how frequent that is. So I don’t need surgery but a couple of weeks later I thought I was good and then I sneeze and then my back went out again and I said, “You got to be kidding me, I’m in my mid-20’s, I can’t believe this is happening.”

 

But that was a breakthrough moment for me because I realize, “Hey, let’s stick to what I’ve been telling people and be really good at one thing and if I’m going to try something else. Hey, you’ve got it, tone it down on one side,” right? I’ll give you the analogy to my athletes that we have this bucket and everything that we take away from it leaves the bucket and everything that we add to I, adds to it. There’s sleep, there’s great nutrition, that’s going to add to our bucket or gas tank.

 

And then if I’m training, if I’m practicing, if I have mental issues with my girlfriend in high school or class work issues or fights with my parents, that’s going to drain form it. I just simply, I wasn’t filling my bucket enough and as frequent as I should have. I had to change my training. I’ve had to switch out some deadlift variations. I’ve had to listen to my body a little bit more because it’s important for me as a coach to continue to walk the walk but now I have to be very smart.

 

I just can’t open the door and be like all right, sweet, I’m going to catch you later, I’m just going to go for a walk. Now, where am I walking, how far am I walking, where am I turning, am I in the right side of the road because I’ve got kids now and in my life has many more years left of it. I want to make sure that I can maximize that living and not just sitting around to my backs all jacked up.

 

[0:29:37.9] RT: I hear you guys talking about that, the risk and reward as you mature and get older and not simply because you get older but many times simply because you’ve taken on more responsibilities and you just got to ask yourself, “Is it worth doing certain things that have a high risk for injury or a higher risk for injury than something else? And really, at the end of the day, how much more benefit or gain am I getting out of this specific thing, this activity, this exercise?”

 

And I know some of us are hearing this and even I am as I’m saying it, it’s like, “Man, I don’t want to live life like that where I’m limited.” It’s like, well it’s not about being limited, it’s about being intelligent. I mean it’s like, “Are you walking a tight wire between buildings?” “No.” “Why?” “Because I don’t want to fall down and kill myself.” To a degree, that’s an extreme but it’s something along those lines right? You got to be intelligent with what you’re doing, that’s all.

 

[0:30:30.2] AF: Yeah, it’s funny how we go back to that and as we’re younger in this field is who are we validating this actions for right? It’s like, “Oh I need to deadlift 500 pounds.” Well why? Is that a qualifying mark for a contents or are you trying to set a record and if you don’t have this outcomes clearly listed, what’s the point? Just because I’m a strength conditioning coach doesn’t mean I have to bench 700 pounds.

 

I should be able to demonstrate and coach and instruct exactly what I want my athletes to do because I firmly believe that if I’m going to have my athletes do it, I need to know what it feels like but it doesn’t mean I need to squat a thousand pounds in deadlift 800. And I really realized that when I got married and had my kids that I didn’t have to just walk the walk and sprint the straight away so to say. It was, I had to make intelligent decisions, right?

 

Training with the guys or spending time with the kids. What was going to be the risk versus reward, clearly I was going to value something more than the other. I knew that as my life got older and more responsibilities got added to my plate, I was going to have a lack of sleep, I was going to have this busy work schedule but I realized I can occasionally ramp up when I was feeling good. But in coaching you’re always telling kids like, “Hey, if you’re not first, you’re last,” right?

 

If you don’t lift heavier, if you don’t’ run faster, you’re going to get blown by and in reality, there is a time to sprint, there’s a time to slow down and hell, there’s even a time to just put the freaking cruise control on and just coast. As you get older we learn that and we can go ahead and modify as needed and instil those lessons and to the people that we get to work around with whether that’s our training partners, whether that’s our life partners, is there’s going to be various degrees of training.

 

[0:32:06.4] RT: Agreed. You know what? It’s interesting, quite a few of the people that I’ve talked to from precision nutrition, we’ve had quite a few on just in the last few episodes here. They really seem to — you guys seem to bring a lot more to the table than simply, “Here’s a workout to follow.”

 

You guys seem to really integrate it with the rest of life, you take that into consideration and I think there’s been a bit of a kind of, I don’t know, maybe with the internet, who knows? There’s been this kind of push towards the extreme side of training to the point of basically missing out on all other areas of your life, excluding other areas of your life. I think ultimately when you do that, you really end up losing out, I don’t think you really get as much out of your training or life, which is sad.

 

Talking to you guys, I got to tell you, whether it was you, Kate, Krista, I mean there’s a bunch of you, I talked to JB, you guys all brought very interesting concepts and thoughts and it’s like, “Guys, we’re here to train and have a good time but this is like, here to support the rest of our life unless you are a competitive athlete that’s trying to be the best of the best which technically, that should be your goal if you’re a competitive athlete. Otherwise, kind of strange. Why are you there.?”

 

The best that you can be bare minimum in my opinion should kind of be your goal if you’re competing. Then do you really need to be training the way you’re training, you’re doing the things that you’re doing. You’re following a workout program that’s designed for somebody who eat, lives, sleeps, breathes, nothing but training because this is an Olympic athlete that’s state sponsored and that’s the program you’re following.

 

Meanwhile you’re going to school, you got a part time job, you got a girlfriend and maybe you’re married with a couple of kids, I mean who knows? Can you not see that there’s some incompatibilities here? That is maybe giving you an extra percent or two in results where it’s important at that elite level. Does that makes sense? It’s like, “No, it doesn’t actually when I look at it like that.”

 

[0:33:54.3] AF: Yeah, just kind of to piggy back off that. I think that’s where the main stream media should do a better job of highlighting this individuals that, “Hey, they are running corporations, they are a family man, they are getting stuff done.” It’s amazing, like you go to Barns and Noble, you go to these bookstores and you go to the self-help section or motivation and it’s like, “Do this in only five steps and make the life you want to live.”

 

And then you read these things or you listen to these podcast and they don’t’ have families right? They’re living in their mom’s basement and they don’t know any adverse situations and they’ll tell you, “Hey, if you want to be the 100% best version of yourself, don’t get tied down and don’t put yourself in a position where other people are going to count on you.” I’m like, “That’s what life is man.” I was reading a book and I was listening to those podcast and I said, “I can’t resonate with this guy because he doesn’t share the same experiences that I go through,” right?

 

You tell athletes or you tell your training partner to suck it up and he’s got to make the most of it. “Hey, you don’t know what it’s like to go ahead and have it home man,” that changes the game or you got a big project, do it work. My challenge is to media and you’re doing a fantastic job is, “Hey, let’s get some real people with real problems and issues and ask them how they adjust to it.” Because when that curve ball gets thrown, these guys ain’t striking out man, they’re not going to sow with the fence because they’re smart, they’re intelligent and they understand to take it from a different angle.

 

[0:35:18.1] RT: Yeah. You know it’s funny, there’s a book that had a big impact on me and I talk about it all the time. Dinosaur Training by Brooks Kubik and he actually came across the information that’s in that book and the history of physical training, physical culture. He was in a point of his career, I think it was in mid-30’s, in his 30’s, lawyer and he was just slammed with work and he just had not time for anything.

 

All of a sudden he somehow came across this concept of a abbreviated training and having to adjust his training and that just kind of took him down this glorious path where he discovered the heritage and the history of physical culture and how they train back in the day and this and that and the other thing but it came out of necessity. “Necessity is the mother of all inventions,” as they say. I just find it’s interesting how when you’re kind of put into a situation where you are kind of forced to adapt to evolve.

 

A lot of good things come out of that but it’s interesting how for the most part we try to avoid being put into those positions. There’s a lot of that that tends to go on. It’s just, I think out of nature it’s like, “Well I don’t want to have to take on too many spinning plates.” It’s like yeah, because taking on too many spinning plates with the way we’re currently doing things is probably not going to work, you’re going to have to go about doing things slightly different. Then you will be able to handle that stuff in all likelihood.

 

Or the question is, are those plates even worth being messed around with, maybe you need to be looking at something else to do. It’s just having a bit of like a critical mind when thinking of what it is that you want to do. I think that’s important and I think that will take you really far, it will definitely help you minimize screwing around and wasting time with stuff that’s not ultimately getting you where you want to go.

 

[0:36:57.6] AF: Oh yeah, 100% on that. That’s going to be the essential practice at its best is what is it going to do for me now, what is it going to do for me in the long run and the best way to do things, right? Water is going to climb a mountain on its own right? It’s going to find the least amount of work, it’s going to do to kind of trickle down that mountain side.

 

So if we can find a way within our programming and the way that we’re living life to get the maximum result with the least amount of discomfort and with proper programming and strategies, I mean look, that should be our goal I think.

 

[0:37:28.1] RT: Yeah, agreed. Okay, we’re going to go to a break Adam. Guys, you’re listening to the Super Strength Show, we got Adam Feit on, he’s the assistant director of performance nutrition for PrecisionNutrition.com. Make sure you guys check out that website, they got some amazing stuff going on there. You want to get a source of information that cuts through all of the BS when it comes to nutrition and let me tell you, arguably one of the biggest mounds of BS out there is probably that underneath the banner or the heading of nutrition.

 

These guys are the people to go to, they’ll tell you exactly what you need to do and it’s really quality information man, without all the hype and BS and all that other crap, it’s good stuff. Make sure you check him out and we’ll be right back, hold on to your barbell, your dumbbells, your barbell, damn, that didn’t sound right did it? I think I might have to put the explicit rating on this interview now.

 

All right, we’ll be right back guys, hold on.

 

[BREAK MESSAGE]

 

[0:38:17.0] RT: The world of working out is seriously confusing at first. It punishes uneducated lifters with years of poor gains and injures, and reward smart ones with slabs of lean muscle and superhuman strength. If you don’t know if you’re using the right form, have hit a plateau, or things just seem a whole lot more confusing than you thought they’d be, I want to help you out.

 

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Whether you’re a novice lifter or have years of experience in the Iron game, this is a very helpful resource that you can either apply to your own training or use as a helpful guide to teach others. Stop wasting time and effort in the gym and get the info you need to maximize your gains and minimize your risk for injury. Visit www.Instantstrength.com and get your free report today.

 

[INTERVIEW CONTINUED]

 

[0:39:21.8] RT: All right guys, it’s the Super Strength Show and we’re back with our guest, Adam Feit who is, in addition to being a part of PN or PrecisionNutrition.com, he’s also the director of sports performance for reach your potential training which is in Jersey. Tell us a little bit about that before we get in to the other questions.

 

[0:39:39.4] AF: Wow, we are the opportunity for a lot of today’s youth, especially in Monmouth County New Jersey to go ahead and maximize their full development. We pride ourselves on helping them improve their self-esteem, their mental strength and then their physical dominance and I think that’s what really separates us from a lot of places in the area and just even worldwide because I think getting kids bigger, faster, stronger and less likelihood to incur an injury, that’s the easiest part of our job.

 

So what are we doing to make them better teammates, what are we doing to them to make them better athletes? But more importantly, what are we doing to make them better people for life in society? Because come 20 years down the road, it’s not going to be about how many scholarships we help get, it’s about what type of people they turned in to. We take a very holistic approach to coaching them, and we want to make sure that when they leave us, way better than when they first got to us.

 

[0:40:32.1] RT: All right, sounds good. How do people find out more about that?

 

[0:40:35.2] AF: Our website is igotrypt.com.

 

[0:40:45.2] RT: Okay, all right, I was going to say, “I got ripped — wait a minute?” Cool, I like that, okay, I like that one. All right, let’s get into the next question which is, if you could recommend one Adam, one resource for our listeners when it came to their training, what would you recommend? Book, app?

 

[0:41:01.6] AF: Does it have to be one?

 

[0:41:03.3] RT: Okay, go for it, what do you got for us? I’m sure the listeners are going to appreciate this.

 

[0:41:06.0] AF: I just got…

 

[0:41:06.7] RT: I try to make it easy by saying one. But yeah, no if you got more for me…

 

[0:41:09.5] AF: I got three really good ones so. I have to give credit to Mike Boyle for his original functional training for sports, this came out I think maybe it was like 2004, right before I got finished with undergrad and Mike Boyle’s been world renowned, working with high level athletes and running centres and kind of being on the performance circuit of speaking.

 

What I really loved about coach Boyle’s original book was it provided a template where we could actually go ahead and program, right? We weren’t just programming exercises. Like, “Oh, I’m going to the gym, I’ve got chest today.” So it was an incline press, it was a flat press, it was a cable cross over.

 

When I was training to be an athlete and learning how to coach athletes, the book kind of put in context of hey, why don’t we look at movement patterns? Instead of saying it’s squats today, it’s lower body push and then it’s a horizontal push and it’s a vertical pull. That was really the framework on how I started actually to learn how to program for myself and the athletes that I was coaching.

 

So I want to give a lot of credit to his book there because that kind of set the tone and then upgrading a little bit is when I start working with Joe Can who is the head training coach for the Carolina panthers was his book The Tier System. Because that took the frame work of a program and took it to another level in terms of intensity cycles, in terms of full exercise, pull development classification and kind of coming up with an organized classified order of where movement should fall within the weekly plan.

 

So it wasn’t just kind of piece milling exercises together, it wasn’t about body part split typing, it wasn’t about doing this type of move or that, it was about how can I get a system within the fool athletic base training model. Lastly, I’m going to recommend, I brought it up earlier but try basic training. It was kind of a rebirth of tempo training but again to a whole another level in terms of athletic development by Cal Dietz because a lot of us kind of grew up on like the Charles Harlequin, do your heavy centrics and that’s the best way to get hypotrophy and whatnot.

 

And Cal is the strength coach in the University of Minnesota, really applied the different phases of muscular contraction, eccentric, isometric, con centric and reactive to make sure that you are developing the whole entire athlete to get them as strong but mostly as powerful as possible. So I’d have to go — those are my top three for training.

 

[0:43:26.2] RT: Okay man, I love it and you are obviously passionate about them. We’ll have links to all of those in the show notes page and I love it man when guests bring more than one. It’s good when people bring bits of advice, they bring pieces of training resources, they’ll recommend this that or the other thing but it’s really nice man when it’s something that pretty much anybody can get their hands on and afford.

 

So I really appreciate that.  It’s amazing with the Internet nowadays how much information is out there and that’s a good and bad thing. When you guys show up and you guys are able to kind of help us cut through all that BS by providing a good resource that people can go to that’s tried and tested. It means a lot so thanks again, I really appreciate that Adam.

 

[0:44:04.0] AF: Yeah, absolutely. For sure.

 

[0:44:06.1] RT: Okay, here we go, this next question is one we like to have some fun with and when you answer, if you wouldn’t mind being — you know, drilling down, giving us some specifics that we could take away and put to use and just so you know, I get a little — you’ve listened to this show before so you know I get a little goofy sometimes. Here we go.

 

You’re doing your thing, you’re doing your training, you’re working away in the gym and you catch a whiff of something man and all of a sudden you have a flashback to collegiate days. It’s like a mound of jock straps man and it’s like junk funk is not good funk all right? At least that’s what we’ve heard right? Wasn’t there always one guy or I don’t know, maybe this is just a rumor that didn’t wash his jockstrap ‘cause he thought it was like good luck or bad luck to wash it? I don’t know.

[0:44:51.0] AF: Maybe, I can’t testify that on personal experience.

 

[0:44:54.0] RT: I come around the corner man…

 

[0:44:56.2] AF: I don’t want to incriminate anybody.

 

[0:44:56.9] RT: Yeah, I come around the corner and you’re like , “I just found him, it’s right there.” I think he’s picked up everybody else’s, this is a really weird guy man, what’s going on here? I come around the corner man, I’m like dude, it’s not me man, it’s the car. I hand you the keys, you walk outside, the one and only DeLorean, parked outside, full tank of hot garbage, ready to rock and roll man, you just got to floor it, pedal to the metal, get it up to 88 and then boom, back to the future, knowing what you now know, how would you structure your training to get the best results in the shortest period of time and set you up for long term success?

 

[0:45:28.0] AF: Man, the biggest one that if I had the opportunity to kind of ride in that and hit up 88 and kind of chat with Doc Brown and I’m going to spin it a little bit in terms of relating it to coaching athletes is, don’t neglect the movement work, right? Everybody always worries about how much they can lift, they got to go ahead and, “I want to send a PR in the weight room,” and that’s all they identify themselves with is getting on to this record boards.

 

I learned it as an athlete in high school, in college and even early in my coaching career was, we were so worried on how strong our kids were getting and we were not taking care of mastering the number one thing that they’re going to have with them the entire time and that’s your body. Within the movement work, it comes down to mastering these general physical preparation qualities of their bodyweight, sprinting, changing direction, body weight strength and calisthenics and gymnastics movement.

 

Because I’ve seen it with a lot of the work we’ve done with our jump training and working with thousands of high school athletes is if everybody’s just worried about training their bench press. as my partner Bobby Smith says, if all they’re worried about is their bench, that’s what they’re going to be sitting on. Because there’s just so much, this athletic development process that a lot of coaches, I still see it man, I see the forms, I see it online, on Facebook, I’m talking with coaches on conferences.

 

They just keep bragging about how many guys can clean this and dead lift this and squat this but when they get to the field, they can’t move, they’re getting hurt and they can’t go a little bit longer and sustain that capacity that we’re just trying so hard to develop. This is a big one for me man because I take it real close because I made the mistake and I want to make sure other coaches take the time to warm up, take the time to warm up, take the time to master your bodyweight, understand it’s a slow cooking process and don’t rush to just go ahead and put weight on the bar because we’re setting ourselves up, and the kids that we train around with and coach, for failure in the long run.

 

[0:47:27.1] RT: I like that. Just very quickly you mentioned jump training, is that something that can be trained so you’re saying, is it increasing vertical?

 

[0:47:34.9] AF: Yeah, when I look at it and we actually just finish a project on it, the coaches got the jump training. It’s, when we look at jumping, if you’re looking at it from a coaches’ standpoint of view. It’s a twofold approach. One, I want to go ahead and try to improve power right? I want to apply as much strength as possible and I want to do it the quickest amount of time and if you’re not confident teaching the Olympic lifting.

 

If you don’t have room to do medicine balls, jumping serves as a great way to get that triple extension that coaches are looking for as well as enhancing that kind of speed strength continuum because that’s where support is going to occur, it’s not going to occur if you hook a Nintendo unit to a squat bar, it’s not going to occur at .15 meters per second, it’s going to happen a lot faster than that.

 

We want to improve performance by enhancing that speed of movement but the most important thing I look at is decreasing the risk of injury because I’ll ask you Ray, when, let’s say you’re watching a basketball game right? March madness is going on right now, our guys is going to be getting hurt and going up for the lay up or slam dunk or they’re going to get hurt coming on the way down.

 

[0:48:36.1] RT: Yeah, obviously the latter.

 

[0:48:37.7] AF: Right, so we’re focusing, I see it on YouTube where everybody’s putting his highlight videos up, guys are box jumping 61 inches, their long jumping 12 feet and then following, their knees are touching and it’s like, “Why aren’t we worrying about the aftermath right?” We’re so concerned about stretching the measuring tape out further and razing the box site that nobody’s looking at the mechanics, nobody’s making sure that hey, their landing position is the same as their starting position because they’re going to have to jump again.

 

They’re going to have to push, plant, pivot, cut, turn, rotate, flex, extend and they got to be able to absorb force before they could produce that. We look at jump training twofold is yeah, let’s improve their performance and maybe it’s higher verticals, maybe it’s longer long jumps, maybe it’s a better control of your body but really, the latter is, let’s reduce the risk of future injury by controlling the eccentric movement and making sure that they can control that body when it matters most.

 

[0:49:30.0] RT: Yeah, if anything, they’re looking for trouble because they’re increasing their vertical but they’re doing absolutely nothing for their landing position and that is ultimately probably a bad thing because as you are, for the average athlete, probably that deceleration in that landing is probably not really as well as it could be.

 

Just period and then you go out on top of it even in increased vertical. “Well man, what are you doing here? You’re just adding more potential for injury and it’s interesting how the deceleration, that tends to be where a lot of the injuries occur in general isn’t it?

 

[0:50:05.8] AF: 100%. When you look at any type of body position that goes out of out of placement, right? You pull a hamstring sprinting, you tear an ACL, planting or cutting, these mechanisms of injury, a lot of it is related to this lack of eccentric strength and control.

 

Even goes into let’s say weight room performance right? You see the guys at the gym, they’re bouncing the bar off their chest, they’re catapulting it off and they’re showing no control of the bar and really respective of their — yeah it’s just one thing, I’m just really passionate about it, we work with a lot of female athletes and we see kids tear ACL’s one because of lack of adequate strength but two just body control.

 

It’s kind of a mission of ours to make sure that we’re seeking out the research, we’re working with great coaches and therapist to make sure that our kids, when they get to college and sport is a little bit more reactive, it’s a little bit more chaotic and it’s Amen, it’s not a pillow fight like it was in high school. You’re working with the best of the best that they don’t lose that first year because of injury, they don’t lose out on this time. Let’s get a head start on that, let’s keep them healthy so they can produce results.

 

[0:51:12.7] RT: Interesting. Okay, I know how many times people just want to, you know, they want to go faster, they want to accelerate quicker. It’s like a martial arts class, more often than not of any responsible martial arts class, will work with you on form. And then on defence, before they start adding in speed and some of the more aggressive offensive type of maneuvers or techniques and many times it’s like, “Okay, kind of boring, want to get to the other stuff.” It’s like, “Well yeah, that’s just going to get you into trouble if we don’t take care of this stuff first.” Definitely something to put on people’s radars and interesting that you mentioned that today. I appreciate that, thanks.

 

Now, you were saying, when it came to going back and setting things up to get the best results in the shortest period of time. Okay, you shared a couple of points with us, do you have anything else in particular you could give us, any specifics that we could take away and use right now? Also, again, not just to give you fast results, short term, that’s not all I’m talking about. Remember, also set you up for long term success as well. Do you have any other take away you can give us?

 

[0:52:10.1] AF: I think one of the biggest things that we can learn from some of the points previously listed is really develop a plan and understand that it’s going to be fluid, right? It’s going to change, you’re going to have days where we got all the time like we go off the script right? It’s like, “Hey, I’m feeling it man, maybe it was the caffeine pill or maybe it was the pre workout. I had a great night of sleep and the bar, the bar feels like the whole thing is filled with helium, these plates are just going up fast.”

 

When we talk about going off the script, it’s important to remember that we had a script in the first place. Respecting the script, most of the time but also listening to your body because let’s say you have a 90% week and I program a lot with intensities and relative intensities and just figuring out exactly where we are in terms of we’re feeling and how fast the bar is moving. But we may put on a 90% load which is going to be a very difficult load anywhere between one and four reps.

 

And if it’s super heavy and it’s feeling like it’s 100%, we got to be able to take that, have that confidence to kind of ease back and say, “Hey, it’s all right, today’s not the day, let’s reevaluate, let’s use some outcome based decision making and let’s maybe revisit this next week.” But going back to having a plan, it’s understanding that find out your outcome. If it’s a meet, let’s say it’s a competition, understand where you want to go and kind of reverse engineer that is how do I do the thing before the thing? If your goal is to total 1,200 pounds in your first powerlifting meet, well what are you going to do to get there?

 

That kind of goes in to what I’ve learned with working at Precision Nutrition is developing the skills and practices day in and day out. To build these habits so that we can go ahead and take care of this outcome. I like looking at everything from like a macro picture if it’s a 12 week program, “Hey, this is what I’m thinking in this phases. These are the type of goals I’m looking to accomplish.” But again, if you want to bench press 400 pounds well can you bench press 365 and can you bench press 315?

 

Are you doing the little things like actually tricep work, actually recovery work? Building this data pool of all these little skills and practices to get you to that outcome of goals. Tying it all together is respect the script, take the time to do it instead of just kind of winging it because winging it will only get you so far as you develop yourself in this physical culture of getting better and producing results is, you’re going to have to be a little bit more detailed as you go on to be an intermediate and advanced training.

 

[0:54:32.3] RT: It’s interesting. The one thing that, in addition to a lot of other things you said here just now. One thing that stuck out to me is having the confidence to say, “Okay, today we’re going to have to pull back a little bit.” Why did you use the word confidence?

 

[0:54:46.7] AF: I think a lot of it comes down to is we don’t want to second guises yourself and I think throughout the years of being an athlete especially we’re often told to land, play like an athlete or gets through it, toughen up, rub some dirt on it and when you go through that for so long you just kind of tend to believe it, right?

 

You hear this self-doubt and you’re like, negative self-talk, you’re just like, “All right, yeah, whatever, I just got to get through this.” Then you get older and then you realize, “No, it’s really not a good decision right now.” Maybe that’s gut based coaching, maybe this is kind of that inner thing, you’re just like, “I just don’t feel great about this and maybe it’s an experience,” like you’re herniated or bulge a disk where you realize, “Hey I should have listened to myself.”

 

I think the confidence aspect is understand, “Hey, I’m going to make a decision, I think this is the best thing for me not only now but for the future of let’s say my lifting career but I know I’m going to have the resiliency and the tenaciousness to go ahead and attack it when the time is right.” It could be the next day, it could be next week. Understanding and respecting the process I think is a crucial aspect as you get better in this game.

 

[0:55:47.2] RT: Yeah, agreed, agree and it is a fine line. There is some people who are going to think that potentially that this is, you’re wussing out by saying that and there are other people who may look at this and go, “Okay, this is my excuse to just never really push that hard,” and that’s not what we’re saying here.

 

What we’re saying is, you need to understand where that line is between pushing yourself when you need to be pushed and kind of letting off on the gas when you realize, “You know what? This is probably not the day to be doing this for some reason I may not be” — something is off, who knows, whatever it may be, you didn’t sleep enough the day before, you trained really hard the day before you recovered. Whatever it is, it’s probably better off, I kind of ease up a little bit. The question I have for you is, how do you determine where that line is? How do you figure that out?

 

[0:56:30.5] AF: Well, if we took it to the whole elite level, right now we’re in the world of technology, there’s awesome things out there like velocity based tracking devices, there’s heart rate variability. The game of technology is kind of making itself into a consumer level where you don’t have to pay thousands of dollars to get these devices for a couple of hundred bucks you can track the speed of the bar which we’ve shown to show signs of overreaching or over training.

 

You can do these Google surveys, you can figure out all these little apps that are happening but it’s a matter of trial and error and kind of testing it as it goes, if we go back to the basic principle of the scientific method, it’s testing things, it’s have a hypothesis, it’s collecting data. You want to make it real simple, keep a training log. Instead of writing, “I did five sets of five,” like Bill Star program, right?

 

“225 and then next week I did five sets of five at 250,” and the same thing with diet, don’t write down exactly what you train and what you eat, write down how you feel. Write down how you felt before, write down how you felt right after. Write down what your recovery protocol was like. How you felt the next day and I think that’s — I see it in the gym now and I’m very fortunate I work in a great facility, it’s 16,000 square feet, it’s an athletic factory.

 

But when I travel for business and I’m going to present on behalf of Precision Nutrition or the gym, I pop my head into a corporate wellness center or Anytime Fitness, something like that and you’re not seeing training logs. You’re seeing fancy headphones on top and guys texting in between sets and you’re not seeing people write things down. wWe want to make it real simple? How about we track our training and how we’re feeling before and after?

 

[0:58:05.7] RT: That’s an interesting bit. I know with me I’ll normally put down how much effort perceived effort it was to do the set but to add a little bit more inform in terms of felt fast, felt slow, felt energetic. I will tend to put that at the end of the session just in general how I felt during that session. You’re saying maybe to be a little bit more specific with that, maybe per meal, per set even to write down the type of info.

 

[0:58:31.7] AF: Well I think RP is definitely a great tool because that kind of takes the consideration a little bit of everything but I would usually try and do it, let’s say I get done snatching, let’s say the bar weight was 60%, I know how fast it should be based off my experience and it didn’t feel that fast. Well make some notes. Was it my technique, did I find my coach queuing me more than usual? Well then maybe that’s a technical issue.

 

Let’s say I go and do back squats for instance and I’m doing five sets of five like I said earlier and by that fourth and fifth rep, it’s a grind. Five reps set, let’s say 80% should be very doable. But if it’s really struggling, maybe that day that 80% feels more like 90% or 87 and a half. It could be within an intercept protocol but definite right rafter that exercise is done.

 

Because we do the same thing with food log and if I just wait until the end of the day, “Oh yeah, I had this, it was a good amount of this, I kind of had a little bit of that.” You forget and you lose sight of exactly how hard it was or how easy it was. If you try and do it at the end where all you’re trying to do is get out of the gym or put your kids down to bed and like, let me review my training log today. It’s probably not going to be as accurate as it could have been.

 

[0:59:42.9] RT: Yeah, agree 100%, it’s got to be done as it’s happening. You eat that meal, you finish up, boom, write down whatever it is you’re going to write down. You’re doing that set, boom, write down, right then and there. Even by the end of the workout, if you try to go back and put in information, tends not to be the best, it’s just not the way to go about doing it.

 

So I agree with you, that is some good advice and I really do think a training log is arguably one of the most important pieces of equipment or data that you could have. Like you, I don’t really see too many people tracking that stuff man and that really surprises me. I mean I got training logs that go back forever and ever. I mean since day one more or less. It’s surprising to see that people don’t have them and don’t refer to them.

 

[1:00:26.5] AF: Yeah, that’s one of the biggest things in determining feedback and where to go next and I’ll write out a great plan, I’ll put it on Microsoft excel, I’ll bring it with me. But sometimes I’ll just say I’ll swap it, I’ll put it on a note card and I’ll bring it out with me then I’ll take the note card and transfer it into my file because tracking is a necessary part of the decision making and changing process because — I mean you look at diet, right?

 

You work with these physique coaches, you see these things going online, they’re going to ask you, “What were your macros or how did you feel here and this and that?” Because they’re going to have to make changes and if you don’t have the data to quantify how you’re feeling and what your pictures are showing then how can you expect to move forward to make progress?

 

[1:01:04.5] RT: Agreed. Now, quickly, how do you use that information? So you’re tracking down your notes, you’re writing all this information, you’re writing down your workouts, how do you go back and use that, historically? Like I remember there was a time when I was training and this is hilarious. I almost didn’t want to change exercises because it’s like okay, I got really good at whatever, stiff leg dead lifts. I got really strong at them. But if I change, I’m not going to stay as strong at them and not only that. I’m not going to remember how much weight I did in the past.

 

That is ridiculous that I thought that but I mean that’s a novice man, that doesn’t know any better. Then all of a sudden I realize, “Well wait a minute, I’m writing all this stuff down, I could just go back and take a look at the last time that I did this.” So the question for you is, how do you go about maximizing that information that you’re gathering or getting extracting value from it?

 

[1:01:51.6] AF: Well I think it’s like anything is, you have some sort of a performance, I call it performance cycle but at RGM we call them that, we call them open sets or money sets and tell the kids we want them to cash out like take out the withdrawal but you have to have an idea of where you’re leading off. So if you’re a novice trainer and you’re changing the exercise every two weeks and you’re not really accommodating to that threshold of how much better you could get or how much stronger, you’re right, you’re not going to have any ideas.

 

So what I’ve done as you experience yourself through the game is, hey, I may only stick to a primary exercise for maybe three to four weeks at a time. But I’ll use what’s called like variation within simplicity and say, “Okay, I’m going to do the same movement, I’m going to still clean or I’m going to still squat but maybe I just changed the bar, maybe I just changed the box site?” And a lot can be popularize going back to Louie Simmons, the godfather of powerlifting.

 

But as you get older and you accumulate these years and this reps and sets in the squat rack so to say, if you vary just a little bit, it’s enough stimulus to keep progress moving forward and then you’re able to address weak points, you’re able to address these different aspects of a certain bar that maybe did to address earlier. Then when you go back to that, now you have concrete data. Hey, let’s say week three I did a sick bar bench press and I did 275 for eight, great.

 

You may not come back to that for another eight weeks or so but you’ll do others have suppressing exercises. So maybe it’s a new chocolate bar to keep those elbows healthier. Maybe you’ll do some incline or maybe you’ll do a higher board press but as long as you track your best, your personal effort, your record that you got and took care off, you can go back to that.

 

It’s really just about, “Hey, what did I get? Let’s write it down, let’s funnel that in for later and then let’s regroup, what did I get that time?” Not steer and clear from it right? Don’t take six months off from squatting. Find a way to squat, it could be barbell squat, it could be goblet squat, it could be land mind squat, it could be bodyweight squat, whatever it is. Continue to groove those motor patterns so the body stays in tune with it and then when it’s time to load it, you go for it.

 

[1:03:51.9] RT: How do you go back, like when you switch from one exercise to another? Like you said, you have a variety of squatting or pressing or pulling, whatever motions, potentially a month, two months, whatever can pass before you come back to a certain exercise.

 

How do you make sure that you’re able to find that information and know, “Okay, where was I last time with my sets and reps. The weight that I was using and all this other information that you need to know to make sure that I’m not just simply starting back at a weight that’s way below where I was and I know what to aim for and what to try to surpass,” if that is your goal?

 

[1:04:24.7] AF: Yeah, for me, it’s just simple logging. If it’s a black notebook that I carry with me, I take my notes in there or I do a lot of work on the computer with Microsoft excel with the programming for my own athletes is, I just make my file and I just keep a master record and I’ve got a file that I’ve been keeping since I started training very hard.

 

When I started Strongman training back in 2008 and that’s got some things that I’ve kept track and I’ve got some personal records, I’ve got some numbers, I’ll probably never hit again because I just had a — I was kind of a novice back then, right? You make your biggest gains early on and it gets harder and harder but for me it’s literally that. It’s carrying a log, it’s checking back in and just keeping track.

 

I find the same thing as a parent. My kids are growing up right in front of my eyes and I’ve got a folder that as we take pictures on our phones, it’s not just leaving them on our phones or posting them on Facebook. It’s, “Hey let me batch upload it and let’s put it into this folder and let’s track this journey together,” because I want to go back in 10 years and be like yeah.

 

I remember my PR’s. I know my biggest numbers, I know exactly where I was, I know exactly what I did. I may not know to the T what I ate before or what I ate after, but I remember that day and I remember what it does. I use video too. I tell my kids all the time, “If you did it, great but if it’s not on video it really doesn’t exist.” I kind of use that for, “Hey, I’ve done it, here’s the proof I’ve done it and here’s the training log I use to get there.”

 

[1:05:43.0] RT: All right Adam. Man, this has been a good interview. Man, there’s a lot of good information here and boy can you ever hear the passion that you have for training. For nutrition as well, which we surprisingly didn’t even get into too much detail about. We’re going to have to get you to come back on man, to talk to us about that.

 

[1:05:55.6] AF: Yeah, that sounds good to me man, It’s been quite a dual role, I love both and I thank strength conditioning for giving me the platform to be in nutrition coach because you could say whatever cliché thing you want, it’s nutrition’s, abs are made in the kitchen or there’s a difference on the field. We know it’s a big deal to our performance as trainees and as athletes as well. You got to do both.

 

[1:06:20.4] RT: Oh yeah, agreed, 100%. You got to throw in the sleep as well, the recovery. I think one thing that became very clear after doing a few of these interviews is the guys and the gals who are really doing good and really making serious progress, performing at the top levels. They take their training seriously but they also take their sleep and nutrition just as serious as their training.

 

[1:06:41.1] AF: Oh yeah.

 

[1:06:41.9] RT: I think a lot of us, I don’t know but all of us but there’s some of us out there I know I was guilty of this, you go to train and it’s just like that’s the battle, that’s the war and it’s like this is awesome. You get all excited and pumped up for it, which I know to some people training is misery but to most of us listening, we love it. And then the nutrition and sleep was stuff you had to do as well but you just didn’t — it didn’t carry the same weight or same importance, excuse the pun by the way.

 

It didn’t carry the same importance as your training did and the reality is, anyone of those is off kilter, it doesn’t matter how hard you train. I mean A, you’re not going to be able to train this hard and B, you’re just not going to be able to extract as much from your training, you’re leaving so much on the table which is ridiculous.

 

[1:07:20.2] AF: Yeah, it’s not even — people want to say, “I’m over trained,” or it’s so incredibly hard to over train. It’s more that we’re under recovering and if athletes would stop taking time off in the gym and enhance their recovery mechanism so whether that’s coming up with sleep rituals, dialling in on their nutrition which I found working with the thousands of athletes I’ve worked with, it’s always those two things. It’s eat more and sleep more. That’s going to take care of the training so you should never feel like you’re over training, you’re probably just under recovering.

 

[1:07:20.2] RT: Yeah, I would agree with you. There was — who said this? I remember reading it in a Body Magazine years ago, it was like Kevin Labronie or maybe Shawn Michaels. Anyway, one of these guys, it’s something like there’s no such thing as over training. It’s just something like under eating I think. Yes, sure, you can get to the point that you’re over trained, we’re not saying it’s impossible but I think the point you’re making is the majority of people who probably feel like they’re over trained, really, they just don’t have the other things in check.

 

[1:08:20.0] AF: Yeah, its’ working with everybody that we’ve worked with, there’s a 168 hours in the week, you may only train three to five of those.

 

[1:08:26.5] RT: Exactly.

 

[1:08:27.8] AF: So you talk about behavior modification and change. It’s, what are we doing to enhance their sessions and not during their session but after that. And that’s, hey, you break it out, the session’s over. Fill up your water bottle, what’s the post workout routine? Is it nutrition, is it stretching, is it cold tub, is it meditation, is it ritual? Whatever it is, it’s a much more involved process than just showing up and doing work.

 

[1:08:51.1] RT: Okay, I got it. We’re going to have to bring you back and we need to talk about, arguably have you on for nutrition and either in the same episode or a different episode, have you come back on and talk about post workout recovery. Or just recovery period. Just recovery, just all together, not necessarily just immediately after the workout. I would absolutely love to hear what you have to say about that. I imagine there’s some variety of rituals and things that you can do that fit all personality types.

 

[1:09:16.7] AF: Absolutely and I think going along as the research continue to get better and look more long term is we’ve made it out to be a little bit more harder than it needs to be and we shouldn’t be worrying about what type of protein blend we get or what type of oligosaccharide or what type of chemical we want to buy from a general nutrition center. It’s about keeping things basic and applicable to life and that’s what’s going to give us the best results.

 

[1:09:42.5] RT: All right, so that means yeas, you’re coming back on?

 

[1:09:44.7] AF: You got it, Love to be back.

 

[1:09:46.9] RT: All right, awesome, I love it. Okay, Adam, this has been awesome, thank you in behalf of myself and the listeners. Where do we find out more about you?

 

[1:09:55.0] AF: Well, personally, I’ve got my own blog website that I’m trying to keep up to date with but as you’ve heard, if you still listen since this point, it’s a kind of a little tough but my personal website is AdamFeit.com and the gym I’m a partner with located in central New Jersey right in between Philly and New York is igotrypt.com. But yeah, you can find us and the amazing work that we’re doing with Precision Nutrition and you’ve mentioned that earlier before at PrecisionNutrition.com.

 

Any of those websites, I’m also on social media pretty heavily so you can check me out on Facebook, my twitter handle is @Adam_Feit and then yeah, would love to connect, I’d appreciate if anybody is still listening, you haven’t cut us out yet, for your time because this has been really awesome.

 

[1:10:39.1] RT: We got an audience that’s rabid when it comes to their training and their nutrition and all things that fall underneath the banner of or the heading of physical culture. You’ve been delivering some goods, the passion as I mentioned, man, it’s contagious, the enthusiasm that comes off of you. This has been a great interview, I really appreciate you coming in here and sharing all this with us.

 

Guys, superstrengthshow.com, AdamFeit.com is the website and if you put in his name into the search bar in superstrengthshow.com, you will get this interview. You can download it, listen to it there again, there’s social media buttons that you can share with others, we really appreciate it when you do that. There’s links to the various podcasting platforms we’re on where you could listen to it there. Recommend you sign up, that way the shows come directly to you on to your device.

 

There’s also an option to leave a review. iTunes, five star reviews if you think we deserve it, they go a long way in helping us, we love each and every one of you guys out there that has done that for us, we really appreciate it. It means a lot, not only does it allow the show to go up higher in the rankings, it exposes it to other people so they can get in on the goodness and benefit from all this amazing information that the guest share with us.

 

What it also does is, it allows guys like Adam, these experts that are busy man, you heard Adam already say it earlier, he’s got his work, he’s got his trading. Oh, by the way, training, that’s another thing I wanted to ask him about. How does he blend Olympic weight lifting, strong man, power lifting, Adam, we got to have you back on man like three times now okay?

 

I wanted to ask you how you blend all that stuff together but anyway. That will be for next time. It’s never enough time guys to get all the questions and it just never is. Anyway. What it does is it allows guys like Adam who are busy, they see this platform, they see there’s an engaged audience because of the reviews and go you know what? We’re going to check this out because this seems to be well worth our time.

 

That benefits all of us in the end. Adam comes on, years and years of training, he mentioned he’s been through a pretty serious injury by the sounds of it, he’s performed at the highest levels when it comes to his coaching and whatnot. Years of training as I mentioned and he’s coming on here and he’s just sharing that wisdom with us.

 

One little tip which could have took him years to figure out. Boom, just like that, within a short little interview here, maybe not exactly short, short but short compared to Rogan experience, the Joe Rogan experience. Just like that, you gain wisdom, so that’s the magic of having these great guest come on the show.

 

That’s why we really bring that up all the time, those five star reviews, it allows to get this amazing guest to come on. Other than that, feedback — good bad or fugly, let us know. At feedback@superstrengthshow.com, don’t hold anything back, send it all over, if you have any training photos, if you have links to videos, before and after photos, if you have shots of your home gym for example. Your home setup.

 

Whether inside, outside, garage gorilla, cellar dweller, you name it. Send them over to info@superstrengthshow.com we’ll share it with our audience on the various social media platforms as well as our email list, all that great stuff. We love doing that guys, we really appreciate it when you do that.

 

All the goodies that Adam mentioned, ways to get a hold of him, all that other stuff, lobby on the show notes page, bonus Q&A, some videos, we got a lot of goodies, highly recommend you go to the show notes page. All right, again, superstrengthshow.com put in Adam Feit.

 

All right, with that being said, boom, we’re out of here, Adam, thank you so much, I really appreciate it.

 

[1:13:47.5] AF: Ray, it’s been an honor man, thank you so much for putting this together and it’s just an honor to be a part of all the other speakers and awesome coaches you’ve had the opportunity to interview like really means a lot. Thank you.

 

[1:13:58.3] RT: Thank you, you’re welcome and thank you. Guys, Precision Nutrition, they got a lot of amazing stuff going on. We’ve had a whack at their guys on here just in the last little bit. Check them out, highly recommend you guys check them out and if what Adam is saying resonates with you as I always say, the only real shortcut is doing it right the first time and that requires you to find a mentor who has been there, done that, has done it, taken others like you to the Promise Land and has come back and is willing to take you there too. PN, PrecisionNutrition.com, Adam Feit, these people, these are the guys that can do that for you too okay?

 

As we always say, put this stuff to use and until next time, train smart, train hard and we’ll talk to you then.
[END]

 

More Specifically in this Episode You’ll Learn About

  • Adam explains his unconvential path to becoming a fitness coach
  • Learn what proper training and nutrition can do for you
  • Starting with a general plan and then continuously making small changes along the way
  • How to accomplish your goals and enjoy the process of getting there
  • The importance of being able to adapt to life circumstances
  • Using the Pareto Principle to get things done more efficiently
  • Focus on the big rocks of training
  • Learn to how to scale things back and avoid tackling too many things at once
  • Consider the risk and reward factor when it comes to your training
  • Find out how to get maximum results with the least amount of discomfort
  • Adam explains what Reach Your Potential Training (RYPT) is all about
  • Don’t neglect the movement work
  • Learn how to develop a solid plan
  • Understand and respect the process of achieving your goals
  • Start to write down what you feel in your training log
  • Over Training Vs. Under Recovering

About Adam Feit

Adam Feit is a Level 2 Master Class Certification Coach and Assistant Director of Performance Nutrition for Precision Nutrition, helping deliver life-changing, research-driven nutrition coaching for everyone. He is also the Director of Sports Performance for Reach Your Potential Training (RYPT), a private sports performance center located in central New Jersey.

Earlier in Adam’s career, he served as the Head Sports Performance Coach for Eastern Michigan University, as well as Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach for the University of Louisville’s Football Team. He also served with the NFL’s Carolina Panthers, where he designed and implemented the strength and conditioning programs including the team’s performance nutrition program.

Adam’s passion for sports performance doesn’t end with coaching. He is an active competitive lifter in Olympic weightlifting, powerlifting and strongman. Adam is married to Mary Kate Feit (Jones), also a sports performance coach and competitive lifter, and has two children Cody (3) and Macy (1).

You can connect with him by visiting AdamFeit.com

Sponsors

FREE Report – Instant Strength: The one little trick that will instantly boost your strength by 10 lbs or more in your main lifts.

Success Quote

Adam Feit - Olympic Powerlifter - Super Strength Show - Quote1

 

Training Resources Mentioned in this Episode

RYPT – Reach Your Potential Training

Make The Big Time Where You Are by Frosty Westering

Functional Training For Sports by Mike Boyle

Coach’s Strength Training Playbook by Joe Kenn

Triphasic Training by Cal Dietz

Guest Videos

Delaware’s Strongest Man 2013

Back Squat 405×11

UGSS July 19 2009 London Ohio Adam Feit 600 SG Deficit DL

Connect With Adam Feit

Website
Facebook
Twitter  – @Adam_Feit
Instagram – @aefeit
Google +
YouTube

Bonus Q&A

Every person that we interview on The Super Strength Show has an opportunity to answer some extra questions that aren’t asked in the podcast. It’s a chance for our listeners to learn a little bit more about our guests and to get even more value from our show. Check out the answers that  Adam Feit provided below!

Can you share one of your habits that contribute to your success in the gym?   Always something never all or nothing. HRV scores will be down, joints will ache and motivation won’t always be there. Instead of calling it a day, MAKE IT A DAY.

What are your favourite exercises?  Cleans–all heights, weights and speeds. I love cleans.

What are your favourite muscle groups to train?  Always use a total body approach. that’s how my athletes compete and that’s how we train. You can’t ever choose which muscles to use or areas to involve. Sport is ground based, multi-joint and 3-dimensional. Let’s train that way.

What are your favourite pieces of equipment?  Weightlifting platform, chin-up bar and a squat rack. Possibilities are endless.  From a home based gym standpoint, it’s nice having an Airdyne, Powerblock set and some TRX straps!

What is currently on your workout music playlist?
Rick Ross
Bush
Eminem
Rage Against the Machine
Adele
Boy Sets Fire
Rise Against
Beastie Boys
Run DMC
Trick Daddy
Follow our gym on spotify here:  https://play.spotify.com/user/igotrypt

How do you psych up for a workout or set?  I usually pace around a few seconds, gather my thoughts, get my HR up and set the tone to succeed.

What was one exercise or routine that gave you great gains in muscle mass and/or strength? Strongman training. Splitting up my training split over the course of two weeks rather than just one really opened my eyes up to longer programming and planning. That and the Tier System.

What’s your favourite way to speed up recovery between workouts?  Activity with my kids. Tag, playground, whatever. I spend as much time as I can with them running around when I can.

What’s your favourite meal?  
1 bag of Rainbow salad
2 chicken breasts
1 bag of steamable quinoa and brown rice
Couple tablespoons of Sweet Baby Ray Wing Sauce and Glaze.

What’s your favourite cheat meal and how often do you indulge?  I try not to categorize meals as “cheats”–any type of meal should be enjoyed appropriately and mindfully. But, for those times when I’m looking for something a little “uncommon” it’s usually a thin crust pizza or a Qdoba burrito.

What supplements do you feel work well for you?  None. I am the worst at taking pills, powders and prescriptions.

What do you do to relax?  Travel. Strangely enough, my positions with Precision Nutrition and RYPT allow me to travel and present often. While working, I find just the act of getting away from family, the office and  “normalcy” of life really rejuvenates me.

 

Check Out What Others Are Saying on iTunes! 

  • Awesome Podcast
    April 21, 2017 by Brooke Craven from United States

    Ray, host of Super Strength Show, highlights all aspects of fitness and nutrition in this can't miss podcast. Ray and his expert guests offer insightful and inspirational advice on how to live a healthy lifestyle!

  • Un canal de lo mejorcito en la materia
    July 17, 2016 by Pipiripiii from Spain

    Un canal con contenido muy completo e interesante. Gracias ppr toda la info!

  • Informative, deep and instructional
    July 9, 2016 by Charles M R from United States

    That Frank Zane interview!

  • awesome fitness podcast and great variety
    July 7, 2016 by jskoosh71 from United States

    Really glad I found this. Lots of care into each podcast, Ray walks the walk and really understands what is being discussed. I really just have one request- stop the Delorean story.

  • 51 and going strong
    June 22, 2016 by Canvas back from Canada

    I used to lift heavy in my late teens and into my 30s and then other thinks like kids,job, house etc took over and I lost motivation. I'm 52 now and starting to show the signs of aging so I thought I better get back at it. It was real tough. Slower gains, easy injuries, slower recovery. Tough to get back into the grove. While searching for some motivating pod casts I came across the SSS pod casts. I listen daily and I can honestly say that it has changed my life. It's more motivating that a gym full of people. I have learned more in 2 months than I learned in 20 years. The host is great to listen to, is very knowledgeable and keeps me wanting more. The guests are great. I look forward to listening. We have a wellness committee at my work and I think I have the entire group as fans of the SSS. Please don't ever stop!

  • Physical Autonomy = Personal Liberty
    June 18, 2016 by Mrsborch from United States

    Ryan inspires me to change my fitness mindset from just doing more reps to creating a body to live the life I want.

  • Lucky find
    May 16, 2016 by Keith3187 from United States

    Stumbled upon this podcast and very glad I did, fantastic guests with tons of evidence based information, highly recommended.

  • Tier 1
    May 14, 2016 by Dragon 1-5 from United States

    Truly a great pod cast very informative and 100% applicable.

  • Great interviews
    May 5, 2016 by Adamdv18 from United States

    Ray has some very interesting guests on here and does a good job of getting some useful information out of them.

  • Intelligent, interesting interviews
    March 25, 2016 by Clown puncher 5000 from United States

    Really. Smart guys.

  • Killer Podcast
    February 26, 2016 by RidgeWC from United States

    Ray puts out a really great show—every episode is top quality!

  • Great work!
    January 14, 2016 by NotMattDamon from Canada

    Impressed by the content and guest - keep up the great work!

  • THE Super Strength Show
    December 14, 2015 by Oastorga from United States

    I came across this podcast through another great podcast (the RDella Podcast) and I must say I'm hooked. I like the action items that are revealed for us to do rather than just taking in more info. I especially like that is simple but not simplistic. I'm 58 years young and shows like this reafirm that I'm doing the right thing. I use Kettlebells, Sandbags, Barbells, Indian Clubs and body weight in my training. I don't look like a fitness model but I feel pretty good. Knowing more and refining techinque has been very important for me. The idea is not to just listen but to do something with the information. The format allows that. Thanks for your hard work.

  • BOOM!
    December 1, 2015 by Getusomemore from United States

    I listened to the entire interview with Danny Kavadlo while I was cooking dinner. VERY good podcast! I give it a ?!!

  • Highly recommend this show
    November 30, 2015 by Altruistic? from United States

    I love this show. Thoughtful host. Interesting guests. Since listening it, I have been giving more consideration to the mental side of training. It's a very encouraging show.

  • Great show!
    November 14, 2015 by Rmolson from United States

    I started training at the age of 41 obese and intimidated. The guests are an inspiration and encouragement toto keep moving forward on this journey.

  • Amazing Content
    November 13, 2015 by MattTucker93 from Canada

    Love listening to this podcast. Amazing information and I always learn something from all the great guests. Thank you!

  • Great show
    September 15, 2015 by unadjective from United States

    Some really cool guests that I wouldn't otherwise come across and Ray does a great job getting into their expertise. Almost always wish the show was longer.

  • I love this
    September 12, 2015 by Mvecdi from Canada

    Please don’t ever stop,i really enjoy it. Wish i found it before. I listen to it while working out or driving etc. Just wanted to tell you to keep doing what you are doing. And would love to see more of people like Mike Israetel etc. Such as Brad Schoenfeld. Anyways love the show, thanks for making it.

  • Very professional
    September 7, 2015 by Ayrshire Lad from United Kingdom

    Always learning something new from Ray and his well selected line up of guests. Sometimes feels a little repetitive as Ray asks all the tried and tested questions to ensure the listener always has a takeaway..its laid back but focused and very professional !!

  • I love this
    September 3, 2015 by Mvecdi from Canada

    Please don’t ever stop,i really enjoy it. Wish i found it before

  • The best podcast in the strength/ fitness industry!
    August 28, 2015 by Powerlifting101 from Canada

    I recommend this podcast to anyone that trying to physically and mental better them self in every aspect.

  • Excellent Resource
    July 25, 2015 by J. Steinmann from United States

    Some great interviews with a wide variety of people. I've listened to a number of episodes, and there's always some great information in every interview. If you're serious about strength training, health and fitness, or just want some good life philosophy, this podcast is worth a listen.

  • Must subscribe!
    July 9, 2015 by Roddygo from United States

    This is one of the best fitness podcasts. A lot of big names from various backgrounds and Ray asks good questions. He also knows when to ask follow up questions without getting too out of subject and having the guests share some more secrets

  • Great Show!
    July 8, 2015 by Wes Kennedy from Canada

    Ray is a great host and has a wide range of quality and professional coaches that have a TON of experience to share with you. Check it out!

  • Excellent interviews!
    July 8, 2015 by another anatomy geek from United States

    Ray does a fantastic job of asking articulate and interesting questions. I always really enjoy his podcasts and learn useful info! Keep up the good work!

  • has become the best Strength podcast
    June 21, 2015 by SuperHuman YYZ from Canada

    I think its overtaken superhuman radio and motivation + muscle as the top podcast for those who love physical culture and the iron game. Ray does a great job interviewing, just the right amount of interjecting his ideas and opinions. The guest list is incredible, the who's who, past and present.

  • The fountain of youth.
    June 10, 2015 by rroxanne from Canada

    Very good . I love the article. I listened to it 3 times to write everything down. Lol. Bad memory. Oh and love Rays voice.

  • just pure MEGA, Pig Iron all the way
    May 25, 2015 by Strongman1981 from United Kingdom

    The Super Strength Show is an amazing and extremely informative resource for anyone involved in physical culture. With an enthusiastic and highly intelligent host and a who’s who’s line up of guests, a must for anyone to sit down, eat grapefruits and enjoy. great work chaps

  • On another level! Once you hear one episode you will have to hear them all!
    May 22, 2015 by Chuck Osswald from United States

    Super Strength Show starts with top performers/coaches/trainers from around the world and chunks down all the important pieces, directed towards any audience. Ray Toulany is unparalled in his ability to make information easy to understand as well as tease out the unspoken gems. You will be glued to your speakers for the entire episode and find yourself eagerly waiting for more. The care put into each episode is clear with a show notes page that helps the curious learn in any medium. Keep up the great work and thanks Ray!

  • A fountain of Strength and training knowledge
    May 14, 2015 by HCF82 from United Kingdom

    After searching for an age to find a good strength podcast I discovered the super strength show through Chris Duffins interview and have been hooked since. The format is excellent with some of the best voices in the world of strength and conditioning appearing. No nonsense straight talking, this really should be one of your first resources to go to if you are a coach or an average joe looking to improve in the weight room.

  • fantastic
    May 10, 2015 by gena_wallis from Australia

    i enjoyed your session.looking forward to more staff.Victor from the Youngpreneurs Podcast!

  • Well structured, interesting, and informative.
    May 2, 2015 by TEEJ888888 from Canada

    I just listened to the first two episodes of the podcast. It's really good. The questions are solid, there is lots of good advice for lifting and for life, and Ray does a good job at interacting with the guest but keeping things on track and flowing. Ray is articulate and the guests seem professional and smart. Overall, I'm very impressed.

  • My top 5 favorite show!
    April 16, 2015 by mrcdmag from United States

    Great show with lots of valuable information! I always have my notebook open and writing.

  • Top strength show
    April 16, 2015 by Alastair7890 from United Kingdom

    Very informative. Top guests

  • Great Show!
    April 10, 2015 by SloneStrength from United States

    Well prepared show. Amazing professionalism! Keep up the great work.

  • AWESOMENESS CONTAINTED
    March 4, 2015 by jamie729 from United Kingdom

    This is an awesome podcast the format, the guests & the topics disscussed are all truely infomative. No BS contained the show always opens up new schools of thoughts and ideas to the listeners. keep up the good work.

  • Subscribe, instantly addictive
    March 2, 2015 by thebroadkaz from Canada

    This show is amazing to listen to it motivates you not only for the gym but for setting and achieving goals in your every day life. Very motivating and positive. Truly helps to get you in the right frame of mind for life and for the gym.

  • An absolutely ace show everytime
    February 24, 2015 by Tommy Eggleton from United Kingdom

    This show is phenomenal! The format and repeated questions for each episode keep the show driving forward, the guests have had ample time to prepare excellent and considered opinions and yet the show never feels like anything but no-BS conversations on building seuperhuman strength and mighty bodies. The host, Ray Toulany, consistently does a marvellous job of drawing out even more from his guests than the material they've prepared and some of the stories that are teased out are superb. I wholeheartedly recommend this to anybody that trains, thinks about training, or simply admires strength sports and bodybuilding in general.

  • Great Resource
    February 4, 2015 by Velvet Jones81 from United States

    For someone new to the strength sports like myself this show has been a great resource. Thanks for doing this show. It has helped a lot.

  • Paul McIlroy
    February 2, 2015 by Paul McIlroy from United Kingdom

    I've been an avid aficionado of all things strength and physical culture related for the vast majority of my entire life. As a former world champion powerlifter and trainer of world champions in different strength sports I can honestly say that Ray Toulany's Super Strength Show is an absolutely INVALUABLE resource for those wishing/needing to maximise their holistic understanding of strength, what it is to be strong, why that is important and how to best achieve it! The list of guests reads like a star studded "who's who" of strength and conditioning ROYALTY! Plus, more than anything the interviews are a ton of fun and provide a fascinating insight into the very best in the business and what makes them tick. It was my complete pleasure and privilege to be a guest on this amazing show (episode 37). If YOU claim to be serious about strength training and are not currently subscribed to THIS show, my honest advice is do so immediately...if not sooner!

  • Super Strength Show
    January 26, 2015 by Joeino from United States

    I love this podcast as I seem to pick up valuable information from each guest. Listing to this is a fun and productive use of my time

  • Excellent Information
    January 26, 2015 by TaylorrrrNB from United States

    These guys obviously do their homework, work hard to create an excellent show and know who to interview in the world of strength and fitness! I’m very impressed by what they have created and the quality of what they do. You need to subscribe! TODAY!!

  • by Brandon Richey
    January 22, 2015 by Great Work SSS from United States

    The Super Strength Show is a fantastic resource for all things concerning strength, fitness, and life. The multitude of guests provides tons of information and perspectives that every listener will appreciate. If you’re serious about strength and the physical culture this is a resource that you just can’t pass up!

  • Very glad I stumbled across this podcast!
    January 22, 2015 by rk102 from United States

    Great info from big-time guests in the strength and conditioning world. Keep up the great work, Ray!

  • Awesome show
    January 13, 2015 by Bonjower from Canada

    The Podcast is the best I’ve encountered in the fitness/bodybuilding sector. The host has a great ability to pull the pertinent information out of his guests. The topics are great and you seem to be able to get useful information out of every interview! Awesome podcast!!

  • Do yourself a favour and subscribe
    January 1, 2015 by GameOverBoss from Canada

    The amount of info and resources in the SuperStrengthShow is just incredible. All of this coming from guests that are the best of the best in their fields. Great questions are asked to these guys and some really insightful answers given (along with a few laughs). I hate wasting time and i'm always looking to evolve and refine my training. This podcast has saved me hours of digging through the crazy crap on the internet to find valid info. It has also introduced me to things i would have never thought to look up. Really can’t recommend enough.

  • Master SFG
    December 24, 2014 by X-Fab69 from Italy

    Awesome Podcast! A whole lot of great and useful information provided by very accomplished athletes and coaches with an extended experience on the ground!

  • Charles C
    December 22, 2014 by CharlieConnely from Canada

    Very impressed with the quality guests that the Super Strength Show is interviewing. Loaded with with actionable and inspiring information. Great production quality and daily episodes!

  • Well done Ray
    December 19, 2014 by Matt McWilliams from United States

    Wow…Super Strenght Show Podcast is flat out awesome. Good production quality. Easy to listen. Very impressed Ray. Keep bringing it.

Click here for the full page of reviews!

Before You Go – Rate, Review, and Subscribe In iTunes

Reviews for the podcast on iTunes are greatly appreciated (especially 5 star reviews) and will allow us to get the word out about the show and grow as a community. We read every single review on iTunes and believe that each one goes a long way in helping us make the show even better! Good, bad, or ugly, we want to get your feedback. It would mean the world to us if you participated in rating/reviewing our show in iTunes. Here’s how you can participate….

Step 1: Follow this link: Rate/Review Super Strength Show in iTunes

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Step 3: From here, you can provide your honest rating and review of our show.

Step 4: Finally, if you would like each episode automatically downloaded to your iTunes, hit the subscribe button on the iTunes page.

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183 Dr. Mike Israetel: The Essential Guide To Better Nutrition and Health

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182 Craig Weller: Find Your Purpose & Master The Fundamentals of Strength

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181 Chris Schoeck: The Art of Oldtime Strongman Feats of Strength

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180: Kate Solovieva: The Pursuit of Strength and Living The Ultimate Life

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